129

How to get viewport's height???

window.innerHeight()

But using reactjs, I'm not sure how to get this information. My understanding is that

ReactDOM.findDomNode()

only works for components created. However this is not the case for the document or body element, which could give me height of the window.

215

This answer is similar to Jabran Saeed's, except it handles window resizing as well. I got it from here.

constructor(props) {
  super(props);
  this.state = { width: 0, height: 0 };
  this.updateWindowDimensions = this.updateWindowDimensions.bind(this);
}

componentDidMount() {
  this.updateWindowDimensions();
  window.addEventListener('resize', this.updateWindowDimensions);
}

componentWillUnmount() {
  window.removeEventListener('resize', this.updateWindowDimensions);
}

updateWindowDimensions() {
  this.setState({ width: window.innerWidth, height: window.innerHeight });
}
  • 3
    You can remove .bind(this) from the callback arguments since it's already bound by the constructor. – Scymex Apr 28 '17 at 12:28
  • 1
    Nitpick: code in constructor should probably be this.state = { width: 0, height: 0 }; so that state vars don't change their types (if I understand correctly window.innerWidth is integer). Doesn't change anything except makes code easier to understand IMHO. Thanks for the answer! – johndodo Jan 5 '18 at 7:01
  • 1
    @johndodo. Whoops. Edited. – speckledcarp Jan 5 '18 at 14:35
  • 7
    Why not this.state = { width: window.innerWidth, height: window.innerHeight }; to start? – Gerbus Jan 28 '18 at 17:57
  • 1
    Perhaps it's not the best idea to, use a callback to target the window's resize event and then re-target the global window object inside the callback. For performance, readability and convention sake, I am going to update it to use the given event values. – GoreDefex May 30 '18 at 1:16
96

Using Hooks (React 16.8.0+)

Create a useWindowDimensions hook.

import { useState, useEffect } from 'react';

function getWindowDimensions() {
  const { innerWidth: width, innerHeight: height } = window;
  return {
    width,
    height
  };
}

export default function useWindowDimensions() {
  const [windowDimensions, setWindowDimensions] = useState(getWindowDimensions());

  useEffect(() => {
    function handleResize() {
      setWindowDimensions(getWindowDimensions());
    }

    window.addEventListener('resize', handleResize);
    return () => window.removeEventListener('resize', handleResize);
  }, []);

  return windowDimensions;
}

And after that you'll be able to use it in your components like this

const Component = () => {
  const { height, width } = useWindowDimensions();

  return (
    <div>
      width: {width} ~ height: {height}
    </div>
  );
}

Working example

Original answer

It's the same in React, you can use window.innerHeight to get the current viewport's height.

As you can see here

  • 2
    window.innerHeight is not a function, it's a property – Jairo Sep 3 '18 at 8:38
  • 2
    looks like Kevin Danikowski edited the answer and somehow that change was approved. It's fixed now. – QoP Sep 3 '18 at 9:01
  • 3
    @FeCH it removes the event listener when the component is unmounted. It's called the cleanup function, you can read about it here – QoP Aug 16 '19 at 6:05
  • 1
    Any ideas to get the same approach with SSR (NextJS)? – roadev Sep 5 '19 at 19:48
  • 1
    @roadev at NextJS, you can also check if the req prop's available on getInitialProps. If it is, it's running on server, then you'll not have window variables. – giovannipds Dec 4 '19 at 21:28
51
class AppComponent extends React.Component {

  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {height: props.height};
  }

  componentWillMount(){
    this.setState({height: window.innerHeight + 'px'});
  }

  render() {
    // render your component...
  }
}

Set the props

AppComponent.propTypes = {
 height:React.PropTypes.string
};

AppComponent.defaultProps = {
 height:'500px'
};

viewport height is now available as {this.state.height} in rendering template

  • 12
    This solution doesn't update if the browser window is resized – speckledcarp Feb 9 '17 at 15:16
  • 1
    FYI, updating the state after a component mount will trigger a second render() call and can lead to property/layout thrashing. github.com/yannickcr/eslint-plugin-react/blob/master/docs/rules/… – Haukur Kristinsson Apr 15 '17 at 8:14
  • 1
    @HaukurKristinsson how to overcome this? – Richard Jun 7 '17 at 19:11
  • 1
    @JabranSaeed why not just go ahead and set the height on the constructor instead of updating it on mount? If you need to take props into consideration you can default the value to it like this: height: window.innerHeight || props.height. This will not only simplify the code but also removes unnecessary state changes. – JohnnyQ Jul 13 '17 at 5:31
  • componentWillMount is no longer recommended, see reactjs.org/docs/react-component.html#unsafe_componentwillmount – holmberd Apr 18 '19 at 18:28
13

@speckledcarp 's answer is great, but can be tedious if you need this logic in multiple components. You can refactor it as an HOC (higher order component) to make this logic easier to reuse.

withWindowDimensions.jsx

import React, { Component } from "react";

export default function withWindowDimensions(WrappedComponent) {
    return class extends Component {
        state = { width: 0, height: 0 };

        componentDidMount() {
            this.updateWindowDimensions();
            window.addEventListener("resize", this.updateWindowDimensions);
        }

        componentWillUnmount() {
            window.removeEventListener("resize", this.updateWindowDimensions);
        }

        updateWindowDimensions = () => {
            this.setState({ width: window.innerWidth, height: window.innerHeight });
        };

        render() {
            return (
                <WrappedComponent
                    {...this.props}
                    windowWidth={this.state.width}
                    windowHeight={this.state.height}
                    isMobileSized={this.state.width < 700}
                />
            );
        }
    };
}

Then in your main component:

import withWindowDimensions from './withWindowDimensions.jsx';

class MyComponent extends Component {
  render(){
    if(this.props.isMobileSized) return <p>It's short</p>;
    else return <p>It's not short</p>;
}

export default withWindowDimensions(MyComponent);

You can also "stack" HOCs if you have another you need to use, e.g. withRouter(withWindowDimensions(MyComponent))

Edit: I would go with a React hook nowadays (example above here), as they solve some of the advanced issues with HOCs and classes

8

I just spent some serious time figuring some things out with React and scrolling events / positions - so for those still looking, here's what I found:

The viewport height can be found by using window.innerHeight or by using document.documentElement.clientHeight. (Current viewport height)

The height of the entire document (body) can be found using window.document.body.offsetHeight.

