12

I have been trying to pass variable arguments to other function in C but it is producing inconsistent result in different runtime environment as well as in different runs in same environment:

int main() 
{ 
    int result = myprintf("Something \n %d", 9); 
    return result;
}

int myprintf(const char *format, ...){
    printf("Something \n %d", 9); 
    printf("\n");
    va_list args;        
    va_start(args, format);    
    int result = printf(format,args);
    printf("\n");
    va_end(args);
    return result;
} 

And the result produced is:

WWW.FIRMCODES.COM 
 9
WWW.FIRMCODES.COM 
 438656664

I could not find the reason for "438656664".

3
  • 2
    You can't do that; you can pass the args only to functions that take va_args as argument. These have a v in their name: vprintf, vfprintf, vsnprintf. – M Oehm Apr 27 '16 at 6:06
  • In case if I need to create a wrapper over printf() function then how can I proceed?I was thinking that I can create a function and after some manipulation of format string I will call printf(). But as you suggested I should call the "v" family of functions ,right? – Monk Apr 27 '16 at 6:19
  • Yes, forwardng the va_list to the v family of functions is the way to go. You probably shouldn't manipulate the format string, though, at least not the format specifiers themselves. (You can get many compilers to check whether format string and arguments agree; gcc/clang do this via attributes, VC++ does this via SAL annotations. If you tamper with the format string, such checks will be pointless.) – M Oehm Apr 27 '16 at 6:24
17

You cannot pass the variadic arguments to a variadic function. Instead, you must call a function that takes a va_list as argument. The standard library provides variants of printf and scanf that take a va_list; their names have the prefix v.

Your example should look like:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

int printfln(const char *format, ...)
{
    int result;
    va_list args;

    va_start(args, format);
    result = vprintf(format, args);
    printf("\n");
    va_end(args);

    return result;
}

int main()
{
    int result = printfln("Something \n %d", 9);

    printf("(%d)\n", result);

    return 0;
}

There are some gotchas, for example when you want to call two v... function for printing to the screen and a log file: The v... function may exhaust the va_list, so you must pass in a fresh one to each call if your code should be portable.

3
  • 2
    va_copy can be used to obtain "a fresh one" before you exhaust it, and va_end must be used to release the copy. – Sam Liddicott Aug 9 '17 at 7:35
  • Strongly suggest you to read this stackoverflow.com/a/26919307/802708 , it demonstrate how to write a function with va_list argument. – tangxinfa Jul 20 '18 at 11:45
  • @tangxinfa: No need, I already know how to do that. (If your concern is that my answer doesn't address accessing the va_list several times, that's not what the question is about.) – M Oehm Jul 20 '18 at 11:50

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