26

I'm trying to prepare data for a graph using LINQ.

The problem that i cant solve is how to calculate the "difference to previous.

the result I expect is

ID= 1, Date= Now, DiffToPrev= 0;

ID= 1, Date= Now+1, DiffToPrev= 3;

ID= 1, Date= Now+2, DiffToPrev= 7;

ID= 1, Date= Now+3, DiffToPrev= -6;

etc...

Can You help me create such a query ?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public class MyObject
    {
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public DateTime Date { get; set; }
        public int Value { get; set; }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
               var list = new List<MyObject>
          {
            new MyObject {ID= 1,Date = DateTime.Now,Value = 5},
            new MyObject {ID= 1,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(1),Value = 8},
            new MyObject {ID= 1,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(2),Value = 15},
            new MyObject {ID= 1,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(3),Value = 9},
            new MyObject {ID= 1,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(4),Value = 12},
            new MyObject {ID= 1,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(5),Value = 25},
            new MyObject {ID= 2,Date = DateTime.Now,Value = 10},
            new MyObject {ID= 2,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(1),Value = 7},
            new MyObject {ID= 2,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(2),Value = 19},
            new MyObject {ID= 2,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(3),Value = 12},
            new MyObject {ID= 2,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(4),Value = 15},
            new MyObject {ID= 2,Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(5),Value = 18}

        };

            Console.WriteLine(list);   

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

7 Answers 7

76

One option (for LINQ to Objects) would be to create your own LINQ operator:

// I don't like this name :(
public static IEnumerable<TResult> SelectWithPrevious<TSource, TResult>
    (this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
     Func<TSource, TSource, TResult> projection)
{
    using (var iterator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!iterator.MoveNext())
        {
             yield break;
        }
        TSource previous = iterator.Current;
        while (iterator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return projection(previous, iterator.Current);
            previous = iterator.Current;
        }
    }
}

This enables you to perform your projection using only a single pass of the source sequence, which is always a bonus (imagine running it over a large log file).

Note that it will project a sequence of length n into a sequence of length n-1 - you may want to prepend a "dummy" first element, for example. (Or change the method to include one.)

Here's an example of how you'd use it:

var query = list.SelectWithPrevious((prev, cur) =>
     new { ID = cur.ID, Date = cur.Date, DateDiff = (cur.Date - prev.Date).Days) });

Note that this will include the final result of one ID with the first result of the next ID... you may wish to group your sequence by ID first.

19
  • This seems like a right answer, but i cant figure how to use it.
    – Marty
    Commented Sep 10, 2010 at 8:54
  • I guess this one would be more efficient than Branimir's answer, right ?
    – Marty
    Commented Sep 10, 2010 at 9:03
  • @Martynas: It's more general than Branimir's answer, and more efficient than Felix's.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Sep 10, 2010 at 9:33
  • 2
    That's a nice little function Jon; sweet and simple. Commented Dec 16, 2010 at 12:09
  • 1
    @NetMage: IEnumerator<T> does implement IDisposable, and you should always use it - just like foreach does implicitly. The non-generic version doesn't.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Mar 15, 2018 at 20:14
21

Use index to get previous object:

   var LinqList = list.Select( 
       (myObject, index) => 
          new { 
            ID = myObject.ID, 
            Date = myObject.Date, 
            Value = myObject.Value, 
            DiffToPrev = (index > 0 ? myObject.Value - list[index - 1].Value : 0)
          }
   );
7
  • @Martynas: Note that this isn't very general purpose though - it only works in scenarios where you can index into the collection.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Sep 10, 2010 at 9:34
  • 3
    @JonSkeet The OP has a list and didn't ask for general purpose, so this a superior answer.
    – Jim Balter
    Commented Jun 21, 2013 at 4:55
  • 2
    @JimBalter: The purpose of Stack Overflow is to serve more than just the OP's question. Sometimes it makes sense to stick strictly to the bounds of what's required (although I'd at least have formatted this code to avoid scrolling), but other times I think it's helpful to give more generally-useful approaches.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Jun 21, 2013 at 5:47
  • I like it: nice and simple, as the LINQ is supposed to be! @JonSkeet, Your custom operator has enriched my skills, and also provided good example of operating iterator. But myself and my fellow team members would like to have the code as simple and readable as possible.
    – Michael G
    Commented Dec 9, 2019 at 15:49
  • 1
    @MichaelG: I wouldn't particularly expect a significant performance difference - but SelectWithIndex requires the source to be accessible by index, whereas SelectWithPrevious doesn't.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Dec 11, 2019 at 9:49
8

In C#4 you can use the Zip method in order to process two items at a time. Like this:

        var list1 = list.Take(list.Count() - 1);
        var list2 = list.Skip(1);
        var diff = list1.Zip(list2, (item1, item2) => ...);
8

Modification of Jon Skeet's answer to not skip the first item:

public static IEnumerable<TResult> SelectWithPrev<TSource, TResult>
    (this IEnumerable<TSource> source, 
    Func<TSource, TSource, bool, TResult> projection)
{
    using (var iterator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        var isfirst = true;
        var previous = default(TSource);
        while (iterator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return projection(iterator.Current, previous, isfirst);
            isfirst = false;
            previous = iterator.Current;
        }
    }
}

A few key differences... passes a third bool parameter to indicate if it is the first element of the enumerable. I also switched the order of the current/previous parameters.

