558

Ok,

I know all about array_pop(), but that deletes the last element. How to get the last element of an array without deleting it?

Here's a bonus:

$array = array('a' => 'a', 'b' => 'b', 'c' => 'c');

or even

$array = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
unset($array[2]);
echo $array[sizeof($array) - 1]; // Output: PHP Notice:  Undefined offset:  2 in - on line 4
3
  • 14
    Believe it or not popping it and putting it back on is one of the fastest ways I benchmarked doing this. $val=$array[]=array_pop($array); echo $val; Commented Jun 27, 2016 at 16:36
  • 2
    This question resulted in many options. To help myself choose, I did some comparison of most notable / distinct options and shared the results as a separate answer. (:@user2782001 suggested my favorite so far in the comment above.:) Thanks to all for contributing!
    – pjvleeuwen
    Commented Feb 5, 2017 at 18:33
  • 2
    @TheodoreRSmith When PHP 7.3 is released you could consider making (this suggestion by Quasimodo's clone the 'accepted answer' (for your consideration)...
    – pjvleeuwen
    Commented Oct 4, 2018 at 11:55

33 Answers 33

618
Answer recommended by PHP Collective

Try end:

$myLastElement = end($yourArray);

Note that this doesn't just return the last element of the passed array, it also modifies the array's internal pointer, which is used by current, each, prev, and next.

For PHP >= 7.3.0:

If you are using PHP version 7.3.0 or later, you can use array_key_last, which returns the last key of the array without modifying its internal pointer. So to get the last value, you can do:

$myLastElement = $yourArray[array_key_last($yourArray)];
18
  • 10
    @DavidMurdoch Perhaps, but it sure does churn the RAM and CPU, creating the temp array for the array values... Commented May 5, 2012 at 2:46
  • 14
    If your server is consuming too much RAM so that calling one simple extra function is a deal breaker, I suggest you re-examine your server's configuration and resources. Commented Jul 2, 2012 at 19:16
  • 7
    end(array_values()) will give a E_STRICT: "Only variables should be passed by reference"
    – kolypto
    Commented Nov 29, 2012 at 0:57
  • 39
    Add additional parenthesis to avoid the strict warning: end((array_values($yourArray)))
    – Daniel W.
    Commented Mar 19, 2014 at 14:04
  • 3
    For those who go right to the answers and usually don't read the whole question... Do yourself a favor and read the whole question... OP knows about the function to use array_pop() "I know all about array_pop()" But if you don't read until the end of the question, you might think that what is being discussed here is just the way to get the last element of an array regardless of deletion. Hope it can help some other going above the speed limit.
    – mimoralea
    Commented Sep 3, 2014 at 17:37
353

The many answers in this thread present us with many different options. To be able to choose from them I needed to understand their behavior and performance. In this answer I will share my findings with you, benchmarked against PHP versions 5.6.38, 7.2.10 and 7.3.0RC1 (expected Dec 13 2018).

The options (<<option code>>s) I will test are:

(functions mentioned: array_key_last , array_keys , array_pop , array_slice , array_values , count , end , reset)

The test inputs (<<input code>>s) to combine with:

  • null = $array = null;
  • empty = $array = [];
  • last_null = $array = ["a","b","c",null];
  • auto_idx = $array = ["a","b","c","d"];
  • shuffle = $array = []; $array[1] = "a"; $array[2] = "b"; $array[0] = "c";
  • 100 = $array = []; for($i=0;$i<100;$i++) { $array[] = $i; }
  • 100000 = $array = []; for($i=0;$i<100000;$i++) { $array[] = $i; }

For testing I will use the 5.6.38, 7.2.10 and 7.3.0RC1 PHP docker containers like:

sudo docker run -it --rm php:5.6.38-cli-stretch php -r '<<<CODE HERE>>>'

Each combination of the above listed <<option code>>s and <<input code>>s will be run on all versions of PHP. For each test run the following code snippet is used:

<<input code>>  error_reporting(E_ALL);  <<option code>>  error_reporting(0); $before=microtime(TRUE); for($i=0;$i<100;$i++){echo ".";for($j=0;$j<100;$j++){  <<option code>>  }}; $after=microtime(TRUE); echo "\n"; var_dump($x); echo round(($after-$before)/(100*100)*1000*1000*1000);

For each run this will var_dump the last retrieved last value of the test input and print the average duration of one iteration in femtoseconds (0.000000000000001th of a second).

