103

Problem

PEP8 has a rule about putting imports at the top of a file:

Imports are always put at the top of the file, just after any module comments and docstrings, and before module globals and constants.

However, in certain cases, I might want to do something like:

import sys
sys.path.insert("..", 0)

import my_module

In this case, the pep8 command line utility flags my code:

E402 module level import not at top of file

What is the best way to achieve PEP8 compliance with sys.path modifications?

Why

I have this code because I'm following the project structure given in The Hitchhiker's Guide to Python.

That guide suggests that I have a my_module folder, separate from a tests folder, both of which are in the same directory. If I want to access my_module from tests, I think I need to add .. to the sys.path

7
  • 1
    Why don't you write a setup.py and actually install my_module for testing?
    – jonrsharpe
    Apr 24, 2016 at 19:40
  • Because that's slightly less convenient. I suppose I could but I'd rather not. Apr 24, 2016 at 19:42
  • 1
    For whom? If you ever want to actually use this project anywhere it's far and away the easiest way to get it up and running.
    – jonrsharpe
    Apr 24, 2016 at 19:42
  • 11
    From PEP8: "However, know when to be inconsistent -- sometimes style guide recommendations just aren't applicable. When in doubt, use your best judgment.". There are times when you have to break PEP8 compliance, and that is OK. Apr 24, 2016 at 19:47
  • 2
    @jonrsharpe It's a good habit to get into for future things that I will share. (I do see your point though, in that case I can use setup.py). I'll keep that in mind. Apr 24, 2016 at 19:47

8 Answers 8

110

If there are just a few imports, you can just ignore PEP8 on those import lines:

import sys
sys.path.insert("..", 0)
import my_module  # noqa: E402
3
  • 10
    I prefer to be more explicit, specifying the violated rule like # noqa: E402 for example. (source) Aug 30, 2018 at 13:53
  • @MaxGoodridge indeed! Edited response to add the rule.
    – astorga
    Oct 16, 2018 at 12:54
  • 3
    in case you have more than one import from the same path, i'ts shorter to put # noqa: E402 on the sys.path.insert... line
    – Ohad Cohen
    Nov 30, 2021 at 17:04
71

Often I have multiple files with tests in a subdirectory foo/tests of my project, while the modules I'm testing are in foo/src. To run the tests from foo/tests without import errors I create a file foo/tests/pathmagic.py that looks like this;

"""Path hack to make tests work."""

import os
import sys

bp = os.path.dirname(os.path.realpath('.')).split(os.sep)
modpath = os.sep.join(bp + ['src'])
sys.path.insert(0, modpath)

In every test file, I then use

import pathmagic  # noqa

as the first import. The "noqa" comment prevents pycodestyle/pep8 from complaining about an unused import.

7
  • 2
    This is cool, but this still have 'imported but unused [F401]' problem. Jul 19, 2017 at 2:01
  • 2
    I guess creating a dummy function in that pathmagic module and calling it from the test module would solve that issue but I wish there was something cleaner... Oct 14, 2017 at 3:49
  • 3
    @Chung-YenHung Keep in mind that pycodestyle/pep8 warnings are advisory rather than syntax errors or exceptions. You can choose to ignore them. I've updated my answer by adding a "noqa" comment after the import. Oct 14, 2017 at 7:04
  • One huge disadvantage of this, is turning your tests into a package so pathmagic can be importable. Most python test runners assume your tests are a collections of files not on sys.path, and changing that can leads to issues, see how pytest deals with these issues docs.pytest.org/en/latest/…
    – Meitham
    Jul 6, 2020 at 8:44
  • 1
    @Meitham Although my answer mentions how I used this to run tests back then, the question is not about running tests. (I have since moved to pytest for my tests.) In other situation this mechanism is still useful. Jul 6, 2020 at 17:33
12

There is another workaround.

import sys
... all your other imports...

