18

All over Stack Overflow and the internet I see that it is a good design principle to keep structs immutable. Unfortunately, I never see any implementation that actually causes these structs to be truly immutable.

Assuming that a struct does not have any reference types inside it, how do I actually make a struct immutable? That is, how do I prevent the mutation of any of its primitive field (perhaps by a compile-time/runtime exception)?

I wrote a simple test attempting make a struct immutable, but not even using the System.ComponentModel.ImmutableObjectAttribute worked:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ImmutableStruct immStruct1 = new ImmutableStruct();
        Console.WriteLine(immStruct1); //Before mutation.

        immStruct1.field1 = 1;
        immStruct1.field2 = "Hello";
        immStruct1.field3 = new object();
        Console.WriteLine(immStruct1); //After 1st mutation.

        immStruct1.field1 = 2;
        immStruct1.field2 = "World";
        immStruct1.field3 = new object();
        Console.WriteLine(immStruct1); //After 2nd mutation.

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

[ImmutableObject(true)]
struct ImmutableStruct
{
    public int field1;
    public string field2;
    public object field3;

    public override string ToString()
    {
        string field3String = "null";
        if (field3 != null)
        {
            field3String = field3.GetHashCode().ToString();
        }
        return String.Format("Field1: {0}, Field2: {1}, Field3: {2}", field1, field2, field3String);
    }
}
  • A bit OT, but is there some specific reason you need a struct instead of just using a class? I haven't found a usage case where a struct is preferable over a class in many years of LOB programming. – StingyJack Apr 21 '16 at 20:54
  • Mark fields as readonly? Also, have you seen this: stackoverflow.com/questions/29974301/… – Pawel Apr 21 '16 at 20:54
  • The struct in mind is similar to C++'s bitfield structs. The struct is instantiated, and my desire is that the struct will never be changed -- there is a promise being made that I've not modified the data by accident. – Nicholas Miller Apr 21 '16 at 20:57
19

Make the fields private readonly and pass the initial values in the constructor

public struct ImmutableStruct
{
    private readonly int _field1;
    private readonly string _field2;
    private readonly object _field3;

    public ImmutableStruct(int f1, string f2, object f3)
    {
        _field1 = f1;
        _field2 = f2;
        _field3 = f3;
    }

    public int Field1 { get { return _field1; } }
    public string Field2 { get { return _field2; } }
    public object Field3 { get { return _field3; } }
}

Starting with C#6.0 (Visual Studio 2015) You can use getter only properties

public struct ImmutableStruct
{
    public ImmutableStruct(int f1, string f2, object f3)
    {
        Field1 = f1;
        Field2 = f2;
        Field3 = f3;
    }

    public int Field1 { get; }
    public string Field2 { get; }
    public object Field3 { get; }
}

Note that readonly fields and getter only properties can be initialized either in the constructor or, in classes, also with field or property initializers public int Field1 { get; } = 7;.

It is not guaranteed that the constructor is run on a struct. E.g. if you have an array of structs, you must then call the initializers explicitly for each array element. For arrays of reference types all the elements are first initialized to null, which makes it obvious that you have to call new on each element. But it is easy to forget it for value types like structs.

var immutables = new ImmutableStruct[10];
immutables[0] = new ImmutableStruct(5, "hello", new Person());

Starting with C# 7.2, you can use Read-only structs

  • 2
    Field3 is still considered mutable because it is a reference type. You must return a copy of the object in the getter to keep the instance immutable. – Crowcoder Apr 21 '16 at 21:12
  • 3
    Or make the referenced object itself immutable. String is a reference type but immutable. Since structs represent value types, having a reference to a mutable reference type is probably not a good idea either. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Apr 21 '16 at 21:15
  • Nice answer! It works and is up to date! By the way, if you have a property initializer, it can only occur in a class. Otherwise you receive the error: "cannot have instance property or field initializers in structs". – Nicholas Miller Apr 21 '16 at 21:24
  • Ok, makes sense, since initialization code is not guaranteed to run (e.g. in arrays). – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Apr 21 '16 at 21:41
  • 1
    I think whether you consider the struct to be immutable or not depends on whether you are only interested in the reference equality of the object or if you mind the object state as well. It might be enough for you to know that the struct always returns the same connection object. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Apr 21 '16 at 21:52
3

Keep your immutable data private:

struct ImmutableStruct
{
    private int field1;
    private string field2;
    private object field3;

    public ImmutableStruct(int f1, string f2, object f3)
    {
        field1 = f1;
        field2 = f2;
        field3 = f3;
    }

    public int Field1 => field1;
    public string Field2 => field2;
    public object Field3 => field3;
}

Or less cluttered:

struct ImmutableStruct
{
    public ImmutableStruct(int f1, string f2, object f3)
    {
        Field1 = f1;
        Field2 = f2;
        Field3 = f3;
    }

    public int Field1 { get; }
    public string Field2 { get; }
    public object Field3 { get; }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.