I create my own observable and subscribed two functions to it. I would expect to have both functions executed for each element in the sequence but only the last one is.

let observer = null
const notificationArrayStream = Rx.Observable.create(function (obs) {
  observer = obs;
  return () => {}
})

function trigger(something) {
  observer.next(something)
}

notificationArrayStream.subscribe((x) => console.log('a: ' + x))
notificationArrayStream.subscribe((x) => console.log('b: ' + x))

trigger('TEST')

Expected output

a: TEST
b: TEST

Actual output

b: TEST

Here's the JSBin: http://jsbin.com/cahoyey/edit?js,console

Why is that? How can I have multiple functions subscribe to a single Observable?

up vote 14 down vote accepted

To have multiple functions subscribe to a single Observable, just subscribe them to that observable, it is that simple. And actually that's what you did.

BUT your code does not work because after notificationArrayStream.subscribe((x) => console.log('b: ' + x)) is executed, observer is (x) => console.log('b: ' + x)), so observer.next will give you b: TEST.

So basically it is your observable creation which is wrong. In create you passed an observer as parameter so you can pass it values. Those values you need to generate somehow through your own logic, but as you can see your logic here is erroneous. I would recommend you use a subject if you want to push values to the observer.

Something like:

const notificationArrayStream = Rx.Observable.create(function (obs) {
  mySubject.subscribe(obs);
  return () => {}
})

function trigger(something) {
  mySubject.next(something)
}
  • 1
    Thanks, Subjects were the missing link. For future reference: jsbin.com/wifokoc/edit?js,console – cgross Apr 23 '16 at 21:05
  • 3
    "because after (...) is executed observer is (x) => console.log('b: ' + x))" why ? could you elaborate a bit more or show reference, please ? – n00dl3 Jun 21 '16 at 9:40
  • okay, found reference here – n00dl3 Jun 21 '16 at 9:48
  • 2
    You did not specify why your answer is correct or why his approach is wrong. – Stav Alfi Sep 24 '16 at 20:50

Subject

In your case, you could simply use a Subject. A subject allows you to share a single execution with multiple observers when using it as a proxy for a group of subscribers and a source.

In essence, here's your example using a subject:

const subject = new Subject();

function trigger(something) {
    subject.next(something);
}

subject.subscribe((x) => console.log('a: ' + x));
subject.subscribe((x) => console.log('b: ' + x));

trigger('TEST');

Result:

a: TEST
b: TEST

Pitfall: Observers arriving too late

Note that the timing of when you subscribe and when you broadcast the data is relevant. If you send a broadcast before subscribing, you're not getting notified by this broadcast:

function trigger(something) {
    subject.next(something);
}

trigger('TEST');

subject.subscribe((x) => console.log('a: ' + x));
subject.subscribe((x) => console.log('b: ' + x));

Result: (empty)


ReplaySubject & BehaviorSubject

If you want to ensure that even future subscribers get notified, you can use a ReplaySubject or a BehaviorSubject instead.

Here's an example using a ReplaySubject (with a cache-size of 5, meaning up to 5 values from the past will be remembered, as opposed to a BehaviorSubject which can remember only the last value):

const subject = new ReplaySubject(5); // buffer size is 5

function trigger(something) {
    subject.next(something);
}

trigger('TEST');

subject.subscribe((x) => console.log('a: ' + x));
subject.subscribe((x) => console.log('b: ' + x));

Result:

a: TEST
b: TEST
  • 1
    Thank you for these answers, they helped me! – Laiso Jan 2 at 11:53

Every time you subscribe, you are overriding the var observer.

The trigger function only reference this one var, hence no surprise there is only one log.

If we make the var an array it works as intended: JS Bin

let obs = [];

let foo = Rx.Observable.create(function (observer) {
  obs.push(observer);
});

function trigger(sth){
//   console.log('trigger fn');
  obs.forEach(ob => ob.next(sth));
}

foo.subscribe(function (x) {
  console.log(`a:${x}`);
});
foo.subscribe(function (y) {
  console.log(`b:${y}`);
});

trigger(1);
trigger(2);
trigger(3);
trigger(4);

A cleaner solution would be to use Subject, as suggested above.

You can build wrapper class Subscribable<> based on ReplaySubject. It would be cleaner than managing Subject and Observable:

export class Subscribable<T> {

    private valueSource: Subject = new ReplaySubject(1);
    public value: Observable;
    private _value: T;

    constructor() {
        this.value = this.valueSource.asObservable();
    }

    public set(val: T) {
        this.valueSource.next(val);
        this._value = val;
    }

    public get(): T {
        return this._value;
    }
}

Usage:

let arrayStream : Subscribable<TYPE> = new Subscribable<TYPE>();

…
public setArrayStream (value: TYPE) {
    this.set(value);
}

Handle value change:

arrayStream.value.subscribe(res => { /*handle it*/ });

Original article: http://devinstance.net/articles/20170921/rxjs-subscribable

Instead of using a Subject, it is also possible to use the publishReplay() + refCount() combo to allow an observable to multicast to multiple subscribers:

const notificationArrayStream = Rx.Observable.create(function (obs) {
  observer = obs;
  return () => {}
}).pipe(publishReplay(), refCount())

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