6

Consider the following hypothetical nonsensical ClojureScript function:

(defn tmp [] 
  (def p 0)
  (set! p (inc p))
  (set! p (inc p))
  (set! p (inc p)))

Repeatedly executing this function in a REPL results in

3
6
9
etc.

Is it possible to create a mutable variable which is local to the function, such that the output would have been

3
3
3
etc. 

in the case of repeated exection of (tmp)?

1 Answer 1

9

let lets you assign variables limited to it's scope:

(defn tmp[]
  (let [p 0]
    ...))

Now, clojurescript makes use of immutable data. That means everything is basically a constant, and once you set a value of p, there is no changing it. There are two ways you can get around this:

Use more local variables

(defn tmp[]
  (let [a 0
        b (inc a)
        c (inc b)
        d (inc c)]
    ...))

Use an atom

Atoms are somewhat different from other data structures in clojurescript and allow control of their state. Basically, you can see them as a reference to your value.

When creating an atom, you pass the initial value as its argument. You can access an atoms value by adding @ in front of the variable, which is actually a macro for (deref my-var).

You can change the value of an atom using swap! and reset! functions. Find out more about them in the cljs cheatsheet.

(defn tmp[]
  (let [p (atom 0)]
    (reset! p (inc @p))
    (reset! p (inc @p))
    (reset! p (inc @p))))

Hope this helps.

5
  • I tried this of course, but I got this error: clojure.lang.ExceptionInfo: Can't set! local var or non-mutable field at line 3 <cljs repl> - I added 'mutable' to the title but the term was in the question. - Who upvotes an answer which is not correct? Apr 25, 2016 at 17:31
  • 1
    I thought you might be aware of that since you described your code as partly non-sense. Anyway, I updated my answer to cover all of it. Apr 25, 2016 at 17:41
  • Thanks, the addition of more local variables would not work in the case I have at hand. A local atom would do the job though, I will try that solution right away. Apr 25, 2016 at 17:50
  • wow really! what a silly language. local atom worked but seems kind of weird. is that an expensive operation by using an atom? the equivalent of this String filename = null; try { possibly set filename } finally { if (filename != null) new File(filename).delete() } is quite hard to do in clojure Jul 12, 2018 at 23:43
  • 1
    @NicholasDiPiazza why would you "possibly set filename"? Usually there are ways in Clojure to do things without using mutable variables like the String filename. And if you really need one you can use an atom. Atom performance is fine. It uses Java code to manage shared, synchronous, independent state (e.g., you don't have to do to locking yourself when working with concurrent code). Dec 30, 2018 at 22:59

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