134

I'd like to handle the "Closing" event (when a user clicks the upper right 'X' button) of my window in order to eventually display a confirm message or/and cancel the closing.

I know how to do this in the code-behind : subscribe to the "Closing" event of the window then use the "CancelEventArgs.Cancel" property.

But I'm using MVVM so I'm not sure it's the good approach.

I think the good approach would be to bind the Closing event to a Command in my ViewModel.

I tried that :

    <i:Interaction.Triggers>
        <i:EventTrigger EventName="Closing">
            <cmd:EventToCommand Command="{Binding CloseCommand}" />
        </i:EventTrigger>
    </i:Interaction.Triggers>

With an associated RelayCommand in my ViewModel but it doesn't work (the command's code is not executed).

  • 3
    Also interested in nice answer to answer to this. – Sekhat Sep 27 '10 at 18:32
  • 3
    I downloaded the code from codeplex and debugging it revealed: "Unable to cast object of type 'System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs' to type 'System.Windows.RoutedEventArgs'." It works fine if you don't want the CancelEventArgs but that doesn't answer your question... – David Hollinshead Oct 13 '11 at 18:27
  • I'm guessing your code doesn't work because the control you attached your trigger to doesn't have a Closing event. Your data context is not a window...It's probably a data template with a grid or something, which has no Closing event. So dbkk's answer is the best answer in this case. However, I prefer the Interaction/EventTrigger approach when the event is available. – NielW Mar 11 '14 at 23:03
  • The code you have will work fine on a Loaded event, for example. – NielW Mar 11 '14 at 23:05

12 Answers 12

115

I would simply associate the handler in the View constructor:

MyWindow() 
{
    // Set up ViewModel, assign to DataContext etc.
    Closing += viewModel.OnWindowClosing;
}

Then add the handler to the ViewModel:

using System.ComponentModel;

public void OnWindowClosing(object sender, CancelEventArgs e) 
{
   // Handle closing logic, set e.Cancel as needed
}

In this case, you gain exactly nothing except complexity by using a more elaborate pattern with more indirection (5 extra lines of XML plus command pattern).

The "zero code-behind" mantra is not the goal in itself, the point is to decouple ViewModel from the View. Even when the event is bound in code-behind of the View, the ViewModel does not depend on the View and the closing logic can be unit-tested.

  • 4
    I like this solution: just hook into a hidden button :) – Benjol Apr 30 '13 at 6:48
  • 3
    For mvvm beginners not using MVVMLight and searching for how to inform the ViewModel about the Closing event, the links how to set up the dataContext correctly and how to get the viewModel object in the View may be interesting. How to get a reference to the ViewModel in the View? and How do I set a ViewModel on a window in xaml using datacontext property ...It took me several hours, how a simple window closing event could be handled in the ViewModel. – MarkusEgle Apr 3 '14 at 8:44
  • 15
    This solution is irrelevant in MVVM environment. The code behind shouldn't know about the ViewModel. – Jacob Oct 9 '14 at 4:50
  • 2
    @Jacob I think the problem is more that you get a form event handler in your ViewModel, which couples the ViewModel to a specific UI implementation. If they're going to use code behind, they should check CanExecute and then call Execute() on an ICommand property instead. – Evil Pigeon Nov 14 '14 at 3:50
  • 13
    @Jacob The code-behind can know about the ViewModel members just fine, just ike the XAML code does. Or what do you think you are doing when you create a Binding to a ViewModel property? This solution is perfectly fine for MVVM, as long as you don't handle the closing logic in the code-behind itself, but in the ViewModel (though using an ICommand, like EvilPigeon suggests, could be a good idea since you can also bind to it) – almulo Apr 14 '15 at 16:28
74

This code works just fine:

ViewModel.cs:

public ICommand WindowClosing
{
    get
    {
        return new RelayCommand<CancelEventArgs>(
            (args) =>{
                     });
    }
}

and in XAML:

