7
struct rgb_color {
    constexpr rgb_color(std::uint8_t nr, std::uint8_t ng, std::uint8_t nb) :
        r(nr), g(ng), b(nb) { }

    std::uint8_t r; // red
    std::uint8_t g; // green
    std::uint8_t b; // blue

    constexpr static rgb_color black = rgb_color(0, 0, 0);
    constexpr static rgb_color white = rgb_color(255, 255, 255);
};

The constexpr static constant definitions fail to compile:

constexpr variable cannot have non-literal type 'const rgb_color'

However according to http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/concept/LiteralType, const rgb_color should be a literal type, because it has only literal types as data members (std::uint8_t), and the constexpr constructor.

Why does the code not compile?

Also, is it necessary to define the constexpr static members in a .cc file, like

constexpr rgb_color rgb_color::black;
  • Does it work if you do constexpr static rgb_color black(0, 0, 0); ? – Sean Apr 26 '16 at 11:24
  • The link you give has a suggestion: "possibly cv-qualified (C++17)". Your compiler may be playing by the C++14 rules here. – MSalters Apr 26 '16 at 11:29
16

This doesn't work, because you are instantiating a type that is not fully declared yet (you have not reached the closing brace and semicolon yet, so rgb_color is still an incomplete type).

You can work around this by declaring your constants out of the class, maybe in their own namespace:

namespace rgb_color_constants {
    constexpr static rgb_color black = rgb_color(0, 0, 0);
    constexpr static rgb_color white = rgb_color(255, 255, 255);
}
3

You should be able to make black and white into static constexpr functions--i.e. this is an example of the "named-constructor idiom."

struct rgb_color {
    constexpr rgb_color(std::uint8_t nr, std::uint8_t ng, std::uint8_t nb) :
    r(nr), g(ng), b(nb) { }

    std::uint8_t r; // red
    std::uint8_t g; // green
    std::uint8_t b; // blue

    constexpr static rgb_color black() { return rgb_color(0, 0, 0); }
    constexpr static rgb_color white() { return rgb_color(255, 255, 255); }
};
2

Why not this?

struct rgb_color {
    constexpr rgb_color(std::uint8_t nr, std::uint8_t ng, std::uint8_t nb) :
        r(nr), g(ng), b(nb) { }

    std::uint8_t r; // red
    std::uint8_t g; // green
    std::uint8_t b; // blue

    static const rgb_color black;
    static const rgb_color white;
};

const rgb_color rgb_color::black {0, 0, 0};
const rgb_color rgb_color::white {255, 255, 255};
  • 1
    const is not constexpr – chi Apr 26 '16 at 13:47
  • @chi True. What's the benefit of constexpr in this case? – ZDF Apr 26 '16 at 13:49
  • That it won't work in expressions that require a constant expression. constexpr auto dummy = rgb_color::black{}, for example. – edmz Apr 26 '16 at 14:16
  • @black Yes, it won't work. But, maybe constexpr it is not need it (hence "Why not this?"). Now, that I see the accepted answer, I realize that it is a must. – ZDF Apr 26 '16 at 15:10

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