sys.path.insert("..", 0)
try:
    import my_module
except:
    raise
3
  • 1
    I strongly believe this will not work. The reason being, there may be some modules imported under "... all your imports ..." which might require PYTHONPATH to be set first. Nov 1, 2017 at 17:50
  • 4
    @darkdefender27 the idea is to put all imports that requires PYTHONPATH inside try body and everything else (that does not depend on it) up above.
    – astorga
    Oct 16, 2018 at 12:52
  • or even simpler: if 1: import module
    – stason
    Aug 29, 2020 at 5:03
6

This problem already has several solutions that work, but in the case that you have a number of non-initial imports, and don't want to annotate each with # noqa: E402 (or use one of the other proposals), the following works for a whole block:

import sys
sys.path.insert("..", 0)

if True:  # noqa: E402
    import my_module_1
    import my_module_2
    ...
4

I've just struggled with a similar question, and I think I found a slightly nicer solution than the accepted answer.

Create a pathmagic module that does the actual sys.path manipulation, but make the change within a context manager:

"""Path hack to make tests work."""

import os
import sys

class context:
    def __enter__(self):
        bp = os.path.dirname(os.path.realpath('.')).split(os.sep)
        modpath = os.sep.join(bp + ['src'])
        sys.path.insert(0, modpath)

    def __exit__(self, *args):
        pass

Then, in your test files (or wherever you need this), you do:

import pathmagic

with pathmagic.context():
    import my_module
    # ...

This way you don't get any complaints from flake8/pycodestyle, you don't need special comments, and the structure seems to make sense.

For extra neatness, consider actually reverting the path in the __exit__ block, though this may cause problems with lazy imports (if you put the module code outside of the context), so maybe not worth the trouble.


EDIT: Just saw a much simpler trick in an answer to a different question: add assert pathmagic under your imports to avoid the noqa comment.

3
  • All this really accomplished is getting rid of the next for the special comment at the expense of requiring the use of a context manager—a somewhat nebulous tradeoff in my opinion. As for cleaning-up in the __exit__ block, to really do it properly would require just removing the added path (if it's still there) because restoring the entire previous value to what it was when the context was entered would also undo any other changes that might have been made to it by other code (executed in the same context) for some reason.
    – martineau
    Nov 30, 2017 at 16:58
  • @martineau indeed, it's a matter of taste. I may be a little biased against special comments, because my current code base contains a little too many comments for the myriad static analysis tools and editors that the various teams are using. Also agreed on your second point.
    – itsadok
    Nov 30, 2017 at 17:12
  • Problematic if pathmagic.context() can be called an arbitrary number of times (e.g. if running all tests). Reverting is problematic, too: any import at a later time (e.g. done on demand) can fail. Sep 21, 2019 at 16:55
4

Did you already try the following:

import sys
from importlib import import_module

sys.path.insert("..", 0)

# import module
my_mod = import_module('my_module')

# get method or function from my_mod
my_method = getattr(my_mod , 'my_method')
3

To comply with the pep8, you should include your project path to the python path in order to perform relative / absolute imports.

To do so, you can have a look at this answer: Permanently add a directory to PYTHONPATH

4
  • 3
    I don't want to make this directory accessible globally to all my Python scripts, because that could cause conflicts. Apr 24, 2016 at 19:41
  • 2
    You can use the docs.python.org/3/library/pkgutil.html package to use namespaces. If you think your solution is the best, you are not in obligation to follow the pep8. Pep8 is only advices and best practices, that don't mean you must follow every rule, everytime, everywhere. Apr 24, 2016 at 19:42
  • 2
    PEP 8 actually says A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.
    – zondo
    Apr 24, 2016 at 19:47
  • if only I didn't need to fight flake8 in git hooks and CI
    – rob
    Mar 28 at 14:38
3

Given that the path to be added is relative to the script, this can be solved by using relative path.

from ..mypath import mymodule 
from ..mypath.mysubfolder import anothermodule

Then do not need to use sys.path.insert() anymore. Lint stoped complaining.

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