21

I'm having trouble figuring out how to correctly use sync.Cond. From what I can tell, a race condition exists between locking the Locker and invoking the condition's Wait method. This example adds an artificial delay between the two lines in the main goroutine to simulate the race condition:

package main

import (
    "sync"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    m := sync.Mutex{}
    c := sync.NewCond(&m)
    go func() {
        time.Sleep(1 * time.Second)
        c.Broadcast()
    }()
    m.Lock()
    time.Sleep(2 * time.Second)
    c.Wait()
}

[Run on the Go Playground]

This causes an immediate panic:

fatal error: all goroutines are asleep - deadlock!

goroutine 1 [semacquire]:
sync.runtime_Syncsemacquire(0x10330208, 0x1)
    /usr/local/go/src/runtime/sema.go:241 +0x2e0
sync.(*Cond).Wait(0x10330200, 0x0)
    /usr/local/go/src/sync/cond.go:63 +0xe0
main.main()
    /tmp/sandbox301865429/main.go:17 +0x1a0

What am I doing wrong? How do I avoid this apparent race condition? Is there a better synchronization construct I should be using?


Edit: I realize I should have better explained the problem I'm trying to solve here. I have a long-running goroutine that downloads a large file and a number of other goroutines that need access to the HTTP headers when they are available. This problem is harder than it sounds.

I can't use channels since only one goroutine would then receive the value. And some of the other goroutines would be trying to retrieve the headers long after they are already available.

The downloader goroutine could simply store the HTTP headers in a variable and use a mutex to safeguard access to them. However, this doesn't provide a way for the other goroutines to "wait" for them to become available.

I had thought that both a sync.Mutex and sync.Cond together could accomplish this goal but it appears that this is not possible.

17

OP answered his own, but did not directly answer the original question, I am going to post how to correctly use sync.Cond.

You do not really need sync.Cond if you have one goroutine for each write and read - a single sync.Mutex would suffice to communicate between them. sync.Cond could useful in situations where multiple readers wait for the shared resources to be available.

var sharedRsc = make(map[string]interface{})
func main() {
    var wg sync.WaitGroup
    wg.Add(2)
    m := sync.Mutex{}
    c := sync.NewCond(&m)
    go func() {
        // this go routine wait for changes to the sharedRsc
        c.L.Lock()
        for len(sharedRsc) == 0 {
            c.Wait()
        }
        fmt.Println(sharedRsc["rsc1"])
        c.L.Unlock()
        wg.Done()
    }()

    go func() {
        // this go routine wait for changes to the sharedRsc
        c.L.Lock()
        for len(sharedRsc) == 0 {
            c.Wait()
        }
        fmt.Println(sharedRsc["rsc2"])
        c.L.Unlock()
        wg.Done()
    }()

    // this one writes changes to sharedRsc
    c.L.Lock()
    sharedRsc["rsc1"] = "foo"
    sharedRsc["rsc2"] = "bar"
    c.Broadcast()
    c.L.Unlock()
    wg.Wait()
}

Playground

Having said that, using channels is still the recommended way to pass data around if the situation permitting.

Note: sync.WaitGroup here is only used to wait for the goroutines to complete their executions.

  • 1
    not sure if those for loops are really needed. I know the documentation suggests something like that but, it seems unnecessary. An if should suffice since it change sharedRsc in the possession of the lock and as stated by the documentation, the Wait only resumes after a call to Broadcast or Signal – cpr4t3s Feb 12 at 21:57
  • 1
    @cpr4t3s In this example, sure. In general, it's good habit/practice since, in a Broadcast() scenario, the first goroutine wakes, changes state, and then the others resume (with the shared state now altered). I agree with you and are absolutely correct in cases where it is not possible for any one of the waiting goroutines to affect the dependent condition(s). – Drew O'Meara Apr 10 at 21:51
8

You need to make sure that c.Broadcast is called after your call to c.Wait. The correct version of your program would be:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
)

func main() {
    m := &sync.Mutex{}
    c := sync.NewCond(m)
    m.Lock()
    go func() {
        m.Lock() // Wait for c.Wait()
        c.Broadcast()
        m.Unlock()
    }()
    c.Wait() // Unlocks m
}

https://play.golang.org/p/O1r8v8yW6h

2
package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    m := sync.Mutex{}
    m.Lock() // main gouroutine is owner of lock
    c := sync.NewCond(&m)
    go func() {
        m.Lock() // obtain a lock
        defer m.Unlock()
        fmt.Println("3. goroutine is owner of lock")
        time.Sleep(2 * time.Second) // long computing - because you are the owner, you can change state variable(s)
        c.Broadcast()               // State has been changed, publish it to waiting goroutines
        fmt.Println("4. goroutine will release lock soon (deffered Unlock")
    }()
    fmt.Println("1. main goroutine is owner of lock")
    time.Sleep(1 * time.Second) // initialization
    fmt.Println("2. main goroutine is still lockek")
    c.Wait() // Wait temporarily release a mutex during wating and give opportunity to other goroutines to change the state.
    // Because you don't know, whether this is state, that you are waiting for, is usually called in loop.
    m.Unlock()
    fmt.Println("Done")
}

