0

I am trying to learn golang and i got a little piece of code that i do not understand why it gets stuck after some time.

package main

import "log"

func main() {
    deliveryChann := make(chan bool, 10000)

    go func() {
        for {
            deliveryChann <- true
            log.Println("Sent")
        }
    }()

    go func() {
        for {
            select {
            case <-deliveryChann:
                log.Println("received")
            }
        }
    }()

    go func() {
        for {
            select {
            case <-deliveryChann:
                log.Println("received")
            }
        }
    }()

    go func() {
        for {
            select {
            case <-deliveryChann:
                log.Println("received")
            }
        }
    }()

    for {
    }
}

An basic start on how to investigate would suffice.

0
2

The main goroutine (running the for {} loop) is hogging the thread, and none of the other goroutines are able to execute because of it. If you change the end of your main function to:

for {
    runtime.Gosched()
}

then the thread will be released and another goroutine made active.

func Gosched()

Gosched yields the processor, allowing other goroutines to run. It does not suspend the current goroutine, so execution resumes automatically.

-- https://golang.org/pkg/runtime/#Gosched

13
  • And the problem here - that shouldn't happen if GOMAXRPOCS is bigger than 1. for {} will lock only one thread, other goroutines can be scheduled on other threads. But for some reason that doesn't happen – creker Apr 24 '16 at 18:06
  • @creker - Yes, I wondered the same. I'm currently investigating why, as I am not sure of the cause. – icio Apr 24 '16 at 18:09
  • and even more puzzling the fact that it runs for some time before deadlocking. I would understand if it would lock up immediately and that would be perfectly fine. It would perfectly fit the case of for {} locking the process before the runtime had any chance to spawn more worker threads. – creker Apr 24 '16 at 18:15
  • Just for info: i am running the latest golang version, so gomaxprocs shouldnot be 1. I understand the issue with 1 cpu only (at least i do now), but for multiple cpus i am still at a loss. – Just Me Apr 24 '16 at 18:25
  • The behaviour that we're interested in is defined by the scheduler. The scheduler will only switch a thread's context when the current goroutine (i) finishes, (ii) makes a blocking syscall, (ii) makes a blocking Go runtime call; or (iv) invokes another function (somethines) (ref: slideshare.net/matthewrdale/demystifying-the-go-scheduler). I'm still a bit new to Go, but I'm wondering: perhaps context switches in otherwise-independent threads are dependent on the running threads invoking the scheduler. Our main goroutine won't ever invoke it. – icio Apr 24 '16 at 18:32
0

Order of execution of goroutings is undefined. Code gets stuck is legal. You can be more deterministic doing communication with main(). For example place

for {
   deliveryChann <- true
   log.Println("Sent")
}

in main() instead of go func()

2
  • Why would the order of operations matter? The channel is opened before any other routine runs. running latest version of go, so there is no issue with the number of cpus. (would love to understand how this happens). – Just Me Apr 24 '16 at 18:28
  • Maybe an example batter explain what I mean play.golang.org/p/lrbs5NCEck . And this is expected behaviour. – Uvelichitel Apr 24 '16 at 19:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.