The results are as follows:

/==========================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================\
||                                                                      ||                            T  E  S  T     I  N  P  U  T     -     5  .  6  .  3  8                            ||                             T  E  S  T     I  N  P  U  T     -     7  .  2  .  1  0                           ||                             T  E  S  T     I  N  P  U  T     -     7  .  3  .  0  R  C  1                     ||
||                                                                      ||          null |         empty |     last_null |      auto_idx |       shuffle |           100 |        100000 ||          null |         empty |     last_null |      auto_idx |       shuffle |           100 |        100000 ||          null |         empty |     last_null |      auto_idx |       shuffle |           100 |        100000 ||
||============================OPTIONS - ERRORS==========================++===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============++===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============++===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============<|
||  1.  $x = array_values(array_slice($array, -1))[0];                  ||       W1 + W2 |            N1 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||       W1 + W2 |            N1 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||       W1 + W2 |            N1 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||
||  2.  $x = array_slice($array, -1)[0];                                ||            W1 |            N1 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||            W1 |            N1 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||            W1 |            N1 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||
||  3.  $x = array_pop((array_slice($array, -1)));                      ||       W1 + W3 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||  W1 + N2 + W3 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 ||  W1 + N2 + W3 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 ||
||  4.  $x = array_pop((array_slice($array, -1, 1)));                   ||       W1 + W3 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||  W1 + N2 + W3 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 ||  W1 + N2 + W3 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 ||
||  5.  $x = end($array); reset($array);                                ||       W4 + W5 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||       W4 + W5 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 ||       W4 + W5 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||
||  6.  $x = end((array_values($array)));                               ||       W2 + W4 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||  W2 + N2 + W4 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||  W2 + N2 + W4 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 |            N2 ||
||  7.  $x = $array[count($array)-1];                                   ||             - |            N3 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||            W7 |            N3 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||            W7 |            N3 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||
||  8.  $keys = array_keys($array); $x = $array[$keys[count($keys)-1]]; ||            W6 |       N3 + N4 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||       W6 + W7 |       N3 + N4 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||       W6 + W7 |       N3 + N4 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||
||  9.  $x = $array[] = array_pop($array);                              ||            W3 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||            W3 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||            W3 |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - |             - ||
|| 10.  $x = $array[array_key_last($array)];                            ||            F1 |            F1 |            F1 |            F1 |            F1 |            F1 |            F1 ||            F2 |            F2 |            F2 |            F2 |            F2 |            F2 |            F2 ||            W8 |            N4 |            F2 |            F2 |            F2 |            F2 |            F2 ||
||========================OPTIONS - VALUE RETRIEVED=====================++===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============++===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============++===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============<|
||  1.  $x = array_values(array_slice($array, -1))[0];                  ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||
||  2.  $x = array_slice($array, -1)[0];                                ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||
||  3.  $x = array_pop((array_slice($array, -1)));                      ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||
||  4.  $x = array_pop((array_slice($array, -1, 1)));                   ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||
||  5.  $x = end($array); reset($array);                                ||          NULL |   bool(false) |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |   bool(false) |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |   bool(false) |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||
