1

I'm trying to write a simple script to check if a file has numbers in its name, and to delete them if it does. Here's my code:

import os

directory = raw_input("Enter a path string: ")
print "This will now delete all numbers from the files in %s." %directory

for filename in os.listdir(directory):
    print filename
    for s in filename:
        if s.isdigit():
            print filename
            path = os.path.join(directory, filename)
            print path
            target = os.path.join(directory, filename.replace(s, ""))
            print target
            os.rename(path, target)

print "Done."

When I run it I get the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "EditFilename.py", line 15, in <module>
os.rename(path, target)
NameError: name 'path' is not defined

Which is weird, since path is clearly defined. If I define path above the for loop as path = "Nothing" then I get this error:

File "EditFilename.py", line 16, in <module>
os.rename(path, target)
OSError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory

I'm following what apparently worked from this link, but I can't get my code to work. It seems like the line os.rename(path, target) is being executed before the line path = os.path.join(directory, filename)!

Thanks in advance for your help, after four hours of google I don't know what to do.

  • Are you 100% sure that your indentation is correct? Maybe the rename line is not inside the if block at all. – tobias_k Apr 22 '16 at 14:20
  • The NameError you are getting probably means you haven't properly restarted Python between runs of your script. The code you posted here won't throw a NameError, no. – Martijn Pieters Apr 22 '16 at 14:27
  • Looking at the source of the question, it seems like you are mixing tabs and spaces. Don't do that! – tobias_k Apr 22 '16 at 14:27
  • Not a direct answer but why don't you use regular expressions (re) for it? pastebin.com/c81WtXP0 – chill0r Apr 22 '16 at 14:28
  • I was not aware that a module like this existed. Thanks for bringing it to my attention, I'm still reading up on it, but it looks like it may simplify things further. – LWKatze Apr 22 '16 at 17:00
1

Looking at the markup source of your question, it seems like you are mixing tabs and spaces for your Python indentation. Don't do this! This can severely confuse your Python interpreter and cause individual lines to be associated with different blocks than they should be.

It's difficult to determine how exactly your indentation was, because of the extra-indentation for the code block in the question, however, the first three lines in your if block as indented with 3 tabs and 4 spaces, and the following three lines with 8 spaces, 1 tab, and 4 more spaces.

Thus, what your Python interpreter is seeing is probably more like this:

for s in filename:
    if s.isdigit():
        print filename
        path = os.path.join(directory, filename)
        print path
    target = os.path.join(directory, filename.replace(s, ""))
    print target
    os.rename(path, target)

That is, the os.rename line is always executed, even if path was not previously defined in the if block, and if you define path = "Nothing" at the start, it will still have that value when Python hits the first os.rename.

To fix this, simply convert all the indentation to either tabs or spaces (which to use is somewhat a question of taste). Most text editors will do this for you if just indent and then de-dent everything (i.e. press Ctrl-A, Tab, Shift-Tab).

  • This was it, thank you very much! I'm still getting used to the fact that indentation matters to the interpreter. – LWKatze Apr 22 '16 at 16:45
3

The code you posted won't throw a NameError; make sure you properly restarted Python before running code you edited.

However, you do have other problems that'll lead to an OSError. You never exit your for s in filename: loop. So if there is more than one digit in your filename, you try to rename it multiple times:

>>> filename = 'hunter42'
>>> for s in filename:
...     if s.isdigit():
...         print 'renaming {} to {}'.format(filename, filename.replace(s, ''))
...
renaming hunter42 to hunter2
renaming hunter42 to hunter4

Since hunter42 was already renamed to hunter2, you can't rename it again to another name.

Use the any() function instead, to test for digits just once, instead of in a for loop:

for filename in os.listdir(directory):
    if any(s.isdigit() for s in filename):
        path = os.path.join(directory, filename)
        target = os.path.join(directory, filename.translate(None, '0123456789'))
        os.rename(path, target)

I used str.translate() to remove digits from the filename here:

>>> filename.translate(None, '01234567890')
'hunter'

You could also first translate the name, and if it is different from the original, then rename:

for filename in os.listdir(directory):
    newname = filename.translate(None, '0123456789')
    if filename != newname:
        path = os.path.join(directory, filename)
        target = os.path.join(directory, newname)
        os.rename(path, target)
  • While this is certainly true, I don't see how renaming the file multiple times would cause either that name error OP is experiencing or the "no such file" error... – tobias_k Apr 22 '16 at 14:22
  • @tobias_k: because the old file has already been renamed, you can't rename it again. – Martijn Pieters Apr 22 '16 at 14:23
  • @tobias_k: after renaming hunter42 to hunter2, trying to rename hunter42 to hunter4 won't work.. Note that the filename reference is unchanged in the loop! – Martijn Pieters Apr 22 '16 at 14:23
  • Ah, right, filename is not updated, the new name is only stored in target... but still, the NameError has to have some other reason (see my comment on the question). – tobias_k Apr 22 '16 at 14:25
  • The NameError was being thrown due to the indentation issue, like tobias_k said. I was not aware the any() and filename.translate methods existed, and I have implemented them. Thank you both your help! – LWKatze Apr 22 '16 at 16:49

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.