32

I have the following function and I am trying to figure out a better way to append multiple items using appendChild().

When the user clicks on Add, each item should look like this:

<li>
  <input type="checkbox">
  <label>Content typed by the user</label>
  <input type="text">
  <button class="edit">Edit</button>
  <button class="delete">Delete</button>
</li>

and I have this function to add these elements:

function addNewItem(listElement, itemInput) {
  var listItem = document.createElement("li");
  var listItemCheckbox = document.createElement("input");
  var listItemLabel = document.createElement("label");
  var editableInput = document.createElement("input");
  var editButton = document.createElement("button");
  var deleteButton = document.createElement("button");

  // define types
  listItemCheckbox.type = "checkbox";
  editableInput.type = "text";

  // define content and class for buttons
  editButton.innerText = "Edit";
  editButton.className = "edit";
  deleteButton.innerText = "Delete";
  deleteButton.className = "delete";

  listItemLabel.innerText = itemText.value;

  // appendChild() - append these items to the li
  listElement.appendChild(listItem);
  listItem.appendChild(listItemCheckbox);
  listItem.appendChild(listItemLabel);
  listItem.appendChild(editButton);
  listItem.appendChild(deleteButton);

  if (itemText.value.length > 0) {
    itemText.value = "";
    inputFocus(itemText);
  }
}

But you can notice that I am repeating three times the appendChild() for listItem. Is it possible to add multiple items to the appendChild() ?

1
12

Personally, I don't see why you would do this.

But if you really need to replace all the appendChild() with one statement, you can assign the outerHTML of the created elements to the innerHTML of the li element.

You just need to replace the following:

  listElement.appendChild(listItem);
  listItem.appendChild(listItemCheckbox);
  listItem.appendChild(listItemLabel);
  listItem.appendChild(editButton);
  listItem.appendChild(deleteButton);

With the following:

listItem.innerHTML+= listItemCheckbox.outerHTML + listItemLabel.outerHTML + editButton.outerHTML + deleteButton.outerHTML;
listElement.appendChild(listItem);

Explanation:

The outerHTML attribute of the element DOM interface gets the serialized HTML fragment describing the element including its descendants. So assigning the outerHTML of the created elements to the innerHTML of the li element is similar to appending them to it.

4
  • 1
    This does not actually append the children, but instead a copy of them, which loses properties. – Michael Scott Cuthbert Apr 2 at 0:38
  • @MichaelScottCuthbertwhat properties are lost? I don't get it. It does what should be done. – cнŝdk Apr 2 at 13:43
  • 1
    Set a property like listCheckbox.asdf = 5; listItem.innerHTML = listCheckbox.outerHTML; listItem.querySelector('input').asdf === 5 and it will be false because properties (unlike attributes) are not found in the outerHTML. For input items, the most important property lost is .value (different from attribute "value"). Also event listeners, etc. For many purposes (including here), your solution works, but it does lose properties and is much slower. – Michael Scott Cuthbert Apr 2 at 21:56
  • @MichaelScottCuthbert Yes I understand what you mean you are right, but I meant here it was only needed to handle the HTML objects tree. – cнŝdk Apr 8 at 13:46
81

You can do it with DocumentFragment.

var documentFragment = document.createDocumentFragment();
documentFragment.appendChild(listItem);
listItem.appendChild(listItemCheckbox);
listItem.appendChild(listItemLabel);
listItem.appendChild(editButton);
listItem.appendChild(deleteButton);
listElement.appendChild(documentFragment);

DocumentFragments allow developers to place child elements onto an arbitrary node-like parent, allowing for node-like interactions without a true root node. Doing so allows developers to produce structure without doing so within the visible DOM

5
  • 10
    But none of those appendChild calls take place in the live DOM, so the browser won't try to re-render the entire DOM after each child is appended. Instead, only a single re-render takes place after the entire fragment is appended. – rodrigo-silveira Apr 24 '17 at 20:44
  • 3
    Great answer - DocumentFragment is a very useful way of batching changes to the rendered DOM. – And Finally Aug 19 '17 at 8:26
  • 4
    This should be the accepted answer as it uses the DOM API instead of strings. Very cool answer. Thank you. – 3Dos Feb 15 '18 at 13:33
  • 2
    mozilla doc: Document.createDocumentFragment() – GuoJunjun May 2 '20 at 15:48
  • Wow thanks! This is exactly what I was looking for! – 010011100101 Jul 11 '20 at 18:13
37

You can use the append method in JavaScript.

This is similar to jQuery's append method but it doesnot support IE and Edge.

You can change this code

listElement.appendChild(listItem);
listItem.appendChild(listItemCheckbox);
listItem.appendChild(listItemLabel);
listItem.appendChild(editButton);
listItem.appendChild(deleteButton);

to

listElement.append(listItem,listItemCheckbox,listItemLabel,editButton,deleteButton);
3
  • 1
    this is just awesome but too bad IE still doesn't support it. – Crismogram Apr 25 '18 at 20:08
  • 1
    As of Jan 2019 append is broadly supported but it is not standardized and considered an experimental technology. it should be used carefully – skzryzg Jan 25 '19 at 6:14
  • @skzryzg I think it is not experimental any more what I see from mdn. – Timo Apr 5 at 10:50
3

You need to append several children ? Just make it plural with appendChildren !