||  6.  $x = end((array_values($array)));                               ||          NULL |   bool(false) |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |   bool(false) |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |   bool(false) |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||
||  7.  $x = $array[count($array)-1];                                   ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "b" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "b" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "b" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||
||  8.  $keys = array_keys($array); $x = $array[$keys[count($keys)-1]]; ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||
||  9.  $x = $array[] = array_pop($array);                              ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||          NULL |          NULL |          NULL | string(1) "d" | string(1) "c" |       int(99) |    int(99999) ||
|| 10.  $x = $array[array_key_last($array)];                            ||           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A ||           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A ||           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A ||
||=================OPTIONS - FEMTOSECONDS PER ITERATION=================++===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============++===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============++===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============+===============<|
||  1.  $x = array_values(array_slice($array, -1))[0];                  ||           803 |           466 |           390 |           384 |           373 |           764 |     1.046.642 ||           691 |           252 |           101 |           128 |            93 |           170 |        89.028 ||           695 |           235 |            90 |            97 |            95 |           188 |        87.991 ||
||  2.  $x = array_slice($array, -1)[0];                                ||           414 |           349 |           252 |           248 |           246 |           604 |     1.038.074 ||           373 |           249 |            85 |            91 |            90 |           164 |        90.750 ||           367 |           224 |            78 |            85 |            80 |           155 |        86.141 ||
||  3.  $x = array_pop((array_slice($array, -1)));                      ||           724 |           228 |           323 |           318 |           350 |           673 |     1.042.263 ||           988 |           285 |           309 |           317 |           331 |           401 |        88.363 ||           877 |           266 |           298 |           300 |           326 |           403 |        87.279 ||
||  4.  $x = array_pop((array_slice($array, -1, 1)));                   ||           734 |           266 |           358 |           356 |           349 |           699 |     1.050.101 ||           887 |           288 |           316 |           322 |           314 |           408 |        88.402 ||           935 |           268 |           335 |           315 |           313 |           403 |        86.445 ||
||  5.  $x = end($array); reset($array);                                ||           715 |           186 |           185 |           180 |           176 |           185 |           172 ||           674 |            73 |            69 |            70 |            66 |            65 |            70 ||           693 |            65 |            85 |            74 |            68 |            70 |            69 ||
||  6.  $x = end((array_values($array)));                               ||           877 |           205 |           320 |           337 |           304 |         2.901 |     7.921.860 ||           948 |           300 |           336 |           308 |           309 |           509 |    29.696.951 ||           946 |           262 |           301 |           309 |           302 |           499 |    29.234.928 ||
||  7.  $x = $array[count($array)-1];                                   ||           123 |           300 |           137 |           139 |           143 |           140 |           144 ||           312 |           218 |            48 |            53 |            45 |            47 |            51 ||           296 |           217 |            46 |            44 |            53 |            53 |            55 ||
||  8.  $keys = array_keys($array); $x = $array[$keys[count($keys)-1]]; ||           494 |           593 |           418 |           435 |           399 |         3.873 |    12.199.450 ||           665 |           407 |           103 |           109 |           114 |           431 |    30.053.730 ||           647 |           445 |            91 |            95 |            96 |           419 |    30.718.586 ||
||  9.  $x = $array[] = array_pop($array);                              ||           186 |           178 |           175 |           188 |           180 |           181 |           186 ||            83 |            78 |            75 |            71 |            74 |            69 |            83 ||            71 |            64 |            70 |            64 |            68 |            69 |            81 ||
|| 10.  $x = $array[array_key_last($array)];                            ||           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A ||           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A |           N/A ||           370 |           223 |            49 |            52 |            61 |            57 |            52 ||
 \=========================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================/ 

