11

I found some code in a project which looks like that :

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  // some stuff

 try {
  theApp.Run();
 } catch (std::exception& exc) {
  cerr << exc.what() << std::endl;
  exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
 }
 return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

I don't understand why the exceptions are being catched. If they weren't, the application would simply exit and the exception would be printed.

Do you see any good reason to catch exceptions here ?


EDIT : I agree that it is good to print the exception error. However, wouldn't it be better to rethrow the exception ? I have the feeling that we are swallowing it here...

1
  • How can it be swallowed? The code prints the exception message, and then exits. What more can you do? If you rethrew the exception, who would see it? Where would it be caught? This is the program's entry point, after all.
    – jalf
    Dec 15, 2008 at 17:00

8 Answers 8

16

If an exception is uncaught, then the standard does not define whether the stack is unwound. So on some platforms destructors will be called, and on others the program will terminate immediately. Catching at the top level ensures that destructors are always called.

So, if you aren't running under the debugger, it's probably wise to catch everything: (...) as well as std::exception. Then your application code can clean up with RAII even on a fatal exception. In many such cases you don't actually need to clean up, since the OS will do it for you. But for instance you might prefer to disconnect cleanly from remote services where possible, and there might be resources external to the process, such as named pipes/mutexes, that you'd prefer to destroy rather than leaking.

Rethrowing the exception in main seems to me of limited use, since you've already lost the context in which it was originally thrown. I suppose that trapping an uncaught exception in the debugger is noisier than just logging the fault to std::cerr, so rethrowing would be the smart move if there's a chance of missing the logging.

If you want the debugger to trap unexpected conditions in debug mode, which in release mode throw an exception that eventually results in an exit, then there are other ways to do that than leaving the exception uncaught so that the debugger sees it. For example, you could use assert macros. Of course, that doesn't help with unexpected and unpredictable conditions, like hardware exceptions if you're using SEH on .NET.

7

Try-catch in the main function hides the exception from debugger. I would say, it isn't good.

On the other hand, customers are not expected to have debuggers, so catching exceptions is nice. So it is good.

Personally, I catch all exceptions in main function, when making a release build, and I don't do that, when building a debug configuration.

6

Why do you say that the exception would be printed? This is not the typical behavior of the C++ runtime. At best, you can expect that its type gets printed.

In addition, this program leaves a "failure" status, whereas an exception might cause a termination-through-abort status (i.e. with a signal indicated in the exit code).

1
  • You are right, I mistakenly thought that the exception would be printed. It is not the case.
    – Barth
    Dec 15, 2008 at 12:24
5

A simple example of a situation where the stack did not unwind:
Why destructor is not called on exception?

A list of situations where exceptions may cause the application to terminate rather than unwind the stack.
Why destructor is not called on exception?

If an exception is not caught at any level and would escape main() then the implementation is allowed to call terminate() rather that unwinding the stack (yes this caught me by surprise as well).

As a result I always catch all exceptions in main().

int main()
{
    try
    {
    }
    catch(std::exception const& e)
    {  /* LOG */
       // optimally rethrow
    }
    catch(...) // Catch anything else.
    {  /* LOG */
       // optimally rethrow
    }
}

To help with catching problems during debugging. Derive your exceptions from std::exception and then stick the break point in the constructor for std::exception.

3

This is a global catch block. It is common for displaying a nice and user understood message ('Internal error') instead of a cryptic exception print-out. This may be not evident from the specific code block, but it is in general a good idea.

3
  • It's only a good idea, until the first time you have to debug some mysterious exception, that is thrown from hell knows where... :)
    – Paulius
    Dec 15, 2008 at 12:34
  • 1
    then can't we print it AND rethrow it ?
    – Barth
    Dec 15, 2008 at 12:42
  • I guess we can, but when I'm debugging - I rarely look at what's printed - I usually look at the values in the watch window (if I need to).
    – Paulius
    Dec 15, 2008 at 13:14
0

Have a look at the C++ bible i.e. Stroustrup, he has an example which is also repeated in Applied C++ programming. The reasoning is:

int main(void)
{
     try
     {
          // your code 
     }
     catch ( /* YourPossibleExceptions i.e. barfs you expect may occur */ )
     {
     }
     catch ( ... ) // unexpected errors, so you can exit gracefully
     {
     }
}
1
  • Yes. But as I mentioned in my answer - it doesn't really help the debugger. If the exception is not caught - the debugger will show you the exact location in source, where the exception is thrown. So, this only makes sense in release builds.
    – Paulius
    Dec 15, 2008 at 12:33
0

According the the Windows spec, the main isn't allowed to throw. (practically it results into the message that asks if you want to send the bug-report to Microsoft)

1
  • 3
    Could you possibly link to the Windows spec where it says this? that would provide some additional context / authority to your answer. Aug 6, 2012 at 13:57
0

There are some scenarios where a catch-all clause in main is harmful:

Debugger: The execution under debugger was already mentioned by @Paulius and later by others.

Core dump: In case of uncaught exceptions you may need to get a core-dump with proper call stack information. A catch-all in main makes it impossible to get the call-stack from where the exception was thrown. This can be relevant for systems in the field for later analyses.

As it is implementation defined whether a compiler does stack unwinding or not in case of an uncaught exception, there may be implementations where nevertheless some stack information is lost. However, for gcc it is clearly stated that no stack unwinding takes place if an exception is not caught: https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Exception-handling.html

A catch-all clause does not guarantee that destructors are called:

It was mentioned rightly that if you don't have a catch-all clause in the production code, you have to live with the fact that in case of such scenarios you can not rely on destructors being called. But you need to be robust against that situation anyway: On UNIX systems, for instance, the process could be kill -9'ed, or some other signal like SIGSEGV could be raised. All systems could go through a power-outage. Thus, it is in general wise to design the software such that you don't rely on destructors having done all the cleanup. This can be done, for example, by taking care of leftover files and other resources during the next startup of the process.

If you design your software to be robust against such cases, then you are also robust against the program exiting with an uncaught exception.

Summarized: Depending on what you want to achieve there can be good reasons not to have a catch-all clause in main, even for production code. And, even with a catch-all clause you should not assume that stack-unwinding always takes place.

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