25

I want to set the time position of a video in HTML5. The time should be set like this:

function settime(){
    var video = document.getElementById("video1");
    console.log(video.currentTime); //----->output for example 15.3
    video.currentTime = 10.0;
    console.log(video.currentTime);//----->>output always 0
}

And the video is embedded like this:

<button onclick="settime();">Set Time</button>
<div class="container">
<video id="video1" class="video-js vjs-default-skin" muted>
     <source src="video.m4v" type="video/mp4" />
     HTML5 Video is required for this example.
</video>

But for some reason, this always just resets currentTime to 0 in Chrome.

Why gets the time reset when setting currentTime? And how can I set currentTime correctly?

  • 2
    Is the video itself, visually, also going back to start or is it just the console.log showing 0? – user1693593 Apr 22 '16 at 2:17
  • 1
    Yes, any ideas why and what I am doing wrong? – user2212461 Apr 22 '16 at 2:20
  • 1
    The snippet seem correct to me - setting currentTime is also async but shouldn't matter here (as the video resets visually). The problem could be related to other parts not shown here. Do you have the possibility to set up a fiddle/inline snippet that can reproduce the problem? – user1693593 Apr 22 '16 at 2:23
  • 1
    I found out the code above works in firefox. Is there anything in Chrome that I might have to do differently? – user2212461 Apr 22 '16 at 2:41
  • Can you reproduce this with an other file? – Kaiido Apr 22 '16 at 3:09
5

I finally figured out an answer! Chrome requires you to set the currentTime as a String, and not as a number.

function settime() {
    var video = document.getElementById("video1");
    console.log(video.currentTime); // output 0
    video.currentTime = 10.0;
    console.log(video.currentTime); // output 0 for some chrome users or 10 for firefox and others
    video.currentTime = "10.0";
    console.log(video.currentTime); // output 10
}

settime();
<audio id="video1" src="https://sample-videos.com/audio/mp3/crowd-cheering.mp3" controls></audio>
<div>Click play to start the audio at 10 s.</div>

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This is definitely not the case in my current version of Chrome (73.0.3683.75) – Tyguy7 Mar 28 '19 at 21:32
  • 1
    Maybe they've fixed it by now, but it certainly functioned like that in my old version of Chrome. I should've noted what version I was using then. – lucasvw Mar 28 '19 at 22:30
  • Unfortunately, this did not solve the issue for me under Chrome 80.0.3987.162 (64 bit under Mint). I would've gone down to the nearest Google office and blown raspberries at them if it did, though. – Michael Scheper Apr 3 at 22:09
1

Seems you're using video.js. If so, get and set currentTime via VideoJsPlayer.currentTime() method.

For example:

const player = videojs(document.getElementById("video1"));

// read currentTime
console.log(player.currentTime());

//set currentTime
player.currentTime(10.0);

// read currentTime
console.log(player.currentTime());
| improve this answer | |
1

This is a bug in Chrome, which apparently only happens with 'some' videos. Similar bug reports have been filed and closed numerous times in the past, so I suggest we keep a watch on it, so it doesn't get closed again until the issue is actually fixed.

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0

In my case I had to update video serving server to return response with Status Code 206 and Content-Range and Content-Length headers

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0

I came across the same problem. Here's what happened in the bottom line.

  1. If you are writing code in an integrated development environment, then open your HTML file directly from a hard disk besides the IDE server - This happened to me, the server did not let you set an arbitrary time during video playback.
  2. You can check if the browser can perform this operation alert ("Start:" + player.seekable.start (0) + "End:" + player.seekable.end (0)); player.seekable returns a TimeRanges object: Definition and Usage The seekable property returns a TimeRanges object. The TimeRanges object represents ranges of the audio / video that are available for seeking for user. A seekable range is a time-range of audio / video where the user can seek (move playback position) to. For non-streaming videos it is often possible to seek anywhere in the video even before it has been buffered. Note: This property is read-only. www.w3schools.com article
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-1

It should be

var video = document.getElementById("video1");

as you have

<video id="video1" class="video-js vjs-default-skin" muted>
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Although your answer does point out a problem in the code, it does not answer the main problem of the question. – Idris Dopico Peña Mar 4 '19 at 11:15
  • @IdrisDopicoPeña: It is a real bug, though, so I don't think it's fair to downvote this answer. It would be much more constructive to just edit the question. – Michael Scheper Apr 3 at 22:03
  • @MichaelScheper - I only gave my feedback, I did not downvote this answer :). Even so, he only mentioned the fix (read: just gave the answer), instead of giving the feedback that was needed. – Idris Dopico Peña Apr 10 at 13:51

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