The above mentioned Fatal, Warning and Notice codes translate as:

F1 = Fatal error: Call to undefined function array_key_last() in Command line code on line 1
F2 = Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Call to undefined function array_key_last() in Command line code:1
W1 = Warning: array_slice() expects parameter 1 to be array, null given in Command line code on line 1
W2 = Warning: array_values() expects parameter 1 to be array, null given in Command line code on line 1
W3 = Warning: array_pop() expects parameter 1 to be array, null given in Command line code on line 1
W4 = Warning: end() expects parameter 1 to be array, null given in Command line code on line 1
W5 = Warning: reset() expects parameter 1 to be array, null given in Command line code on line 1
W6 = Warning: array_keys() expects parameter 1 to be array, null given in Command line code on line 1
W7 = Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in Command line code on line 1
W8 = Warning: array_key_last() expects parameter 1 to be array, null given in Command line code on line 1
N1 = Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in Command line code on line 1
N2 = Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in Command line code on line 1
N3 = Notice: Undefined offset: -1 in Command line code on line 1
N4 = Notice: Undefined index:  in Command line code on line 1

Based on this output I draw the following conclusions:

  • newer versions of PHP perform better with the exception of these options that became significantly slower:
    • option .6. $x = end((array_values($array)));
    • option .8. $keys = array_keys($array); $x = $array[$keys[count($keys)-1]];
  • these options scale best for very large arrays:
    • option .5. $x = end($array); reset($array);
    • option .7. $x = $array[count($array)-1];
    • option .9. $x = $array[] = array_pop($array);
    • option 10. $x = $array[array_key_last($array)]; (since PHP 7.3)
  • these options should only be used for auto-indexed arrays:
    • option .7. $x = $array[count($array)-1]; (due to use of count)
    • option .9. $x = $array[] = array_pop($array); (due to assigning value losing original key)
  • this option does not preserve the array's internal pointer
    • option .5. $x = end($array); reset($array);
  • this option is an attempt to modify option .5. to preserve the array's internal pointer (but sadly it does not scale well for very large arrays)
    • option .6. $x = end((array_values($array)));
  • the new array_key_last function seems to have none of the above mentioned limitations with the exception of still being an RC at the time of this writing (so use the RC or await it's release Dec 2018):
    • option 10. $x = $array[array_key_last($array)]; (since PHP 7.3)

A bit depending on whether using the array as stack or as queue you can make variations on option 9.

15
  • If you find a particular option to be missing you can test it yourself by copy-pasting the above code snippets together, comparing it against a previously tested option. To add an option to this list would be retesting all combinations for comparable performance results. If you have a particular option that you think should be added, please drop a comment, I intent to add it then (though it may take some time).
    – pjvleeuwen
    Commented Feb 4, 2017 at 13:04
  • 1
    Very great answer, one comment though: for associative arrays option 9 cannot be used too, because we are assigning back to an auto-indexed key instead of the previous key name. Commented Jul 26, 2017 at 5:52
  • 4
    Nice summary! Please add my answer using the new PHP 7.3. function $array[array_key_last($array)]; to your benchmark. And please give me some notification when done. I'ld like to see the performance results in comparison. Commented Sep 26, 2018 at 3:55
  • 2
    @sz it was mainly produced with a lot of stubbornness and patience but the general selection and multi-line edit functions of Sublime text editor helped. regenerating it took almost a day, so if I need to do it again I will probably write something that converts the output of all 210 docker executions to a table automatically :-)
    – pjvleeuwen
    Commented Sep 29, 2018 at 20:07
  • 1
    @quasimodos-clone I regenerated the whole table based on latest released PHP 5, 7 and your RC. I suppose we will want to generate it again coming December when it is actually released. Thanks for bringing this new function to everybody's attention.
    – pjvleeuwen
    Commented Sep 29, 2018 at 20:08
218

Short and sweet.

I came up with solution to remove error message and preserve one-liner form and efficient performance:

$lastEl = array_values(array_slice($array, -1))[0];

-- previous solution

$lastEl = array_pop((array_slice($array, -1)));

Note: The extra parentheses are needed to avoid a PHP Strict standards: Only variables should be passed by reference.

8
  • 1
    Greet answer, but adding the extra parentheses feels a little hackisch. Also phpStorm will mark this as an error. Extra info for adding extra parentheses (phpsadness.com/sad/51). To overcome the error, you could make this a '2-liner': $array = array_slice($array, -1); $lastEl = array_pop($array); Personally i think this is better (without the parser 'bug')
    – Maurice
    Commented Jun 23, 2016 at 9:38
  • You can stil get it as one-liner and without additional variable: $lastEl = array_pop($lastEl = (array_slice($array, -1)));
    – rolacja
    Commented Jun 23, 2016 at 15:56
  • 3
    You can use dereferencing like this: array_slice($array, -1)[0]
    – Vikash
    Commented Oct 4, 2016 at 12:24
  • 1
    You can't if you have strings as index in array
    – rolacja
    Commented Oct 8, 2016 at 6:45
  • 3
    This answer still needs at least two checks to avoid PHP notices. 1. check if the array_size() > 1 2. Check if the array is actually an array. I still stick to the answer by @Iznogood as PHP's in-built end() function already does all the hard-work in a more efficient manner.
    – Ema4rl
    Commented Dec 4, 2016 at 23:43
46

What's wrong with array_slice($array, -1)? (See Manual: https://www.php.net/array_slice)

array_slice() returns an array. Probably not what you are looking for. You want the element.

