111

How I can delete all records from all tables of my database? Can I do it with one SQL command or I need for one SQL command per one table?

10 Answers 10

175

SQLMenace's solution worked for me with a slight tweak to how data is deleted - DELETE FROM instead of TRUNCATE.

-- disable referential integrity
EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL' 
GO 

EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'DELETE FROM ?' 
GO 

-- enable referential integrity again 
EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? WITH CHECK CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL' 
GO
  • Me To.. I was able to delete, but not to truncate. – Marcel Oct 8 '12 at 8:54
  • 17
    It might also make sense to do a EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'DBCC CHECKIDENT(''?'', RESEED, 0)' after the DELETE FROM to reset all the identity columns back to 0. – Jonathan Amend Nov 7 '13 at 21:46
  • Its always a good start to the day when you find 6 lines of code that replaces 100s of delete statements! This method works without issue on SQL 2014 Express. – Tommy Apr 8 '15 at 14:21
  • 1
    Don't forget to disable triggers aswell – Edwin Stoteler Jan 27 '16 at 10:37
  • 7
    I was getting error - DELETE failed because the following SET options have incorrect settings: 'QUOTED_IDENTIFIER'.... For me worked: EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON; DELETE FROM ?' – kasi Mar 1 '16 at 9:43
35

Usually I will just use the undocumented proc sp_MSForEachTable

-- disable referential integrity
EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL' 
GO 

EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'TRUNCATE TABLE ?' 
GO 

-- enable referential integrity again 
EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL' 
GO

See also: Delete all data in database (when you have FKs)

  • 1
    I don't think this works. Looks like Kalen Delaney was inadvertently responsible for starting this idea off. Here she clarifies "you have to drop the referencing constraint in order to truncate the table." – Martin Smith Oct 2 '10 at 0:38
  • 1
    Does not work for me. – AH. Jun 4 '12 at 5:39
  • 2
    This does not work, despite being marked as the answer. Setting nocheck constraint on foreign keys does not allow you to run truncate commands on those tables. You will still get errors that prevent you from truncating. – Fourth Aug 7 '13 at 19:28
  • 2
    This does not work. – Dave Mar 7 '14 at 17:46
  • 3
    this does not work due to the presence of foreign keys. Still I can't see why it was accepted as an answer :/ – mounaim Sep 15 '14 at 9:30
16
/* Drop all non-system stored procs */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'P' AND category = 0 ORDER BY [name])

WHILE @name is not null
BEGIN
    SELECT @SQL = 'DROP PROCEDURE [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +']'
    EXEC (@SQL)
    PRINT 'Dropped Procedure: ' + @name
    SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'P' AND category = 0 AND [name] > @name ORDER BY [name])
END
GO

/* Drop all views */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'V' AND category = 0 ORDER BY [name])

WHILE @name IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    SELECT @SQL = 'DROP VIEW [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +']'
    EXEC (@SQL)
    PRINT 'Dropped View: ' + @name
    SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'V' AND category = 0 AND [name] > @name ORDER BY [name])
END
GO

/* Drop all functions */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] IN (N'FN', N'IF', N'TF', N'FS', N'FT') AND category = 0 ORDER BY [name])

WHILE @name IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    SELECT @SQL = 'DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +']'
    EXEC (@SQL)
    PRINT 'Dropped Function: ' + @name
    SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] IN (N'FN', N'IF', N'TF', N'FS', N'FT') AND category = 0 AND [name] > @name ORDER BY [name])
END
GO

/* Drop all Foreign Key constraints */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @constraint VARCHAR(254)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' ORDER BY TABLE_NAME)

