24

All the data types in pyspark.sql.types are:

__all__ = [
    "DataType", "NullType", "StringType", "BinaryType", "BooleanType", "DateType",
    "TimestampType", "DecimalType", "DoubleType", "FloatType", "ByteType", "IntegerType",
    "LongType", "ShortType", "ArrayType", "MapType", "StructField", "StructType"]

I have to write a UDF (in pyspark) which returns an array of tuples. What do I give the second argument to it which is the return type of the udf method? It would be something on the lines of ArrayType(TupleType())...

2
  • Your title question doesn't appear to match the body. Doesn't the documentation tell you how to set a return value to be "container type of other type"?
    – jonrsharpe
    Apr 25, 2016 at 12:32
  • @jonrsharpe I have changed the title. Hopefully it's representative of the body now.
    – kamalbanga
    Apr 25, 2016 at 12:54

3 Answers 3

38

There is no such thing as a TupleType in Spark. Product types are represented as structs with fields of specific type. For example if you want to return an array of pairs (integer, string) you can use schema like this:

from pyspark.sql.types import *

schema = ArrayType(StructType([
    StructField("char", StringType(), False),
    StructField("count", IntegerType(), False)
]))

Example usage:

from pyspark.sql.functions import udf
from collections import Counter

char_count_udf = udf(
    lambda s: Counter(s).most_common(),
    schema
)

df = sc.parallelize([(1, "foo"), (2, "bar")]).toDF(["id", "value"])

df.select("*", char_count_udf(df["value"])).show(2, False)

## +---+-----+-------------------------+
## |id |value|PythonUDF#<lambda>(value)|
## +---+-----+-------------------------+
## |1  |foo  |[[o,2], [f,1]]           |
## |2  |bar  |[[r,1], [a,1], [b,1]]    |
## +---+-----+-------------------------+
3
  • Your answer is working, but my case is a bit complex. My return data is of the type [('a1', [('b1', 1), ('b2', 2)]), ('a2', [('b1', 1), ('b2', 2)])] and so I make a type as ArrayType(StructType([StructField("date", StringType(), False), ArrayType(StructType([StructField("hashId", StringType(), False), StructField("TimeSpent-Front", FloatType(), False), StructField("TimeSpent-Back", FloatType(), False)]))])) which gives 'ArrayType' object has no attribute 'name'...
    – kamalbanga
    Apr 25, 2016 at 13:48
  • 1
    StructType requires an sequence of StructFields hence you cannot use ArrayTypes alone. You need StructField which stores ArrayType. Also word of advice - if you find yourself creating structures like this you should probably rethink data model. Deeply nested structures are hard to handle without UDFs and Python UDFs are far from efficient.
    – zero323
    Apr 25, 2016 at 13:58
  • How can I just specify schema in udf to return a list . F.udf(lambda start_date, end_date : [0,1] if start_date < end_date else [1]).
    – pseudocode
    Oct 21, 2016 at 18:13
15

Stackoverflow keeps directing me to this question, so I guess I'll add some info here.

Returning simple types from UDF:

from pyspark.sql.types import *
from pyspark.sql import functions as F

def get_df():
  d = [(0.0, 0.0), (0.0, 3.0), (1.0, 6.0), (1.0, 9.0)]
  df = sqlContext.createDataFrame(d, ['x', 'y'])
  return df

df = get_df()
df.show()

# +---+---+
# |  x|  y|
# +---+---+
# |0.0|0.0|
# |0.0|3.0|
# |1.0|6.0|
# |1.0|9.0|
# +---+---+

func = udf(lambda x: str(x), StringType())
df = df.withColumn('y_str', func('y'))

func = udf(lambda x: int(x), IntegerType())
df = df.withColumn('y_int', func('y'))

df.show()

# +---+---+-----+-----+
# |  x|  y|y_str|y_int|
# +---+---+-----+-----+
# |0.0|0.0|  0.0|    0|
# |0.0|3.0|  3.0|    3|
# |1.0|6.0|  6.0|    6|
# |1.0|9.0|  9.0|    9|
# +---+---+-----+-----+

df.printSchema()

# root
#  |-- x: double (nullable = true)
#  |-- y: double (nullable = true)
#  |-- y_str: string (nullable = true)
#  |-- y_int: integer (nullable = true)