4
  • 31
    Use array_slice($array, -1)[0] to get the element.
    – Pang
    Commented Oct 19, 2015 at 4:28
  • 3
    This is the answer. "end" Changing the internal pointer of the array? Asking for trouble, and very hard to read! Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 15:03
  • Love this approach, although as @Pang points out, it's not quite complete. reset(array_slice($array, -1)) is another approach (that won't cause an error if array_slice() returns anything "smaller" than a single-element array)
    – rinogo
    Commented Feb 9, 2016 at 16:56
  • The best approach as you can directly modify the element: array_slice($array, -1)[0] = ""; Commented Nov 16, 2016 at 10:14
22

If you don't care about modifying the internal pointer (the following lines support both indexed and associative arrays):

// false if empty array
$last = end($array);

// null if empty array
$last = !empty($array) ? end($array) : null;


If you want an utility function that doesn't modify the internal pointer (because the array is passed by value to the function, so the function operates on a copy of it):

function array_last($array) {
    if (empty($array)) {
        return null;
    }
    return end($array);
}


Though, PHP produces copies "on-the-fly", i.e. only when actually needed. As the end() function modifies the array, internally a copy of the whole array (minus one item) is generated.


Therefore, I would recommend the following alternative that is actually faster, as internally it doesn't copy the array, it just makes a slice:

function array_last($array) {
    if (empty($array)) {
        return null;
    }
    foreach (array_slice($array, -1) as $value) {
        return $value;
    }
}

Additionally, the "foreach / return" is a tweak for efficiently getting the first (and here single) item.


Finally, the fastest alternative but for indexed arrays (and without gaps) only:

$last = !empty($array) ? $array[count($array)-1] : null;


For the record, here is another answer of mine, for the array's first element.

2
  • you provide 2 alternative implementations for an array_last function. For the first you state that the $array is copied and for the second that it is not copied. Where is the difference / why is it copied in the first implementation and not in the second?
    – pjvleeuwen
    Commented Oct 4, 2018 at 11:44
  • 1
    @PaulvanLeeuwen I understood why you got confused. I tried to clarify the answer, is it better? Commented Oct 5, 2018 at 20:27
21

One way to avoid pass-by-reference errors (eg. "end(array_values($foo))") is to use call_user_func or call_user_func_array:

// PHP Fatal error: Only variables can be passed by reference
// No output (500 server error)
var_dump(end(array(1, 2, 3)));

// No errors, but modifies the array's internal pointer
// Outputs "int(3)"
var_dump(call_user_func('end', array(1, 2, 3)));

// PHP Strict standards:  Only variables should be passed by reference
// Outputs "int(3)"
var_dump(end(array_values(array(1, 2, 3))));

// No errors, doesn't change the array
// Outputs "int(3)"
var_dump(call_user_func('end', array_values(array(1, 2, 3))));
4
  • Great approach! (insert the standard 'This should be the accepted answer' here)
    – Typo
    Commented Oct 17, 2013 at 8:54
  • 3
    Or just add an extra paranthesis. Shorter and sweeter: end((array_values($yourArray)))
    – Dzhuneyt
    Commented Sep 2, 2014 at 14:40
  • 6
    The extra parenthesis trick relies on a bug in PHP, and that approach no longer works in later versions of PHP (or at least, not in PHP 7). Commented May 6, 2016 at 19:29
  • 1
    And the call_user_func trick doesn't work in PHP 7 either. I think you're stuck with creating a temporary variable. Commented May 6, 2016 at 19:34
14

As of PHP version 7.3 the functions array_key_first and array_key_last has been introduced.

Since arrays in PHP are not strict array types, i.e. fixed sized collections of fixed sized fields starting at index 0, but dynamically extended associative array, the handling of positions with unknown keys is hard and workarounds do not perform very well. In contrast real arrays would be internally addressed via pointer arithmethics very rapidly and the last index is already known at compile-time by declaration.