http://play.golang.org/p/fBBwoL7_pm

  • What if it isn't possible to lock the mutex before launching the goroutine? For example, there may be other goroutines calling Wait(). – Nathan Osman Apr 26 '16 at 8:34
  • Than is possible, that when Broadcast is called, no other goroutine will be notified. It also fine - but what we both don't mentioned - usually condition is connected with some state. And Wait means - I cannot continue while system is in this state, wait. And Broadcast means - state is changed, everyone who has been waiting should check whether he can continue. Please describe more precisely what is computed in both goroutines, and why they have to communicate to each other. – lofcek Apr 26 '16 at 9:44
  • Sorry, I should have gone into more detail in the original question. I've added an edit that describes precisely what I'm trying to do. – Nathan Osman Apr 26 '16 at 16:13
  • I'm trying to understand this and to me it looks like this introduces potential race condition. c.Wait() releases mutex, then it starts to wait for notification. The thing is, in theory, when c.Wait() releases mutex, but before it adds itself to notification list, goroutine can lock the mutex, and run Broadcast(), after that c.Wait() can add itself to notification list and wait forever for broadcast. Of course in above example it's almost never gonna happen because of time.Sleep before broadcast which gives plenty of time for c.Wait to add itself to notification list before Broadcast. – Kamil Dziedzic Mar 12 '17 at 13:08
  • wow, nvm, this got fixed in go 1.7 I was looking at old code: github.com/golang/go/issues/14064 – Kamil Dziedzic Mar 12 '17 at 13:21
2

Here's a practical example with two go routines. They start one after another but the second one waits on a condition which is broadcast by the first one before proceeding:

package main

import (
    "sync"
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    lock := sync.Mutex{}
    lock.Lock()

    cond := sync.NewCond(&lock)

    waitGroup := sync.WaitGroup{}
    waitGroup.Add(2)

    go func() {
        defer waitGroup.Done()

        fmt.Println("First go routine has started and waits for 1 second before broadcasting condition")

        time.Sleep(1 * time.Second)

        fmt.Println("First go routine broadcasts condition")

        cond.Broadcast()
    }()

    go func() {
        defer waitGroup.Done()

        fmt.Println("Second go routine has started and is waiting on condition")

        cond.Wait()

        fmt.Println("Second go routine unlocked by condition broadcast")
    }()

    fmt.Println("Main go routine starts waiting")

    waitGroup.Wait()

    fmt.Println("Main go routine ends")
}

Output may vary slightly as the second go routine could start before the first one and viceversa:

Main go routine starts waiting
Second go routine has started and is waiting on condition
First go routine has started and waits for 1 second before broadcasting condition
First go routine broadcasts condition
Second go routine unlocked by condition broadcast
Main go routine ends

https://gist.github.com/fracasula/21565ea1cf0c15726ca38736031edc70

1

Looks like you c.Wait for Broadcast which would never happens with your time intervals. With

time.Sleep(3 * time.Second) //Broadcast after any Wait for it
c.Broadcast()

your snippet seems to work http://play.golang.org/p/OE8aP4i6gY .Or am I missing something that you try to achive?

1

I finally discovered a way to do this and it doesn't involve sync.Cond at all - just the mutex.

type Task struct {
    m       sync.Mutex
    headers http.Header
}

func NewTask() *Task {
    t := &Task{}
    t.m.Lock()
    go func() {
        defer t.m.Unlock()
        // ...do stuff...
    }()
    return t
}

func (t *Task) WaitFor() http.Header {
    t.m.Lock()
    defer t.m.Unlock()
    return t.headers
}

How does this work?

The mutex is locked at the beginning of the task, ensuring that anything calling WaitFor() will block. Once the headers are available and the mutex unlocked by the goroutine, each call to WaitFor() will execute one at a time. All future calls (even after the goroutine ends) will have no problem locking the mutex, since it will always be left unlocked.

  • For such purpose consider using sync.RWMutex instead. – Hermes Apr 18 at 14:51
0

Yes you can use one channel to pass Header to multiple Go routines.

headerChan := make(chan http.Header)

go func() { // This routine can be started many times
    header := <-headerChan  // Wait for header
    // Do things with the header
}()

// Feed the header to all waiting go routines
for more := true; more; {
    select {
    case headerChan <- r.Header:
    default: more = false
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.