If you're attempting to find the height of the document and know when you've hit the bottom - here's what I came up with:

if (window.pageYOffset >= this.myRefII.current.clientHeight && Math.round((document.documentElement.scrollTop + window.innerHeight)) < document.documentElement.scrollHeight - 72) {
        this.setState({
            trueOrNot: true
        });
      } else {
        this.setState({
            trueOrNot: false
        });
      }
    }

(My navbar was 72px in fixed position, thus the -72 to get a better scroll-event trigger)

Lastly, here are a number of scroll commands to console.log(), which helped me figure out my math actively.

console.log('window inner height: ', window.innerHeight);

console.log('document Element client hieght: ', document.documentElement.clientHeight);

console.log('document Element scroll hieght: ', document.documentElement.scrollHeight);

console.log('document Element offset height: ', document.documentElement.offsetHeight);

console.log('document element scrolltop: ', document.documentElement.scrollTop);

console.log('window page Y Offset: ', window.pageYOffset);

console.log('window document body offsetheight: ', window.document.body.offsetHeight);

Whew! Hope it helps someone!

4

I've just edited QoP's current answer to support SSR and use it with Next.js (React 16.8.0+):

/hooks/useWindowDimensions.js:

import { useState, useEffect } from 'react';

export default function useWindowDimensions() {

  const hasWindow = typeof window !== 'undefined';

  function getWindowDimensions() {
    const width = hasWindow ? window.innerWidth : null;
    const height = hasWindow ? window.innerHeight : null;
    return {
      width,
      height,
    };
  }

  const [windowDimensions, setWindowDimensions] = useState(getWindowDimensions());

  useEffect(() => {
    if (hasWindow) {
      function handleResize() {
        setWindowDimensions(getWindowDimensions());
      }

      window.addEventListener('resize', handleResize);
      return () => window.removeEventListener('resize', handleResize);
    }
  }, [hasWindow]);

  return windowDimensions;
}

/yourComponent.js:

import useWindowDimensions from './hooks/useWindowDimensions';

const Component = () => {
  const { height, width } = useWindowDimensions();
  /* you can also use default values or alias to use only one prop: */
  // const { height: windowHeight = 480 } useWindowDimensions();

  return (
    <div>
      width: {width} ~ height: {height}
    </div>
  );
}
2

Answers by @speckledcarp and @Jamesl are both brilliant. In my case, however, I needed a component whose height could extend the full window height, conditional at render time.... but calling a HOC within render() re-renders the entire subtree. BAAAD.

Plus, I wasn't interested in getting the values as props but simply wanted a parent div that would occupy the entire screen height (or width, or both).

So I wrote a Parent component providing a full height (and/or width) div. Boom.

A use case:

class MyPage extends React.Component {
  render() {
    const { data, ...rest } = this.props

    return data ? (
      // My app uses templates which misbehave badly if you manually mess around with the container height, so leave the height alone here.
      <div>Yay! render a page with some data. </div>
    ) : (
      <FullArea vertical>
        // You're now in a full height div, so containers will vertically justify properly
        <GridContainer justify="center" alignItems="center" style={{ height: "inherit" }}>
          <GridItem xs={12} sm={6}>
            Page loading!
          </GridItem>
        </GridContainer>
      </FullArea>
    )

Here's the component:

import React, { Component } from 'react'
import PropTypes from 'prop-types'

class FullArea extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.state = {
      width: 0,
      height: 0,
    }
    this.getStyles = this.getStyles.bind(this)
    this.updateWindowDimensions = this.updateWindowDimensions.bind(this)
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    this.updateWindowDimensions()
    window.addEventListener('resize', this.updateWindowDimensions)
  }

  componentWillUnmount() {
    window.removeEventListener('resize', this.updateWindowDimensions)
  }

  getStyles(vertical, horizontal) {
    const styles = {}
    if (vertical) {
      styles.height = `${this.state.height}px`
    }
    if (horizontal) {
      styles.width = `${this.state.width}px`
    }
    return styles
  }

  updateWindowDimensions() {
    this.setState({ width: window.innerWidth, height: window.innerHeight })
  }

  render() {
    const { vertical, horizontal } = this.props
    return (
      <div style={this.getStyles(vertical, horizontal)} >
        {this.props.children}
      </div>
    )
  }
}

FullArea.defaultProps = {
  horizontal: false,
  vertical: false,
}

FullArea.propTypes = {
  horizontal: PropTypes.bool,
  vertical: PropTypes.bool,
}

export default FullArea
0

You can also try this:

constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = {height: props.height, width:props.width};
      }

componentWillMount(){
          console.log("WINDOW : ",window);
          this.setState({height: window.innerHeight + 'px',width:window.innerWidth+'px'});
      }

render() {
        console.log("VIEW : ",this.state);
}

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