At least the problem with the first and last position is solved by builtin functions now since version 7.3. This even works without any warnings on array literals out of the box:

$first = array_key_first([1, 2, 'A' => 65, 'B' => 66, 3, 4]);
$last  = array_key_last ([1, 2, 'A' => 65, 'B' => 66, 3, 4]);

Obviously the last value is:

$array[array_key_last($array)];
3
  • 2
    Thanks for bringing this to everybody's attention. For those who are eager to use this: please not that this is a RC at the moment of this writing. It is scheduled for release Dec 2018.
    – pjvleeuwen
    Commented Sep 30, 2018 at 19:23
  • 1
    This is great news. I've just posted a polyfill/shim in my answer below so people can start using this syntax right away. Commented Oct 5, 2018 at 21:10
  • This deserves more upvotes since it was posted first. This array_key_last solution was also added in May 2022 to the top-voted answer by someone else. IMO without a nod to this is unfair even though this answer itself is years old and kind of at the bottom now.
    – joeljpa
    Commented Aug 25, 2023 at 11:11
12

I need this quite often to deal with stacks, and i always find myself baffled that there's no native function that does it without manipulating the array or its internal pointer in some form.

So i usually carry around a util function that's also safe to use on associative arrays.

function array_last($array) {
    if (count($array) < 1)
        return null;

    $keys = array_keys($array);
    return $array[$keys[sizeof($keys) - 1]];
}
1
  • 1
    Good news, they are making it a native function :-) You can keep an eye on it's release planning here: wiki.php.net/todo/php73 (expected Dec 13 2018 at the time of this writing).
    – pjvleeuwen
    Commented Oct 4, 2018 at 11:40
11

untested: wouldn't this work?

<?php
$last_element=end(array_values($array));
?>

Since the array returned by array_values is fleeting, no-one cares if it's pointer is reset.

and if you need the key to go with it I guess you'd do:

<?php
$last_key=end(array_keys($array));
?>
1
  • 2
    Question: why untested? You just open a terminal and type: php -r '$array=[1,2,3];echo end(array_values($array))."\n";' BTW it throws a notice, so it's not the best way: Only variables should be passed by reference in Command line code on line 1
    – soger
    Commented Oct 26, 2020 at 12:44
11

To get the last element of an array, use:

$lastElement = array_slice($array, -1)[0];

Benchmark

I iterated 1,000 times, grabbing the last element of small and large arrays that contained 100 and 50,000 elements, respectively.

Method: $array[count($array)-1];
Small array (s): 0.000319957733154
Large array (s): 0.000526905059814
Note: Fastest!  count() must access an internal length property.
Note: This method only works if the array is naturally-keyed (0, 1, 2, ...).

Method: array_slice($array, -1)[0];
Small array (s): 0.00145292282104
Large array (s): 0.499367952347

Method: array_pop((array_slice($array, -1, 1)));
Small array (s): 0.00162816047668
Large array (s): 0.513121843338

Method: end($array);
Small array (s): 0.0028350353241
Large array (s): 4.81077480316
Note: Slowest...

I used PHP Version 5.5.32.

7
  • what about using $array[array_keys($array)[count(array_keys($array))-1] ]? Commented Jun 27, 2016 at 15:59
  • hmm..array_keys seems to scale pretty poorly. Commented Jun 27, 2016 at 16:08
  • 1
    It's actually crazy faster for the large array (0.0002) to pop the item and put it back on...$val=$ar[]=$array_pop($ar); Commented Jun 27, 2016 at 16:31
  • 1
    @Westy92 Your units seem wrong on the benchmark. The smallest number you give is 0.00031... microseconds which is about 0.3 nanoseconds. That would mean that your test took one clock tick to run if you have a newish computer. I'm guessing you either meant milliseconds or possibly even seconds.
    – cesoid
    Commented Jul 18, 2016 at 20:12
  • 1
    The values are clearly several orders of magnitude wrong. Why the focus on performance anyway?
    – istepaniuk
    Commented May 16, 2018 at 8:29
6

end() will provide the last element of an array

$array = array('a' => 'a', 'b' => 'b', 'c' => 'c');
echo end($array); //output: c

$array1 = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
echo end($array1); //output: d
1
  • 1
    This solution works, but it changes the array's internal pointer, I don't think it is the right way.
    – UnixAgain
    Commented Dec 21, 2016 at 3:48
5

One more possible solution...

$last_element = array_reverse( $array )[0];
1
  • Not working on associative arrays does not seem like enough reason to downvote to me. Quality-wise this answer is not worse then many other answers to this question. I do not understand why I see at least 2 downvotes at this time. (score of -2). Anyways, upvote for me, it is not that bad.
    – pjvleeuwen
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 20:57
5

How about this?