When integers are not enough:

df = get_df()

func = udf(lambda x: [0]*int(x), ArrayType(IntegerType()))
df = df.withColumn('list', func('y'))

func = udf(lambda x: {float(y): str(y) for y in range(int(x))}, 
           MapType(FloatType(), StringType()))
df = df.withColumn('map', func('y'))

df.show()
# +---+---+--------------------+--------------------+
# |  x|  y|                list|                 map|
# +---+---+--------------------+--------------------+
# |0.0|0.0|                  []|               Map()|
# |0.0|3.0|           [0, 0, 0]|Map(2.0 -> 2, 0.0...|
# |1.0|6.0|  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]|Map(0.0 -> 0, 5.0...|
# |1.0|9.0|[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0...|Map(0.0 -> 0, 5.0...|
# +---+---+--------------------+--------------------+

df.printSchema()
# root
#  |-- x: double (nullable = true)
#  |-- y: double (nullable = true)
#  |-- list: array (nullable = true)
#  |    |-- element: integer (containsNull = true)
#  |-- map: map (nullable = true)
#  |    |-- key: float
#  |    |-- value: string (valueContainsNull = true)

Returning complex datatypes from UDF:

df = get_df()
df = df.groupBy('x').agg(F.collect_list('y').alias('y[]'))
df.show()

# +---+----------+
# |  x|       y[]|
# +---+----------+
# |0.0|[0.0, 3.0]|
# |1.0|[9.0, 6.0]|
# +---+----------+

schema = StructType([
    StructField("min", FloatType(), True),
    StructField("size", IntegerType(), True),
    StructField("edges",  ArrayType(FloatType()), True),
    StructField("val_to_index",  MapType(FloatType(), IntegerType()), True)
    # StructField('insanity', StructType([StructField("min_", FloatType(), True), StructField("size_", IntegerType(), True)]))

])

def func(values):
  mn = min(values)
  size = len(values)
  lst = sorted(values)[::-1]
  val_to_index = {x: i for i, x in enumerate(values)}
  return (mn, size, lst, val_to_index)

func = udf(func, schema)
dff = df.select('*', func('y[]').alias('complex_type'))
dff.show(10, False)

# +---+----------+------------------------------------------------------+
# |x  |y[]       |complex_type                                          |
# +---+----------+------------------------------------------------------+
# |0.0|[0.0, 3.0]|[0.0,2,WrappedArray(3.0, 0.0),Map(0.0 -> 0, 3.0 -> 1)]|
# |1.0|[6.0, 9.0]|[6.0,2,WrappedArray(9.0, 6.0),Map(9.0 -> 1, 6.0 -> 0)]|
# +---+----------+------------------------------------------------------+

dff.printSchema()

# +---+----------+------------------------------------------------------+
# |x  |y[]       |complex_type                                          |
# +---+----------+------------------------------------------------------+
# |0.0|[0.0, 3.0]|[0.0,2,WrappedArray(3.0, 0.0),Map(0.0 -> 0, 3.0 -> 1)]|
# |1.0|[6.0, 9.0]|[6.0,2,WrappedArray(9.0, 6.0),Map(9.0 -> 1, 6.0 -> 0)]|
# +---+----------+------------------------------------------------------+

Passing multiple arguments to a UDF:

df = get_df()
func = udf(lambda arr: arr[0]*arr[1],FloatType())
df = df.withColumn('x*y', func(F.array('x', 'y')))

    # +---+---+---+
    # |  x|  y|x*y|
    # +---+---+---+
    # |0.0|0.0|0.0|
    # |0.0|3.0|0.0|
    # |1.0|6.0|6.0|
    # |1.0|9.0|9.0|
    # +---+---+---+

The code is purely for demo purposes, all above transformation are available in Spark code and would yield much better performance. As @zero323 in the comment above, UDFs should generally be avoided in pyspark; returning complex types should make you think about simplifying your logic.

1

For the scala version instead of python. version 2.4

import org.apache.spark.sql.types._

val testschema : StructType = StructType(
    StructField("number", IntegerType) ::
    StructField("Array",  ArrayType(StructType(StructField("cnt_rnk", IntegerType) :: StructField("comp", StringType) :: Nil))) :: 
    StructField("comp", StringType):: Nil)

The tree structure looks like this.

testschema.printTreeString
root
 |-- number: integer (nullable = true)
 |-- Array: array (nullable = true)
 |    |-- element: struct (containsNull = true)
 |    |    |-- cnt_rnk: integer (nullable = true)
 |    |    |-- corp_id: string (nullable = true)
 |-- comp: string (nullable = true)

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