3

What's the difference between %{$var} and %$var? I tried this code but there's error:

each on reference is experimental at test.pl line 21. Type of argument to each on reference must be unblessed hashref or arrayref at test.pl line 21.

use feature 'say';

%HoH = (
    1 => {
        husband   => "fred",
        pal       => "barney",
    },
    2 => {
        husband   => "george",
        wife      => "jane",
        "his boy" => "elroy",
    },
    3 => {
        husband   => "homer",
        wife      => "marge",
        kid       => "bart",
    },
);

for ($i = 1; $i <= 3; $i++) {
    while ( ($family, $roles) = each %$HoH{$i} ) {
        say "$family: $roles";
    }
}

But this code works fine:

use feature 'say';

%HoH = (
    1 => {
        husband   => "fred",
        pal       => "barney",
    },
    2 => {
        husband   => "george",
        wife      => "jane",
        "his boy" => "elroy",
    },
    3 => {
        husband   => "homer",
        wife      => "marge",
        kid       => "bart",
    },
);

for ($i = 1; $i <= 3; $i++) {
    while ( ($family, $roles) = each %{$HoH{$i}} ) {
        say "$family: $roles";
    }
}
7

With %$HoH{$i} you make a hash reference of $HoH, while with %{$HoH{$i}} you make a hash reference of $HoH{$i}, which is what you want... And, use strict on your code :-)

  • Yes I usually use strict in my code. It's just for testing purpose. :D. Thanks for your answer. :) – stenlytw Apr 26 '16 at 10:04
  • 2
    @bounces, even in testing you must use it! The error when using strict in your source is quite different: Global symbol "$HoH" requires explicit package name and that would have given you the answer to your question. – eballes Apr 26 '16 at 10:10
  • @eballes But there's still an error each on reference is experimental with use strict. – stenlytw Apr 26 '16 at 10:13
  • 1
    @bounces: keys on reference is expertimental before perl 1.14: if you can't upgrade, you can shut up that warning with the line no warnings 'experimental'; just before the each... – MarcoS Apr 26 '16 at 12:15
  • @MarcoS I'm using Perl 5.22. Btw did you mean before perl 5.14? – stenlytw Apr 26 '16 at 13:21
2

Its due to the different precedence levels of resolving the hash vs subscripting the hash. It works with the second version - %{ $HoH{$i} } - because you are unambiguously stating that the value returned by the lookup of $HoH{$i} is itself, a hashref.

Whereas %$HoH{$i} is interpreted as %{ $HoH }{$i} - ie. the subscripting is happening after the expression $HoH is interpreted as a hashref - which it isn't. %HoH is a hash but $HoH is not used - i.e. it's undefined.

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