<i:Interaction.Triggers>
    <i:EventTrigger EventName="Closing">
        <command:EventToCommand Command="{Binding WindowClosing}" PassEventArgsToCommand="True" />
    </i:EventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers>

assuming that

  • ViewModel is assigned to a DataContext of the main container.
  • xmlns:command="clr-namespace:GalaSoft.MvvmLight.Command;assembly=GalaSoft.MvvmLight.Extras.SL5"
  • xmlns:i="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Interactivity;assembly=System.Windows.Interactivity"
  • 1
    Forgot: to get event arguments in command use PassEventArgsToCommand="True" – Stas Nov 4 '10 at 6:47
  • 1
    +1 simple and conventional approach. Would be even better to head over to PRISM. – Tri Q Tran Nov 11 '10 at 4:28
  • 14
    This is one scenario that highlights gaping holes in WPF and MVVM. – Damien Apr 11 '11 at 4:23
  • 13
    What is the reference to "command:"? What does this mean? – CoderForHire Jan 16 '13 at 2:12
  • 1
    It would be really helpful to mention what is i in <i:Interaction.Triggers> and how to get it. – Andrii Muzychuk Mar 4 '16 at 21:18
33

This option is even easier, and maybe is suitable for you. In your View Model constructor, you can subscribe the Main Window closing event like this:

Application.Current.MainWindow.Closing += new CancelEventHandler(MainWindow_Closing);

void MainWindow_Closing(object sender, CancelEventArgs e)
{
            //Your code to handle the event
}

All the best.

  • This is the best solution among the other mentioned in this issue. Thank you ! – Jacob Oct 9 '14 at 4:55
  • This is what i was looking for. Thanks! – Nikki Punjabi Feb 25 '16 at 14:49
  • Why then people use more cumbersome methods while there is such a straightforward approach? Thanks. – Saeid Apr 24 '16 at 19:53
  • 14
    ... and this creates tight coupling between ViewModel and View. -1. – PiotrK Apr 25 '16 at 23:11
  • 3
    This is not the best answer. It breaks MVVM. – Safiron Mar 21 '17 at 12:47
11

Here is an answer according to the MVVM-pattern if you don't want to know about the Window (or any of its event) in the ViewModel.

public interface IClosing
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Executes when window is closing
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Whether the windows should be closed by the caller</returns>
    bool OnClosing();
}

In the ViewModel add the interface and implementation

public bool OnClosing()
{
    bool close = true;

    //Ask whether to save changes och cancel etc
    //close = false; //If you want to cancel close

    return close;
}

In the Window I add the Closing event. This code behind doesn't break the MVVM pattern. The View can know about the viewmodel!

void Window_Closing(object sender, System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e)
{
    IClosing context = DataContext as IClosing;
    if (context != null)
    {
        e.Cancel = !context.OnClosing();
    }
}
  • Simple, clear, and clean. The ViewModel need not know specifics of the view, hence concerns stay separated. – Bernhard Hiller May 28 '15 at 6:35
  • just used this, thanks! – PmanAce Feb 28 '18 at 15:02
10

Geez, seems like a lot of code going on here for this. Stas above had the right approach for minimal effort. Here is my adaptation (using MVVMLight but should be recognizable)... Oh and the PassEventArgsToCommand="True" is definitely needed as indicated above.

(credit to Laurent Bugnion http://blog.galasoft.ch/archive/2009/10/18/clean-shutdown-in-silverlight-and-wpf-applications.aspx)

   ... MainWindow Xaml
   ...
   WindowStyle="ThreeDBorderWindow" 
    WindowStartupLocation="Manual">



<i:Interaction.Triggers>
    <i:EventTrigger EventName="Closing">
        <cmd:EventToCommand Command="{Binding WindowClosingCommand}" PassEventArgsToCommand="True" />
    </i:EventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers> 

In the view model:

