As a part of hashing, I need to convert a function pointer to a string representation. With global/static functions it's trivial:

string s1{ to_string(reinterpret_cast<uintptr_t>(&global)) };

And from here:

2) Any pointer can be converted to any integral type large enough to hold the value of the pointer (e.g. to std::uintptr_t)

But I have a problems with member functions:

cout << &MyStruct::member;

outputs 1 though in debugger I can see the address.

string s{ to_string(reinterpret_cast<uintptr_t>(&MyStruct::member)) };

Gives a compile-time error cannot convert. So it seems that not any pointer can be converted.

What else can I do to get a string representation?

  • 1 might well be the correct value. Member function pointers are relative, after all. Which also means that you might run into a lot of collisions if you don't add additional information like the hash of the typeid of the type itself. And when you say that not any pointer can be converted, bear in mind that member function pointers are not pointers; they are precisely member function pointers. – Bartek Banachewicz Apr 25 '16 at 8:56
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    "So it seems that not any pointer can be converted. ..." A pointer is not the same thing as a pointer to member, pointers can be converted to an integral type, pointers to member can't. – user657267 Apr 25 '16 at 8:58
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    There is no operator << for pointer-to-member. &MyStruct::member is a non-null pointer-to-member. Any pointer can be implicitly converted to bool. Non-null pointers convert to true, which print as 1 by default. – molbdnilo Apr 25 '16 at 8:59
  • @BartekBanachewicz "Member function pointers are relative, after all." Not in most implementations. That would break all kinds of sane code if you change things in a class definition. Non-virtual member function pointers are typically a function pointer + additional info for adjusting the this pointer. As others have pointed out, 1 is the result of converting a non-null pointer-to-member to bool. – Jonathan Wakely Apr 25 '16 at 11:18
up vote 4 down vote accepted
cout << &MyStruct::member;

outputs 1 though in debugger I can see the address.

There is no overload for ostream::operator<<(decltype(&MyStruct::member)). However, the member function pointer is implicitly convertible to bool and for that, there exists an overload and that is the best match for overload resolution. The converted value is true if the pointer is not null. true is output as 1.


string s{ to_string(reinterpret_cast<uintptr_t>(&MyStruct::member)) };

Gives a compile-time error cannot convert. So it seems that not any pointer can be converted.

Perhaps confusingly, in standardese pointer is not an umbrella term for object pointers, pointers-to-members, pointers-to-functions and pointers-to-member-functions. Pointers mean just data pointers specifically.

So, the quoted rule does not apply to pointers-to-member-functions. It only applies to (object) pointers.


What else can I do to get a string representation?

You can use a buffer of unsigned char, big enough to represent the pointer, and use std::memcpy. Then print it in the format of your own choice. I recommend hexadecimal.

As Martin Bonner points out, the pointer-to-member may contain padding in which case two values that point to the same member may actually have a different value in the buffer. Therefore the printed value is not of much use because two values are not comparable without knowing which bits (if any) are padding - which is implementation defined.


Unfortunately I need a robust solution so because of this padding I can't use.

No portable robust solution exists.

As Jonathan Wakely points out, there is no padding in the Itanium ABI, so if your compiler uses that, then the suggested memcpy method would work.

  • There is a risk that some of the data of a pointer-to-member is ignored padding space. In that case, different variables containing a pointer to the same member might have different padding values - and printing this out in hex would (incorrectly) yield a different hash. I'm not sure this is a problem which can be solved (in general) without compiler support. (In practise of course, your suggestion will probably work.) – Martin Bonner Apr 25 '16 at 10:26
  • @MartinBonner good point. I hadn't considered what nikitablack might be using the string representation for. – user2079303 Apr 25 '16 at 11:05
  • Thank you. Unfortunately I need a robust solution so because of this padding I can't use. Moreover, I don't know how to copy it. memcpy accepts void* as source but pointer-to-member can't be converted to it. – nikitablack Apr 25 '16 at 11:16
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    @nikitablack if you want to copy the bits of a member pointer then you want the address of a variable that holds its value, not the address of the member function itself. So auto mp = &Foo::bar; void* vp = &mp;, not void* vp = &Foo::bar; – Jonathan Wakely Apr 25 '16 at 11:22
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    For implementations that use the common Itanium C++ ABI there is no padding, see mentorembedded.github.io/cxx-abi/abi.html#member-pointers for the implementation details. – Jonathan Wakely Apr 25 '16 at 11:27

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