First things first :

HTMLLIElement.prototype.appendChildren = function () {

  for ( var i = 0 ; i < arguments.length ; i++ )

    this.appendChild( arguments[ i ] );

};

Then for any list element :

listElement.appendChildren( a, b, c, ... );

//check :
listElement.childNodes;//a, b, c, ...

Works with every element that has the appendChild method of course ! Like HTMLDivElement.

4
  • It would be nice to combine this with the DocumentFragment in Slavik's answer to keep the multiple appendChild calls out of the main DOM. – And Finally Aug 19 '17 at 8:28
  • @AndFinally - Genuinely curious/not sure: why? Cheaper operationally to repetitively add to a fragment than the DOM? – Jailbot Dec 27 '17 at 4:25
  • 2
    @RockinSocks Appending a series of nodes to a fragment and only appending the fragment once everything's put together avoids the browser having to do several recalculations of the position and size of elements on the page, i.e. doing several reflows. This way, the reflow only happens once, when you append the fragment to the live DOM. So the change should render faster. See here for a quick explanation - sitepoint.com/10-ways-minimize-reflows-improve-performance. – And Finally Dec 28 '17 at 10:30
  • @AndFinally Is this actually true for modern browsers? I would imagine browser will be smart enough to hold updates if there's a sequence of DOM changes happening in the single execution. – Max Yari Mar 5 '18 at 18:47
3

Merging the answers by @Atrahasis and @Slavik:

if (Node.prototype.appendChildren === undefined) {
  Node.prototype.appendChildren = function() {
    let children = [...arguments];

    if (
      children.length == 1 &&
      Object.prototype.toString.call(children[0]) === "[object Array]"
    ) {
      children = children[0];
    }

    const documentFragment = document.createDocumentFragment();
    children.forEach(c => documentFragment.appendChild(c));
    this.appendChild(documentFragment);
  };
}

This accepts children as multiple arguments, or as a single array argument:

foo.appendChildren(bar1, bar2, bar3);
bar.appendChildren([bar1, bar2, bar3]);

Update – June 2020

Most all current browsers support append and the "spread operator" now.

The calls above can be re-written as:

foo.append(bar1, bar2, bar3);
bar.append(...[bar1, bar2, bar3]);
2
  • 1
    P.S. ES6+ only and I'm sure this could be written in a better way. Spreading the nodes into an array/only accepting an array for the singular argument code path (mostly in order to use forEach) is probably pretty bad. Also, adding a function to Node.prototype/similar is probably something you shouldn't do. – Pend Feb 7 '18 at 4:22
  • I wrapped the polyfill in an existence condition. I think it is fine to add it to Node because Node is the object that defines appendChild. Although Sagar V's response is the best way, especially with support from the spread operator. I added an updated version to the end of your answer. – Mr. Polywhirl Jun 3 '20 at 18:19
2

It's possible to write your own function if you use the built in arguments object

function appendMultipleNodes(){
  var args = [].slice.call(arguments);
  for (var x = 1; x < args.length; x++){
      args[0].appendChild(args[x])
  }
  return args[0]
}

Then you would call the function as such:

appendMultipleNodes(parent, nodeOne, nodeTwo, nodeThree)
2

You could just group the elements into a single innerHTML group like this:

  let node = document.createElement('li');
  node.innerHTML = '<input type="checkbox"><label>Content typed by the user</label>  <input type="text"><button class="edit">Edit</button><button class="delete">Delete</button>';
  document.getElementById('orderedList').appendChild(node);

then appendChild() is only used once.

3
  • Be aware that doing so will remove any event listener attached to the appended nodes, as innerHTML does not retain these, unlike appendChild. – ojathelonius Nov 20 '18 at 14:51
  • @ojathelonius, that is irrelevant: the node is created here, so it does not have any event listeners any way. – trincot Dec 12 '18 at 13:21
  • I'm not talking about the node that is created here, but about its content. innerHTML does not retain any attached event listener. – ojathelonius Dec 12 '18 at 13:33
2

You can use createContextualFragment, it return a documentFragment created from a string. It is perfect if you have to build and append more than one Nodes to an existing Element all together, because you can add it all without the cons of innerHTML

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Range/createContextualFragment

// ...
var listItem = document.createElement("li");
var documentFragment = document.createRange().createContextualFragment(`
    <input type="checkbox">
    <label>Content typed by the user</label>
    <input type="text">
    <button class="edit">Edit</button>
    <button class="delete">Delete</button>
`)
listItem.appendChild(documentFragment)
// ...
0

I would like to add that if you want to add some variability to your html, you can also add variables like this:

let node = document.createElement('div');
node.classList.add("some-class");
node.innerHTML = `<div class="list">
                  <div class="title">${myObject.title}</div>
                  <div class="subtitle">${myObject.subtitle}
                </div>`;

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