WHILE @name is not null
BEGIN
    SELECT @constraint = (SELECT TOP 1 CONSTRAINT_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' AND TABLE_NAME = @name ORDER BY CONSTRAINT_NAME)
    WHILE @constraint IS NOT NULL
    BEGIN
        SELECT @SQL = 'ALTER TABLE [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +'] DROP CONSTRAINT [' + RTRIM(@constraint) +']'
        EXEC (@SQL)
        PRINT 'Dropped FK Constraint: ' + @constraint + ' on ' + @name
        SELECT @constraint = (SELECT TOP 1 CONSTRAINT_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' AND CONSTRAINT_NAME <> @constraint AND TABLE_NAME = @name ORDER BY CONSTRAINT_NAME)
    END
SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' ORDER BY TABLE_NAME)
END
GO

/* Drop all Primary Key constraints */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @constraint VARCHAR(254)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY' ORDER BY TABLE_NAME)

WHILE @name IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    SELECT @constraint = (SELECT TOP 1 CONSTRAINT_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY' AND TABLE_NAME = @name ORDER BY CONSTRAINT_NAME)
    WHILE @constraint is not null
    BEGIN
        SELECT @SQL = 'ALTER TABLE [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +'] DROP CONSTRAINT [' + RTRIM(@constraint)+']'
        EXEC (@SQL)
        PRINT 'Dropped PK Constraint: ' + @constraint + ' on ' + @name
        SELECT @constraint = (SELECT TOP 1 CONSTRAINT_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY' AND CONSTRAINT_NAME <> @constraint AND TABLE_NAME = @name ORDER BY CONSTRAINT_NAME)
    END
SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY' ORDER BY TABLE_NAME)
END
GO

/* Drop all tables */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'U' AND category = 0 ORDER BY [name])

WHILE @name IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    SELECT @SQL = 'DROP TABLE [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +']'
    EXEC (@SQL)
    PRINT 'Dropped Table: ' + @name
    SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'U' AND category = 0 AND [name] > @name ORDER BY [name])
END
GO
  • 1
    this actually worked for me – Prashant Bhanarkar Aug 17 '16 at 6:41
  • interesting script, that does not make use of the undcoumented stored proc 'sp_MSForEachTable', which is missing on Azure. Needs tweaking if you have objects on another schema than [dbo], though. – Pac0 Oct 30 '18 at 13:56
  • Please use gist.github.com/metaskills/893599 to create sp_MSForEachTable in Azure – Harpal Oct 31 '18 at 4:33
15

I'm aware this is late, but I agree with AlexKuznetsov's suggestion to script the database, rather than going through the hassle of purging the data from the tables. If the TRUNCATE solution will not work, and you happen to have a large amount of data, issuing (logged) DELETE statements might take a long time, and you'll be left with identifiers that have not been reseeded (i.e. an INSERT statement into a table with an IDENTITY column would get you an ID of 50000 instead of an ID of 1).

To script a whole database, in SSMS, right-click the database, then select TASKS -> Generate scripts:

enter image description here

Click Next to skip the Wizard opening screen, and then select which objects you want to script:

enter image description here

In the Set scripting options screen, you can pick settings for the scripting, like whether to generate 1 script for all the objects, or separate scripts for the individual objects, and whether to save the file in Unicode or ANSI:

enter image description here

The wizard will show a summary, which you can use to verify everything is as desired, and close by clicking on 'Finish'.

5

It is usually much faster to script out all the objects in the database, and create an empty one, that to delete from or truncate tables.

5
  1. First you'll have to disable all the triggers :

    sp_msforeachtable 'ALTER TABLE ? DISABLE TRIGGER all';
    
  2. Run this script : (Taken from this post Thank you @SQLMenace)

    SET NOCOUNT ON
    GO
    
    SELECT 'USE [' + db_name() +']';
    ;WITH a AS 
    (
         SELECT 0 AS lvl, 
                t.object_id AS tblID 
         FROM sys.TABLES t
         WHERE t.is_ms_shipped = 0
           AND t.object_id NOT IN (SELECT f.referenced_object_id 
                                   FROM sys.foreign_keys f)
    
