1

I am learning about concurrency and wrote some code to prove interleaving in Scala. However count remains at 0 even with the join statements. Can anyone tell me what i am missing here?

object Main extends App {
  new Worker().doWork()
}

class Worker {
  private var count = 0
  def doWork() = {
    val t1 = new Thread{new Runnable {
      override def run(): Unit = {
        (0 to 10000).foreach {_ => count = count + 1}
      }
    }}
    val t2 = new Thread{new Runnable {
      override def run(): Unit = {
        (0 to 10000).foreach {_ => count = count + 1}
      }
    }}
    t1.start()
    t2.start()

    t1.join()
    t2.join()
    println(s"Thread: ${Thread.currentThread()} - $count")
  }

}
5
  • You have two threads updating shared, mutable, non synchronized state in parallel. What do you expect? – Yuval Itzchakov Apr 21 '16 at 15:21
  • Yuval even i the worst case scenario without synchronization count should still be two. – Benjamin Kadish Apr 21 '16 at 15:23
  • I actually expect something more than 0 but may or may not be 20000 – laiboonh Apr 21 '16 at 15:28
  • 20,002 but point taken – Benjamin Kadish Apr 21 '16 at 15:53
  • Your threads aren't running at all. The problem is the Runnable, if you just override the Thread's runO method it works as expected: val t1 = new Thread{ override def run(): Unit = { (0 to 10000).foreach {_ => count = count + 1} } } – The Archetypal Paul Apr 21 '16 at 16:00
9

The main problem is you are creating an anonymous class in your definition of Threads by using {} (curly braces) instead of () (parenthesis). Basically you are just instantiating Runnable objects in the constructor of t1 and t2 threads. In other words you are using simple Thread() constructor instead of Thread(Runnable r) constructor.

val t1 = new Thread { // this is the issue
  //creating anonymous class extending Thread
}

You should have used:

   val t1 = new Thread( // opening parenthesis
      new Runnable {
        override def run(): Unit = {
          (0 to 10000).foreach {_ => count = count + 1}
        }
    })                  // closing parenthesis 
2
  • Incidentally, extending Thread is another way of doing it, so he could simply write new Thread { override def run(): Unit = ... – Luigi Plinge Apr 21 '16 at 16:13
  • @LuigiPlinge as I put in my comment to the question :-P – The Archetypal Paul Apr 21 '16 at 17:34
0

Once you fix the problem caused by using {} instead of () for the Thread constructor you will see apparently random values for the count.

The reason is that you start the two threads at the same time, and t2 will begin counting before the join call to t1 (and there's no guarantee it won't continue running, only the main thread will wait for t1).

If you were to change the flow to start thread 1, join it, start thread 2, join it, you will get the result 20002 guaranteed, but if you run the two threads concurrently the result is random.

6
  • Are you sure result will be consistent? – justAbit Apr 21 '16 at 18:49
  • It shouldn't be needed. "The synchronized and volatile constructs, as well as the Thread.start() and Thread.join() methods, can form happens-before relationships" docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… – justinhj Apr 21 '16 at 19:10
  • Agree, but my point is even if loop in both threads ran 100 times, it's not sure that value of count will be 200. Since increment is not an atomic operation, it can interleave with increment operation in another loop. – justAbit Apr 21 '16 at 19:20
  • Increment itself is not atomic, but in this case the two loops are guaranteed to not to be running concurrently because the join call creates the happens-before relationship and so the write in thread t1 is guaranteed to be seen in thread t2. – justinhj Apr 21 '16 at 19:39
  • 1
    "f you change the flow to start thread 1, join it, start thread 2," thereby removing any point in using threads! – The Archetypal Paul Apr 21 '16 at 20:16

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