10

I have the following two classes.

class Settings
{
    function __CONSTRUCT()
    {
        echo "Settings Construct";
    }
}

class PageManager extends Settings
{
    function __CONSTRUCT()
    {
        echo "PageManager Construct";
    }
}

$page = new PageManager();

I thought that would work fine, but it only runs PageManager's constructor. I'm assuming it's because I override the Setting's constructor. Is there some way I can call the parent's constructor as well?

17

Just call it using parent::

    /* Settings */
class Settings{
 function __CONSTRUCT(){
  echo "Settings Construct";
 }
}

/* PageManager */
class PageManager extends Settings{
 function __CONSTRUCT(){
    parent::__CONSTRUCT();
    echo "PageManager Construct";
 }
}

Have a look at the manual(Constructors and Destructors)!

  • 7
    it's better to call parent constructor before all instructions in child constructor, therefore we are sure that parent object is ready to use. – Tomasz Kowalczyk Sep 10 '10 at 1:02
  • @Tomasz Kowalczyk Is it? Well I changed my answer to reflect this so thanks! :) – Iznogood Sep 10 '10 at 1:08
  • @Thomasz That entirely depends on what the parent and the child constructors are supposed to do. It's not always better. – deceze Sep 10 '10 at 1:11
  • @Iznogood: if it is good, please vote up ;] – Tomasz Kowalczyk Sep 10 '10 at 1:15
  • @deceze - yes, you are right, but in most cases calling it first is better option, especially if we cannot see the base class implementation. – Tomasz Kowalczyk Sep 10 '10 at 1:15
0

In addition: you should know that this behaviour of PHP is not unique to the __construct() function.

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