5

What am I doing wrong?

> crossprod(1:3,4:6)
     [,1]
[1,]   32

According to this website:http://onlinemschool.com/math/assistance/vector/multiply1/

It should give:

{-3; 6; -3}

See also What is R's crossproduct function?

5
  • 2
    that function is just 1:3 %*% 4:6, not crossproduct in the physics sense – Rorschach Apr 22 '16 at 15:56
  • 2
    I'm voting to reopen, since the question seems to be about on how to do cross product in R and not about what crossprod does. – nicola Apr 22 '16 at 16:10
  • @nicola Nonetheless, the answers there do explain how to do cross products... – Frank Apr 22 '16 at 16:12
  • @Frank Yes, I agree on "This question already has an answer here" but not on "an exact duplicate of an existing question". Questions are clearly different. Honestly not sure whether to close it or not... – nicola Apr 22 '16 at 16:15
  • Yeah, it's fine either way. At least they're linked now. – Frank Apr 22 '16 at 16:18
7

Here is a generalized cross product:

xprod <- function(...) {
  args <- list(...)

  # Check for valid arguments

  if (length(args) == 0) {
    stop("No data supplied")
  }
  len <- unique(sapply(args, FUN=length))
  if (length(len) > 1) {
    stop("All vectors must be the same length")
  }
  if (len != length(args) + 1) {
    stop("Must supply N-1 vectors of length N")
  }

  # Compute generalized cross product by taking the determinant of sub-matricies

  m <- do.call(rbind, args)
  sapply(seq(len),
         FUN=function(i) {
           det(m[,-i,drop=FALSE]) * (-1)^(i+1)
         })
}

For your example:

> xprod(1:3, 4:6)
[1] -3  6 -3

This works for any dimension:

> xprod(c(0,1)) # 2d
[1] 1 0
> xprod(c(1,0,0), c(0,1,0)) # 3d
[1] 0 0 1
> xprod(c(1,0,0,0), c(0,1,0,0), c(0,0,1,0)) # 4d
[1]  0  0  0 -1

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_product

1
  • Thanks to G. V. Welland for the idea behind this (many years ago). – Matthew Lundberg Apr 23 '16 at 4:58
5

crossprod computes a Matrix Product. To perform a Cross Product, either write your function, or:

> install.packages("pracma") 
> require("pracma")
> cross(v1,v2)

if the first line above does not work, try this:

> install.packages("pracma", repos="https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/pracma/index.html”)
3

crossprod does the following: t(1:3) %*% 4:6

Therefore it is a 1x3 vector times a 3x1 vector --> a scalar

3
  • so what is this doing? onlinemschool.com/math/assistance/vector/multiply1 – Kevin Apr 22 '16 at 15:59
  • what NBATrends is saying is that a vector of same dimensions produces a vector where if you cross product vectors of opposite dimensions you get a number. The link you provided cross products 2 vectors of similar dimensions to produce a vector result. – scrappedcola Apr 22 '16 at 16:02
  • 2
    @Kevin Your link is related to the concept of a cross product, yes. The writers of R's predecessor, S, chose to reuse that term a different way, possibly oblivious to physics terminology. – Frank Apr 22 '16 at 16:03
2
crossProduct <- function(ab,ac){
  abci = ab[2] * ac[3] - ac[2] * ab[3];
  abcj = ac[1] * ab[3] - ab[1] * ac[3];
  abck = ab[1] * ac[2] - ac[1] * ab[2];
  return (c(abci, abcj, abck))
}
0
0

You can try expand.grid

expand.grid(LETTERS[1:3],letters[1:3])

Output:

 Var1 Var2
1    A    a
2    B    a
3    C    a
4    A    b
5    B    b
6    C    b
7    A    c
8    B    c
9    C    c

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