Eg-

$arr = [1,2,3];
$lastElem = count($arr) ? $arr[count($arr) - 1] : null;
0
4
$lastValue = end(array_values($array))

No modification is made to $array pointers. This avoids the

reset($array)

which might not be desired in certain conditions.

4

For me:

$last = $array[count($array) - 1];

With associatives:

$last =array_values($array)[count($array - 1)]
2
  • Please provide some context to your answer.
    – Shawn
    Commented Nov 15, 2016 at 19:54
  • 2
    @Shawn Which context? Don't need context. Added code for associative arrays. Commented Nov 15, 2016 at 20:30
4

How about:

current(array_slice($array, -1))
  • works for associative arrays
  • works when $array == [] (returns false)
  • doesn't affect the original array
1
  • I like this, because you don't have to pass by reference. So it can be used for the oft-asked question "How do I get the last element of a delimited string?", by using current(array_slice(explode('|', 'a|b|c|d'), -1)) Commented Sep 22, 2021 at 0:13
3

The top answers are great, but as mentioned by @paul-van-leeuwen and @quasimodos-clone, PHP 7.3 will introduce two new functions to solve this problem directly - array_key_first() and array_key_last().

You can start using this syntax today with the following polyfill (or shim) functions.

// Polyfill for array_key_last() available from PHP 7.3
if (!function_exists('array_key_last')) {
  function array_key_last($array) {
    return array_slice(array_keys($array),-1)[0];
  }
}

// Polyfill for array_key_first() available from PHP 7.3
if (!function_exists('array_key_first')) {
  function array_key_first($array) {
    return array_slice(array_keys($array),0)[0];
  }
}

// Usage examples:
$first_element_key   = array_key_first($array);
$first_element_value = $array[array_key_first($array)];

$last_element_key    = array_key_last($array);
$last_element_value  = $array[array_key_last($array)];

Caveat: This requires PHP 5.4 or greater.

2

To do this and avoid the E_STRICT and not mess with the array's internal pointer you can use:

function lelement($array) {return end($array);}

$last_element = lelement($array);

lelement only works with a copy so it doesn't affect the array's pointer.

2

For getting the last value from Array :

array_slice($arr,-1,1) ;

For Removing last value form array :

array_slice($arr,0,count($arr)-1) ;
2
  • 1
    array_slice($arr,-1,1) will result in another array with length 1, not the last element
    – Vic
    Commented Jan 19, 2016 at 8:01
  • Let's take a example : $a=array("red","green","blue","yellow","brown"); print_r(array_slice($a,-1,1)); Result: Array ( [0] => brown )
    – Rishabh
    Commented Jan 19, 2016 at 14:39
2

Another solution:

$array = array('a' => 'a', 'b' => 'b', 'c' => 'c');
$lastItem = $array[(array_keys($array)[(count($array)-1)])];
echo $lastItem;
2

As of PHP 7.3, array_key_last is available

$lastEl = $myArray[array_key_last($myArray)];
0
2

You will get last element from an array easily by using below logic

$array = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
echo ($array[count($array)-1]);

Not only last element but you can also get second last, third last and so on by using below logic.

for second last element you have to pass just number 2 in the above statement for example:
echo ($array[count($array)-2]);

1

Simply: $last_element = end((array_values($array)))

Doesn't reset the array and doesn't gives STRICT warnings.

PS. Since the most voted answer still hasn't the double parenthesis, I submitted this answer.

1

I think this is a slight improvement on all the existing answers:

$lastElement = count($array) > 0 ? array_values(array_slice($array, -1))[0] : null;
  • Performs better than end() or solutions using array_keys(), especially with large arrays
  • Won't modify the array's internal pointer
  • Won't try to access an undefined offset for empty arrays
  • Will work as expected for empty arrays, indexed arrays, mixed arrays, and associative arrays
2
  • Sadly it doesn't work with associative arrays, because the slice's single item may have a named key. Commented Jul 26, 2017 at 17:43
  • You're right, edited to add a fix (array_values on the single-element slice)
    – Adelmar
    Commented Jul 26, 2017 at 18:05
1

Nowadays, I'd prefer always having this helper, as suggested at an php.net/end answer.

