2

If the last 4 elements stepping forward are equal to the last 4 elements stepping backwards, print the number. I have input a number where the last 4 elements are clearly palindromic. Why does this not print the number?

def checkNum(i):
    num = str(i)
    if num[len(num)-5:len(num)-1:1] == num[len(num)-5:len(num)-1:-1]:
        print(num)
checkNum(777777)
2
  • Have you tried printing your two values that you are comparing? Apr 23, 2016 at 16:08
  • Yes everything works except for the -1 step Apr 23, 2016 at 16:08

4 Answers 4

6

You got the slices wrong. The left part of the string should be sliced like that: num[:4] and the right part should be sliced like that: num[:-5:-1]
Edit for the comment:
You can always print the slices you're attempting to use in the function. To get the problem, use something more visualising than 777777. For example: 123456789. Then, if you print your slices in the function, you will see the strings that you are comparing:

def checkNum(i):
    num = str(i)
    print(num[-4:])
    print(num[-4::-1])
    print(num[-5:-1])
checkNum(123456789)

The output you'll get is:

6789
654321
9876

This shows the way slices work. When you're using negative indexes, you're starting from the end with a positive step, so num[-4:] returns the last 4 characters in the original order. The negative step returns the first characters reversed. Consider some manual testing, it really saves a lot of time.

6
  • Well I get what you mean, but this is actually wrong. Can you tell my why this doesn't work? num[-4:] == num[-4::-1]: Apr 23, 2016 at 16:17
  • 1
    Ok so for future readers, Leva7's function as edited returns the number that is wholly palindromic, from beginning to end. Apr 23, 2016 at 16:24
  • @PencilCrate check out what I've wrote
    – illright
    Apr 23, 2016 at 16:29
  • This is a great description of how negative indexes work. Great examples. Apr 23, 2016 at 16:39
  • How do you get the last 4 in reverse Apr 23, 2016 at 16:45
1

You are going backwards from len(num)-1 to len(num)-5 in the latter part of the equality!

Here's the correct version:

def checkNum(i):
num = str(i)
if num[len(num)-5:len(num)-1:1] == num[len(num)-1:len(num)-5:-1]:
    print(num)
checkNum(777777)
1
>>> num = str(777777)
>>> print num[len(num)-5:len(num)-1:1]
7777
>>> print num[len(num)-5:len(num)-1:-1]
***None***

To access the last four from the last position, you need

>>> print num[len(num)-1:len(num)-5:-1]
7777

def checkNum(i):
    num = str(i)
    if num[len(num)-5:len(num)-1:1] == num[len(num)-1:len(num)-5:-1]:
        print(num)

>>> checkNum(777777)
777777
1
  • 2
    While this does work, it is nowhere as efficient as it could be. Performance tests using the timeit module show that your way of slicing works twice as long because of accessing the string length
    – illright
    Apr 23, 2016 at 16:37
1

You could take the first 4 characters forward ([:4]), reverse the string ([::-1]) and take the first 4 characters again (which are now the last 4 characters reversed):

def checkNum(i):
    num = str(i)
    if num[:4] == num[::-1][:4]:
        print(num)

>>> checkNum("11118354367451111")
11118354367451111
>>> checkNum("1111835436745111")
>>> 
>>> checkNum("otto")
otto
>>> 

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