3

I'm wondering if there is a way in C++11 to get the number of arguments of a function?

For example for the function foo I want argCount to be 3.

void foo(int a, int b, int c) {}

int main() {
  size_t argCount = MAGIC(foo);
}
4
  • For which purpose should that be good for? Apr 22 '16 at 15:27
  • 1
    @πάνταῥεῖ, I know at least one application of this, in heavy metaprogramming
    – SergeyA
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:27
  • 5
    What is MAGIC supposed to return if there are several overloads that differ in number of arguments?
    – Baum mit Augen
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:28
  • 2
    @BaummitAugen, supposed to return an error. The same way the error will be returned if you try to take an address of an overloaded function without context. Do not see this as a show stopper.
    – SergeyA
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:42
9

Yes, it can be easily done:

#include <cstddef>
#include <iostream>

template <class R, class... ARGS>
struct function_ripper {
    static constexpr size_t n_args = sizeof...(ARGS);
};


template <class R, class... ARGS>
auto constexpr make_ripper(R (ARGS...) ) {
  return function_ripper<R, ARGS...>();
}

void foo(int, double, const char*);

void check_args() {
  constexpr size_t foo_args = decltype(make_ripper(foo))::n_args;

  std::cout << "Foo has  " << foo_args << " arguments.\n";
}
1
8

You can get that information by using a variadic function template.

#include <iostream>

template <typename R, typename ... Types> constexpr size_t getArgumentCount( R(*f)(Types ...))
{
   return sizeof...(Types);
}

//----------------------------------    
// Test it out with a few functions.
//----------------------------------    

void foo(int a, int b, int c)
{
}

int bar()
{
   return 0;
}

int baz(double)
{
   return 0;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << getArgumentCount(foo) << std::endl;
    std::cout << getArgumentCount(bar) << std::endl;
    std::cout << getArgumentCount(baz) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Output:

3
0
1

See it working at http://ideone.com/oqF8E8.

Update

Barry suggested use of:

template <typename R, typename ... Types> 
constexpr std::integral_constant<unsigned, sizeof ...(Types)> getArgumentCount( R(*f)(Types ...))
{
   return std::integral_constant<unsigned, sizeof ...(Types)>{};
}

With this, you can get the number of argument by using:

// Guaranteed to be evaluated at compile time
size_t count = decltype(getArgumentCount(foo))::value;

or

// Most likely evaluated at compile time
size_t count = getArgumentCount(foo).value;
10
  • Too complicated :) see my answer for a shorted example.
    – SergeyA
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:41
  • @SergeyA, thanks for the prod. It's now more simplified than your answer :)
    – R Sahu
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:49
  • So very much true! :) The only thing is, mine doesn't call a function, while yours does. You need to make yours constexpr, but this would still be no guarantee of it never being called - this is why I prefer my version. However, yours have simpler code.
    – SergeyA
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:51
  • @RSahu Prefer to just return an integral_constant than size_t (see Columbo's answer on the dupe)
    – Barry
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:59
  • @Barry, my understanding of integral_constant being used in the dupe is to simplify the implementation of struct get_arity. For a free function, such as I presented here, that won't add any extra value. Please let me know if I am missing something subtle.
    – R Sahu
    Apr 22 '16 at 16:03
2

This doesn't really make sense for several reasons.

For starters, what would this really be good for? You might be looking for some sort of reflection, but that doesn't (yet) exist in C++.

The main reason this doesn't make sense, however, is overload sets:

void f(int);
void f(int, int);
std::cout << MAGIC(f); // what should this print??
4
  • There is a way to do this.
    – SergeyA
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:41
  • The fact you can do it doesn't mean it makes sense, however. But yes, you're correct.
    – Ven
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:42
  • 3
    It makes perfect sence in many applications of template metaprogramming.
    – SergeyA
    Apr 22 '16 at 15:43
  • 1
    Why say it makes no sense when you don't even know what the use case is? This is exactly what is required for binding stack based scripting language native calls, you need the argument count.
    – paulm
    Feb 26 '17 at 0:48

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