///<summary>
///  public RelayCommand<CancelEventArgs> WindowClosingCommand
///</summary>
public RelayCommand<CancelEventArgs> WindowClosingCommand { get; private set; }
 ...
 ...
 ...
        // Window Closing
        WindowClosingCommand = new RelayCommand<CancelEventArgs>((args) =>
                                                                      {
                                                                          ShutdownService.MainWindowClosing(args);
                                                                      },
                                                                      (args) => CanShutdown);

in the ShutdownService

    /// <summary>
    ///   ask the application to shutdown
    /// </summary>
    public static void MainWindowClosing(CancelEventArgs e)
    {
        e.Cancel = true;  /// CANCEL THE CLOSE - let the shutdown service decide what to do with the shutdown request
        RequestShutdown();
    }

RequestShutdown looks something like the following but basicallyRequestShutdown or whatever it is named decides whether to shutdown the application or not (which will merrily close the window anyway):

...
...
...
    /// <summary>
    ///   ask the application to shutdown
    /// </summary>
    public static void RequestShutdown()
    {

        // Unless one of the listeners aborted the shutdown, we proceed.  If they abort the shutdown, they are responsible for restarting it too.

        var shouldAbortShutdown = false;
        Logger.InfoFormat("Application starting shutdown at {0}...", DateTime.Now);
        var msg = new NotificationMessageAction<bool>(
            Notifications.ConfirmShutdown,
            shouldAbort => shouldAbortShutdown |= shouldAbort);

        // recipients should answer either true or false with msg.execute(true) etc.

        Messenger.Default.Send(msg, Notifications.ConfirmShutdown);

        if (!shouldAbortShutdown)
        {
            // This time it is for real
            Messenger.Default.Send(new NotificationMessage(Notifications.NotifyShutdown),
                                   Notifications.NotifyShutdown);
            Logger.InfoFormat("Application has shutdown at {0}", DateTime.Now);
            Application.Current.Shutdown();
        }
        else
            Logger.InfoFormat("Application shutdown aborted at {0}", DateTime.Now);
    }
    }
8

The asker should use STAS answer, but for readers who use prism and no galasoft/mvvmlight, they may want to try what I used:

In the definition at the top for window or usercontrol, etc define namespace:

xmlns:i="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Interactivity;assembly=System.Windows.Interactivity"

And just below that definition:

<i:Interaction.Triggers>
        <i:EventTrigger EventName="Closing">
            <i:InvokeCommandAction Command="{Binding WindowClosing}" CommandParameter="{Binding}" />
        </i:EventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers>

Property in your viewmodel:

public ICommand WindowClosing { get; private set; }

Attach delegatecommand in your viewmodel constructor:

this.WindowClosing = new DelegateCommand<object>(this.OnWindowClosing);

Finally, your code you want to reach on close of the control/window/whatever:

private void OnWindowClosing(object obj)
        {
            //put code here
        }
  • 2
    This does not give access to the CancelEventArgs which is necessary to cancel the closing event. The object passed is the view model, which technically is the same view model that the WindowClosing command is being executed from. – stephenbayer Aug 17 '15 at 23:01
  • Thanks for showing where to get i! – Andrii Muzychuk Mar 4 '16 at 21:21
4

I would be tempted to use an event handler within your App.xaml.cs file that will allow you to decide on whether to close the application or not.

For example you could then have something like the following code in your App.xaml.cs file:

protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnStartup(e);
    // Create the ViewModel to attach the window to
    MainWindow window = new MainWindow();
    var viewModel = new MainWindowViewModel();

    // Create the handler that will allow the window to close when the viewModel asks.
    EventHandler handler = null;
    handler = delegate
    {
        //***Code here to decide on closing the application****
        //***returns resultClose which is true if we want to close***
        if(resultClose == true)
        {
            viewModel.RequestClose -= handler;
            window.Close();
        }
    }
    viewModel.RequestClose += handler;

    window.DataContaxt = viewModel;

    window.Show();

}

Then within your MainWindowViewModel code you could have the following:

