11

I'm working on a model that has two classes, Product and Transaction.

public class Product
{
    [DataMember]
    public Guid ProductId {get; set;}

    [DataMember]
    public virtual ICollection<Transaction> Transactions { get; set; }
}

public class Transaction
{
    [DataMember]
    public Guid TransactionId {get; set;}

    [DataMember]
    public DateTimeOffset Date { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public String Customer { get; set; }
}

How do I do a query that will retrieve a product and the Date of its transactions? I tried something like

var product = db.Products.Include(p => p.Transactions.Select(t => new { t.Date })).Where(p => p.ProductId = productId);

But it throws an exception:

The Include path expression must refer to a navigation property defined on the type. Use dotted paths for reference navigation properties and the Select operator for collection navigation properties

Edit for clarification: What I want to achieve is actually not loading TransactionId and Customer when Transaction is loaded.

1
  • You can't "not load" TransactionId and Customer because they were already loaded as they're not a navigation-properties. And even you were able to that, you'd gain no benefit from it...
    – haim770
    Apr 21, 2016 at 10:37

4 Answers 4

11

To achieve what you need you don't have other choice than project your query to an anonymous type or a DTO. As you can see, in the Include extension method you can just specify the related entities you want to load which is translated in an inner join with a table (or several joins, see the Remarks section in the quoted link), but that doesn't mean you're going to load all the properties from the related entities. If you call the Select method you can choose which columns you want to project, but you can't project a Linq to Entities query using an entity type, you must use one of the two options that I commented above. So, my advice is create in your business logic layer a set of classes (DTOs) to project the result of your queries, eg:

 public class ProductDTO
 {
    [DataMember]
    public Guid ProductId {get; set;}
    [DataMember]
    public virtual IEnumerable<DateTime> TransactionDates { get; set; }
 }

Later you can do something like this:

var product = db.Products.Where(p => p.ProductId = productId)
                         .Select(pr=> new ProductDTO
                         {
                           ProductId = pr.ProductId,
                           TransactionDates = pr.Transactions.Select(tr=>tr.Date),
                         }.ToList();
 

See I don't need to call Include extension method in this case, because in the Select I'm projecting a column from Transactions table. In that point the data is not still loaded, you are just defining a linq query that later is translated to sql. When that take place?, when you call ToList extension method.

As a last recommendation, I suggest you to take a look to Automapper. Once you have mapped your entities with their respective DTOs, your queries could be this way:

var product = db.Products.Where(p => p.ProductId == productId)
                         .ProjectTo<ProductDTO>()    
                         .ToList();

More info about ProjectTo extension method in this link

9

you could also try Anonymous projection

var product = db.Products.Where(p => p.ProductId = productId)
                         .Select(pr=> new 
                         {
                           product = pr,
                           transactionDates = pr.Transactions.Select(tr=>tr.Date),
                         }.ToList();
1
  • Each select results in additional brackets (list), is there any way to handle this? In your code there will be [ [ [ .. 3 brackets because there are 2 selects and then there is 1 ToList. Can you advise me how to remove those extra brackets?
    – variable
    Jan 6 at 8:08
-1

I think using a DTO is the best pattern. Anonymous projection works well if you're not returning the value.

Another option is to map to an anonymous type and then create the entity

public MyEntity Products => db.Products.Where(p => p.ProductId = productId)
     .Select(pr=> new {
         product = pr,
         transactionDates = pr.Transactions.Select(tr=>tr.Date),
     }
     .AsEnumerable()
     .Select(e => new MyEntity { ... }); // Initialize a Linq entity here
4
  • What is "the entity"? Product already is an entity. Feb 3, 2021 at 20:07
  • @GertArnold whichever entity that fits the bill, which one is irrelevant to the example. The problem is that LinqToQuery will complain if you instantiate an Entity in the query phase as a safe guard
    – CervEd
    Feb 3, 2021 at 22:18
  • Quite a hypothetical case then. If I want Customers, I get them from the database, not by converting them from Products. I think the accepted answer already touches all relevant aspects. BTW, EF-core dropped the limitation you mention. Feb 3, 2021 at 22:24
  • @GertArnold I'm not sure I'd say it's hypothetical. If you want a method to query the context without loading all fields from the database without using DTOs, this is how you'd do it. Still, I would strongly advise on using DTOs because this method really foregoes a lot of typesafety
    – CervEd
    Feb 3, 2021 at 22:42
-2

In addition to other answers, if you don't want to Reimplement the DTO class, you can do this:

public class ProductDTO : Product
{
}

So the DTO class will have the required fields and EF will not throw any exception.

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