Here's the matching example:

var query = list.SelectWithPrevious((cur, prev, isfirst) =>
    new { 
        ID = cur.ID, 
        Date = cur.Date, 
        DateDiff = (isfirst ? cur.Date : cur.Date - prev.Date).Days);
    });
1
  • Hi @Edyn, thank you for this, any idea why Jon skip first row?, I supposed is something realted to the requeriment of the main post, but your update, really help me, thank! Commented Apr 8 at 23:18
3

Further to Felix Ungman's post above, below is an example of how you can achieve the data you need making use of Zip():

        var diffs = list.Skip(1).Zip(list,
            (curr, prev) => new { CurrentID = curr.ID, PreviousID = prev.ID, CurrDate = curr.Date, PrevDate = prev.Date, DiffToPrev = curr.Date.Day - prev.Date.Day })
            .ToList();

        diffs.ForEach(fe => Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Current ID: {0}, Previous ID: {1} Current Date: {2}, Previous Date: {3} Diff: {4}",
            fe.CurrentID, fe.PreviousID, fe.CurrDate, fe.PrevDate, fe.DiffToPrev)));

Basically, you are zipping two versions of the same list but the first version (the current list) begins at the 2nd element in the collection, otherwise a difference would always differ the same element, giving a difference of zero.

I hope this makes sense,

Dave

2

Yet another mod on Jon Skeet's version (thanks for your solution +1). Except this is returning an enumerable of tuples.

public static IEnumerable<Tuple<T, T>> Intermediate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    using (var iterator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!iterator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield break;
        }
        T previous = iterator.Current;
        while (iterator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return new Tuple<T, T>(previous, iterator.Current);
            previous = iterator.Current;
        }
    }
}

This is NOT returning the first because it's about returning the intermediate between items.

use it like:

public class MyObject
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    public int Value { get; set; }
}

var myObjectList = new List<MyObject>();

// don't forget to order on `Date`

foreach(var deltaItem in myObjectList.Intermediate())
{
    var delta = deltaItem.Second.Offset - deltaItem.First.Offset;
    // ..
}

OR

var newList = myObjectList.Intermediate().Select(item => item.Second.Date - item.First.Date);

OR (like jon shows)

var newList = myObjectList.Intermediate().Select(item => new 
{ 
    ID = item.Second.ID, 
    Date = item.Second.Date, 
    DateDiff = (item.Second.Date - item.First.Date).Days
});
2
  • Which Pair are you using? I don't see a public one in .Net?
    – NetMage
    Commented Mar 15, 2018 at 19:46
  • @NetMage My bad, you can replace it by Tuple. I've changed it. Thanks you. Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 7:44
2

Here is the refactored code with C# 7.2 using the readonly struct and the ValueTuple (also struct).

I use Zip() to create (CurrentID, PreviousID, CurrDate, PrevDate, DiffToPrev) tuple of 5 members. It is easily iterated with foreach:

foreach(var (CurrentID, PreviousID, CurrDate, PrevDate, DiffToPrev) in diffs)

The full code:

public readonly struct S
{
    public int ID { get; }
    public DateTime Date { get; }
    public int Value { get; }

    public S(S other) => this = other;

    public S(int id, DateTime date, int value)
    {
        ID = id;
        Date = date;
        Value = value;
    }

    public static void DumpDiffs(IEnumerable<S> list)
    {
        // Zip (or compare) list with offset 1 - Skip(1) - vs the original list
        // this way the items compared are i[j+1] vs i[j]
        // Note: the resulting enumeration will include list.Count-1 items
        var diffs = list.Skip(1)
                        .Zip(list, (curr, prev) => 
                                    (CurrentID: curr.ID, PreviousID: prev.ID, 
                                    CurrDate: curr.Date, PrevDate: prev.Date, 
                                    DiffToPrev: curr.Date.Day - prev.Date.Day));

        foreach(var (CurrentID, PreviousID, CurrDate, PrevDate, DiffToPrev) in diffs)
            Console.WriteLine($"Current ID: {CurrentID}, Previous ID: {PreviousID} " +
                              $"Current Date: {CurrDate}, Previous Date: {PrevDate} " +
                              $"Diff: {DiffToPrev}");
    }
}

Unit test output:

// the list:

// ID   Date
// ---------------
// 233  17-Feb-19
// 122  31-Mar-19
// 412  03-Mar-19
// 340  05-May-19
// 920  15-May-19

// CurrentID PreviousID CurrentDate PreviousDate Diff (days)
// ---------------------------------------------------------
//    122       233     31-Mar-19   17-Feb-19      14
//    412       122     03-Mar-19   31-Mar-19      -28
//    340       412     05-May-19   03-Mar-19      2
//    920       340     15-May-19   05-May-19      10

Note: the struct (especially readonly) performance is much better than that of a class.

Thanks @FelixUngman and @DavidHuxtable for their Zip() ideas!

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