<?php
function endc($array) {
    return end($array);
}

$items = array('one','two','three');
$lastItem = endc($items); // three
$current = current($items); // one
?>

This will always keeps the pointer as it is and we will never have to worry about parenthesis, strict standards or whatever.

1
1

Most solutions here are unreliable for unassociated arrays, because if we have an unassociated array with the last element being false, then end and current(array_slice($array, -1)) will also return false so we can't use false as an indicator of an empty unassociated array.

// end returns false form empty arrays
>>> $arr = []
>>> end($arr)
=> false

// last element is false, so end returns false,
// now we'll have a false possitive that the array is empty
>>> $arr = [1, 2, 3, false]
>>> end($arr)
=> false

>>> $arr = [1, 2, 3, false, 4]
>>> end($arr)
=> 4

Same goes for current(array_slice($arr, -1)):

// returns false form empty arrays
>>> $arr = []
>>> current(array_slice($arr, -1))
=> false

// returns false if last element is false
>>> $arr = [1, 2, 3, false]
>>> current(array_slice($arr, -1))
=> false

>>> $arr = [1, 2, 3, false, 4]
>>> current(array_slice($arr, -1))
=> 4

Best option is to use array_key_last which is available for PHP >= 7.3.0 or for older versions, we use count to get the last index (only for unassociated arrays):

// returns null for empty arrays
>>> $arr = []
>>> array_key_last($arr)
=> null

// returns last index of the array
>>> $arr = [1, 2, 3, false]
>>> array_key_last($arr)
=> 3

// returns last index of the array
>>> $arr = [1, 2, 3, false, 4]
>>> array_key_last($arr)
=> 4

For older versions, we can use count:

>>> $arr = []
>>> if (count($arr) > 0) $arr[count($arr) - 1]
// No excecution

>>> $arr = [1, 2, 3, false]
>>> if (count($arr) > 0) $arr[count($arr) - 1]
=> false

>>> $arr = [1, 2, 3, false, 4]
>>> if (count($arr) > 0) $arr[count($arr) - 1]
=> 4

That's all for unassociated arrays. If we are sure that we have associated arrays, then we can use end.

0

Note: For (PHP 7 >= 7.3.0) we can use array_key_last — Gets the last key of an array

array_key_last ( array $array ) : mixed

Ref: http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-key-last.php

0
-1

What if you want to get the last element of array inside of the loop of it's array?

The code below will result into an infinite loop:

foreach ($array as $item) {
 $last_element = end($array);
 reset($array);
 if ($last_element == $item) {
   // something useful here
 }
}

The solution is obviously simple for non associative arrays:

$last_element = $array[sizeof ($array) - 1];
foreach ($array as $key => $item) {
 if ($last_element == $item) {
   // something useful here
 }
}
4
  • 2
    I know about end() and reset() functions. My comment was related to loops like foreach or while where you cannot use these functions because reset function resets the inner pointer of an array which is used in the loop for iteration. Sorry for that, the question was more simple, I just wanted to give more advanced situation I came across in my project. Best regards. Commented Jan 28, 2013 at 12:45
  • This is wrong in many ways (arrays with duplicates, non-strict comparison...) and in any case not really related to the question.
    – Tgr
    Commented Oct 22, 2016 at 2:54
  • use the end($array) function to get the last element, why you unnecessarily using loops? Commented Jan 15, 2019 at 5:41
  • 1
    @MahakChoudhary My comment is an addition to "how to get last element of array if you are doing some manipulations already inside a loop of this array. Using end() will reset the innver pointer and break iteration loop. Cheers! Commented Oct 12, 2019 at 22:51
-1
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                           $ext_thumb = extension($file_name_dm);

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    $str=strtolower(end($str));
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-1

Use the end() function.

$array = [1,2,3,4,5];
$last = end($array); // 5
2
  • 1
    Just pay attention that this function moves your array's pointer to that position. Commented Jan 10, 2019 at 12:15
  • 1
    Also pay attention that this was posted as an answer 8 years previous. stackoverflow.com/a/3687368/1255289
    – miken32
    Commented Nov 16, 2019 at 17:37

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