         UNION ALL
    
         SELECT a.lvl + 1 AS lvl, 
                f.referenced_object_id AS tblId
         FROM a
         INNER JOIN sys.foreign_keys f ON a.tblId = f.parent_object_id 
                                       AND a.tblID <> f.referenced_object_id
    )
    SELECT 
        'Delete from ['+ object_schema_name(tblID) + '].[' + object_name(tblId) + ']' 
    FROM a
    GROUP BY tblId 
    ORDER BY MAX(lvl),1
    

This script will produce DELETE statements in proper order. starting from referenced tables then referencing ones

  1. Copy the DELETE FROM statements and run them once

  2. enable triggers

    sp_msforeachtable 'ALTER TABLE ? ENABLE TRIGGER all'
    
  3. Commit the changes :

    begin transaction
    commit;
    
  • This does not work for me, the recursive query ends up in a loop. Perhaps because of self reverenses. – Edwin Stoteler Jan 27 '16 at 10:32
3

Below a script that I used to remove all data from an SQL Server database

------------------------------------------------------------
/* Use database */ 
-------------------------------------------------------------

use somedatabase;

GO

------------------------------------------------------------------
/* Script to delete an repopulate the base [init database] */
------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------------
/* Procedure delete all constraints */ 
-------------------------------------------------------------

IF EXISTS (SELECT name  
           FROM  sysobjects 
           WHERE name = 'sp_DeleteAllConstraints' AND type = 'P')
    DROP PROCEDURE dbo.sp_DeleteAllConstraints
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE sp_DeleteAllConstraints
AS
    EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL'
    EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? DISABLE TRIGGER ALL'
GO

-----------------------------------------------------
/* Procedure delete all data from the database */ 
-----------------------------------------------------

IF EXISTS (SELECT name  
           FROM  sysobjects 
           WHERE name = 'sp_DeleteAllData' AND type = 'P')
    DROP PROCEDURE dbo.sp_DeleteAllData
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE sp_DeleteAllData
AS
    EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'DELETE FROM ?'
GO

-----------------------------------------------
/* Procedure enable all constraints */ 
-----------------------------------------------

IF EXISTS (SELECT name  
           FROM  sysobjects 
           WHERE name = 'sp_EnableAllConstraints' AND type = 'P')
    DROP PROCEDURE dbo.sp_EnableAllConstraints
GO
-- ....
-- ....
-- ....
0
EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL'

EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? DISABLE TRIGGER ALL'

EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'DELETE FROM ?'

EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL'

EXEC sp_MSForEachTable 'ALTER TABLE ? ENABLE TRIGGER ALL'

EXEC sp_MSFOREACHTABLE 'SELECT * FROM ?'

GO
0

As an alternative answer, if you Visual Studio SSDT or possibly Red Gate Sql Compare, you could simply run a schema comparison, script it out, drop the old database (possibly make a backup first in case there would be a reason that you will need that data), and then create a new database with the script created by the comparison tool. While on a very small database this may be more work, on a very large database it will be much quicker to simply drop the database then to deal with the different triggers and constraints that may be on the database.

-1

Yes, it is possible to delete with a single line of code

SELECT 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' + d.NAME + ';' 
FROM   sys.tables d 
WHERE  type = 'U' 
  • This gives me a new table with a truncate statement for each table. It does not actually delete anything, and unfortunately does it take care of the problem of dropping constraints first. Too bad, I was hoping for an answer like that, without the use of sp_MSForEachTable (which doesn't exist for me, Azure SQL Server)! – Pac0 Oct 30 '18 at 13:36
  • yes. true. its create truncate script for all tables. Use that script to delete tables data. – Buddhika De Silva Feb 13 at 9:07
  • This solution only works in the event that there aren't any relationships, as it has no way of guaranteeing that the tables are dropped in the correct order. Also, if there are any triggers on deletions of data this could pose unintended consequences. – dmoore1181 May 22 at 18:42

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