4

I need some help on simplifying my method

I have this method

public double ComputeBasicAmount(double basicLimit, double eligibleAmt)
{
  return basicLimit * eligibleAmt;
}

sample usage:

Foo foo = new Foo(100, 1000);
double basicAmt = ComputeBasicAmount(foo.BasicLimit, foo.EligibleAmt)

The problem here is I want the eligibleAmt to be dynamic because sometimes it's not really only the eligbleAmt what I'm passing to the method.. like this

Foo foo = new Foo(100, 1000);
double basicAmt = ComputeBasicAmount(foo.BasicLimit, foo.EligibleAmt/foo.RoomRate)

My solution is use the Func delegate as a parameter but i don't know how to use it properly

i want something functional like this

public double ComputeBasicAmount<T>(double basicLimit, Func<T, double> multiplier)
{

 return basicLimt * multiplier;
}

double basicAmt = ComputeBasicAmount<Foo>(foo.BasicLimit, x => x.EligibleAmt/x.RoomRate)

can someone help me. thanks in advance...

5 Answers 5

7

If the multiplier depends on the item then either you'll need to pass the item as well, or you'll need to return a Func<T, double>:

public double ComputeBasicAmount<T>(double basicLimit,
                                    Func<T, double> multiplier,
                                    T item)
{    
    return basicLimt * multiplier(item);
}
...

double basicAmt = ComputeBasicAmount<Foo>(
                        foo.BasicLimit,
                        x => x.EligibleAmt / x.RoomRate,
                        foo)

or

public Func<T, double> ComputeBasicAmount<T>(double basicLimit,
                                             Func<T, double> multiplier)
{    
    return item => basicLimt * multiplier(item);
}
...
var basicAmtFunc = ComputeBasicAmount<Foo>(
                        foo.BasicLimit,
                        x => x.EligibleAmt / x.RoomRate);

var basicAmt = basicAmntFunc(foo);

If neither of those is what you were looking for, please explain where you want the actual value of T to be provided so that you can work out the multiplier.

The first is very similar to just having a Func<double> to compute the multiplier, of course... which in turn is pretty much like calling that Func<double> when computing the arguments, to get back to your original version which just takes two doubles.

1
  • I can use this if I need the actual value of T, but for this scenario I'm only evaluating double value property of different objects . Thanks...
    – CSharpNoob
    Sep 10, 2010 at 5:53
4

You can declare it simply as a Func<double> (that way you are not making the method dependent on the Foo type), and pass any method taking no parameters and returning a double as argument:

public static double ComputeBasicAmount(double basicLimit, Func<double> multiplier)
{
    return basicLimit * multiplier();
}

Some example calls:

class Foo
{
    public double One;
    public double Two;
}


Foo f = new Foo();
double result = ComputeBasicAmount(f.One, () => f.Two);

You can also have some other method returning a double

public static double GetDoubleValue()
{
    return 4.2;
}

...and pass that as argument:

double result = ComputeBasicAmount(42,GetDoubleValue);
3
  • can you do a Generic version of this, because its not FOO object what im going to pass. thanks
    – CSharpNoob
    Sep 10, 2010 at 5:31
  • oh man, I guess I don't have to use Generics here because I do not have to pass the Type... thanks man...
    – CSharpNoob
    Sep 10, 2010 at 5:32
  • @user444024: exactly. The method is already as generic as it gets, given that we always want to operate on double values. Sep 10, 2010 at 5:35
0

You should use a Func<double> since you only use the double result

public double ComputeBasicAmount(double basicLimit, Func<double> multiplier)
{    
    return basicLimt * multiplier();
}

Then call it like this

double basicAmt = ComputeBasicAmount<Foo>(foo.BasicLimit, x => x.EligibleAmt/x.RoomRate)

But then you could have a regular double parameter instead.

0

You'd declare your method something like this, so the multiplier is a delegate that takes a Foo object and returns a double:

double ComputeBasicAmount(
   double basicLimit, Foo foo, Func<Foo, double> multiplier)

Then call it like this, passing a lambda into the multiplier:

double basicAmt = ComputeBasicAmount(
   foo.BasicLimit, foo, x => x.EligibleAmt / x.RoomRate);
2
  • This isn't correct as a Foo instance is not being passed in so there's nothing for the ComputeBasicAmount to call the Func with. Sep 10, 2010 at 5:22
  • thanks but my method is the same as yours the difference is mine is Generic
    – CSharpNoob
    Sep 10, 2010 at 5:29
0

Thanks guys, With your help I was able to make my existing code much more readable and functional...

    class RNB
    {
        public RNB(double roomRate, double roomDays)
        {
            RoomRate = roomRate;
            RoomDays = roomDays;
        }

        public double RoomRate { get; set; }
        public double RoomDays { get; set; }
        public const double BasicLimit = 100;
    }

    class HMS
    {
        public double Amount { get; set; }
        public const double BasicLimit = 200;
    }

    public static double ComputeBasicAmount(double basicLimit, Func<double> multiplier)
    {
        return basicLimit * multiplier();
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        RNB rnb = new RNB(100, 2);
        double result = ComputeBasicAmount(RNB.BasicLimit, () => rnb.RoomDays * rnb.RoomRate);
        Console.WriteLine("RNB Basic Amt: " + result.ToString());

        HMS hms = new HMS() { Amount = 1000 };
        result = ComputeBasicAmount(HMS.BasicLimit, () => hms.Amount);
        Console.WriteLine("HMS Basic Amt: " + result.ToString());

        Console.Read();
    }

But I have another problem here.. I Want to eliminate the passing of the BasicLimit because i think it looks redundant here. Is it possible to put the BasicLimit inside the ComputeBasicAmount method

Something like this..

 public static double ComputeBasicAmount<T>(Func<T, double> multiplier, T obj)
  {

      return obj.BasicLimit * multiplier();
  }

But I have to put this question in another thread because I think its another topic... See you guys there... thanks...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.