Let's say I have an interface:

interface IUser {
  email: string;
  id: number;
  phone: string;
};

Then I have a function that expects a subset (or complete match) of that type. Maybe it will pass an entire object, made it will just pass in {email: "t@g.com"}. I want the type checker to allow for both.

Example:

function updateUser(user: IUser) {
  // Update a "subset" of user attributes:
  $http.put("/users/update", user);
}

Does Typescript support this sort of behavior yet? I could find it very useful, particularly with paradigms like Redux.

To clarify, the goal is:

  1. Avoid re-writing an interface and manually setting all attributes to optional.
  2. Avoid assignment of unexpected attributes (such as spelling mistakes).
  3. Avoid imperative logic such as if statements, which forfeit benefits of compile time type checking.

UPDATE: Typescript has announced support for mapped types which should solve this problem once published.

  • isn't Partial what you're looking for? – Nishchal Gautam Jun 23 '17 at 6:52
  • They did not exist when I asked the question. I added a link later, after they were added to TS. – Rick Jun 23 '17 at 14:45
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Typescript now supports partial types.

The correct way to create a partial type is:

type PartialUser = Partial<IUser>;

You can declare some or all fields as optional fields.

interface IUser {
  email: string; // not optional
  id?: number; // optional 
  phone?: string; // optional
};
  • This is close, but not quite what I want. In the case of IUser, all fields are mandatory. It's just under certain circumstances that I would want it to be a partial match. – Rick Apr 26 '16 at 17:01
  • the requirements are contradictory, you can't have a field be optional and mandatory at the same time. :P I guess you could use 2 interfaces to get that though.. – toskv Apr 26 '16 at 17:02
  • 1
    There are many times when you would want this and other languages (like Flow) allow for it. It is for the sake of DRYness that you would want to allow a subset under certain circumstances. Consider Backbone model updates, where you have named parameters that must be a subset of the model's attributes. – Rick Apr 26 '16 at 17:06
  • 1
    I agree with @toskv. If under certain situations those fields may be absent, then those are not mandatory. You can define different interfaces for those different scenarios. In any case I'm not sure why someone downvoted his answer, it is correct. – Nitzan Tomer Apr 26 '16 at 17:14

You can seperate it into different interfaces:

interface IUser {
    id: number;
};

interface IUserEmail extends IUser {
    email: string;
}

interface IUserPhone extends IUser {
    phone: string;
}

Have your method receive the base IUser interface and then check for the fields you need:

function doit(user: IUser) {
    if (user.email) {

    } else if (user.phone) {

    }
}

If I understand this question correctly, you want something like Flow's $Shape

So, in one place, you may have something that requires the type

interface IUser {
  email: string;
  id: number;
  phone: string;
};

Then, in another place you want a the type with the same type as IUser just with all the fields now optional.

interface IUserOptional {
  email?: string;
  id?: number;
  phone?: string;
};

You want a way to auto-generate IUserOptional based on IUser without having to write out the types again.

Now, I don't think this is possible in Typescript. Things may change in 2.0, but I don't think we're even close to something like this in Typescript yet.

You could look at a pre-compiler which would generate such code for you before typescript runs, but that doesn't sound like a trivial thing to do.

With this problem in mind, I can only suggest you try Flow instead. In flow you can just do $Shape<IUser> to generate the type you want programmatically. Of course, Flow differs from Typescript in many big and small ways, so keep that in mind. Flow is not a compiler, so you won't get things like Enums and class implementing interfactes

proper solution with mapped types:

updateUser<K extends keyof IUser>(userData: {[P in K]: IUser[P]}) {
    ...
}

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