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Can somebody please tell me what is the functionality of the outer for loop in the program below:

Mylist = [4,67,3,7,65,3,56,] 
maxLengthList = 7

print ('The all Number for Buble Sort is:', Mylist)

for i in range(len(Mylist)-1,0,-1):
    for j in range(i):
        if Mylist[j]>Mylist[j+1]:
            temp = Mylist[j]
            Mylist[j] = Mylist[j+1]
            Mylist[j+1] = temp


print('After Buble Sort the Number are:',Mylist)
  • Can't understand what exactly? Also, did you try Wikipedia? – MikeJRamsey56 Apr 25 '16 at 3:17
  • One of the buttons when you are writing the post is for formatting code. If you could edit your answer so that the code is formatted, then it will look normal and readable to all of us. – Mr. Me Apr 25 '16 at 3:18
  • Can't understand why the outer loop initialising,range and increment is like this: for i in range(len(Mylist)-1,0,-1).........The program is for bubble sorting – Raiyan Rabbani Apr 25 '16 at 3:19
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The for loop will step backward (-1) starting at 6 (len(Mylist)-1) and stopping at 1, the last value before stop (0). See range documentation range(start, stop, step)

>>> range(len(Mylist)-1, 0, -1)
[6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
  • Thank you very much! I understood now! Are there any good sites where there are these basics for beginners? – Raiyan Rabbani Apr 25 '16 at 3:31
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in the for i in range(len(Mylist)-1,0,-1): line, there are three arguments to the range function. len(Mylist)-1 tells us the upper value for our range. the 0 tells us the lower value for our range. the -1 is the size of the increments, meaning that instead of increasing by 1 each time we enter the loop, we are going to subtract one.

So we will start at the second to the last value in the loop. The len(Mylist)-1. We will subtract 1, The -1 part, each time we go through the for loop until we end up at 0

And for reference the documentation states.

range(stop)

range(start, stop[, step])

This is a versatile function to create lists containing arithmetic progressions. It is most often used in for loops. The arguments must be plain integers. If the step argument is omitted, it defaults to 1. If the start argument is omitted, it defaults to 0. The full form returns a list of plain integers [start, start + step, start + 2 * step, ...]. If step is positive, the last element is the largest start + i * step less than stop; if step is negative, the last element is the smallest start + i > * step greater than stop. step must not be zero (or else ValueError is raised).

Example:

>>>
>>> range(10)
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> range(1, 11)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> range(0, 30, 5)
[0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25]
>>> range(0, 10, 3)
[0, 3, 6, 9]
>>> range(0, -10, -1)
[0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, -9]
>>> range(0)
[]
>>> range(1, 0)
[]
  • Thank you very much! I just have one question.Why can't we use lower range starting from 0 and upper range till the last value i.e starting from 0 to the last value of the list. – Raiyan Rabbani Apr 25 '16 at 4:20
  • It's not necessary to do it that way because of the way the bubble sort algorithm works. After going through the loop len(Mylist)-1 times the list will already be sorted. If you analyze what happens with a tiny list, you'll see the list is sorted after the len(Mylist)-1 iteration. – Mr. Me Apr 25 '16 at 4:43

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