#region Fields
RelayCommand closeCommand;
#endregion

#region CloseCommand
/// <summary>
/// Returns the command that, when invoked, attempts
/// to remove this workspace from the user interface.
/// </summary>
public ICommand CloseCommand
{
    get
    {
        if (closeCommand == null)
            closeCommand = new RelayCommand(param => this.OnRequestClose());

        return closeCommand;
    }
}
#endregion // CloseCommand

#region RequestClose [event]

/// <summary>
/// Raised when this workspace should be removed from the UI.
/// </summary>
public event EventHandler RequestClose;

/// <summary>
/// If requested to close and a RequestClose delegate has been set then call it.
/// </summary>
void OnRequestClose()
{
    EventHandler handler = this.RequestClose;
    if (handler != null)
    {
        handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}

#endregion // RequestClose [event]
  • 1
    Thanks for the detailed answer. However, I don't think that solves my problem: I need to handle the window closing when the user clicks the upper right 'X' button. It would be easy to do this in the code-behind (i'd just link the Closing event and set the CancelEventArgs.Cancel to true of false) but I'd like to do this in MVVM style. Sorry for the confusion – Olivier Payen Sep 13 '10 at 15:41
1

Basically, window event may not be assigned to MVVM. In general, the Close button show a Dialog box to ask the user "save : yes/no/cancel", and this may not be achieved by the MVVM.

You may keep the OnClosing event handler, where you call the Model.Close.CanExecute() and set the boolean result in the event property. So after the CanExecute() call if true, OR in the OnClosed event, call the Model.Close.Execute()

1

I haven't done much testing with this but it seems to work. Here's what I came up with:

namespace OrtzIRC.WPF
{
    using System;
    using System.Windows;
    using OrtzIRC.WPF.ViewModels;

    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for App.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class App : Application
    {
        private MainViewModel viewModel = new MainViewModel();
        private MainWindow window = new MainWindow();

        protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnStartup(e);

            viewModel.RequestClose += ViewModelRequestClose;

            window.DataContext = viewModel;
            window.Closing += Window_Closing;
            window.Show();
        }

        private void ViewModelRequestClose(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            viewModel.RequestClose -= ViewModelRequestClose;
            window.Close();
        }

        private void Window_Closing(object sender, System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e)
        {
            window.Closing -= Window_Closing;
            viewModel.RequestClose -= ViewModelRequestClose; //Otherwise Close gets called again
            viewModel.CloseCommand.Execute(null);
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    What will happen here in the scenario where the V-M wishes to cancel the closing? – Tri Q Tran Nov 11 '10 at 4:31
1

We use AttachedCommandBehavior for this. You can attach any event to a command on your view model avoiding any code behind.

We use it throughout our solution and have almost zero code behind

http://marlongrech.wordpress.com/2008/12/13/attachedcommandbehavior-v2-aka-acb/

1

Using MVVM Light Toolkit:

Assuming that there is an Exit command in view model:

ICommand _exitCommand;
public ICommand ExitCommand
{
    get
    {
        if (_exitCommand == null)
            _exitCommand = new RelayCommand<object>(call => OnExit());
        return _exitCommand;
    }
}

void OnExit()
{
     var msg = new NotificationMessageAction<object>(this, "ExitApplication", (o) =>{});
     Messenger.Default.Send(msg);
}

This is received in the view:

Messenger.Default.Register<NotificationMessageAction<object>>(this, (m) => if (m.Notification == "ExitApplication")
{
     Application.Current.Shutdown();
});

On the other hand, I handle Closing event in MainWindow, using the instance of ViewModel:

private void Window_Closing(object sender, System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e)
{ 
    if (((ViewModel.MainViewModel)DataContext).CancelBeforeClose())
        e.Cancel = true;
}

CancelBeforeClose checks the current state of view model and returns true if closing should be stopped.

Hope it helps someone.

-2
private void Window_Closing(object sender, System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("closing");
    }

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