2

I read David Walsh article about using generators in async tasks (https://davidwalsh.name/async-generators) and I wanted to do the same thing. Here's my code:

function request(time) {
    let rand = Math.random()*10;
    console.log(`rand is ${rand}`);
    setTimeout(function(rand){
        it.next(rand)
    }, time);
}

function *main() {
    let result1 = yield request(5);
    result1 = parseInt(result1);
    let result2 = yield request(result1);

    console.log(`result1 is ${result1} and result2 is ${result2}`);
}

let it = main();
it.next();

but in console I can see

rand is 6.367766260304355
rand is 0.3009188563265597
result1 is NaN and result2 is undefined

As far as I can see when script reaches let rand = Math.random()*10 for the first time value is saved in rand, but then it goes to setTimeout but not goes into but reaches it.next() at the end of the script and then goes back to inside of the setTimeout, but this time rand is undefined. Why is that? How can I preserve value of rand and pass it to result1?

Edit: OK, when I edited

function request(time) {
    setTimeout(function(){
        let rand = Math.random()*10;
        console.log(`rand is ${rand}`);
        it.next(rand)
    }, time);
}

it works fine. Seems I can't pass a value to setTimeout... Why?

3

You can pass arguments to a function called by timer, but not the way you tried.

You need to pass those arguments to the setTimeout itself.

var timeoutID = window.setTimeout(func, [delay, param1, param2, ...]);


function request(time) {
    let rand = Math.random()*10;
    console.log(`rand is ${rand}`);
    setTimeout(function(rand){
        it.next(rand)
    }, time, rand);
}

But it's not necessary in your case. You have rand accessible inside inner function scope.

function request(time) {
    let rand = Math.random()*10;
    console.log(`rand is ${rand}`);
    setTimeout(function(){
        it.next(rand); 
    }, time);
}
1

You've got two rand variables in your code:

let rand = Math.random()*10;
//  ^^^^
…
setTimeout(function(rand) {
//                  ^^^^
    …
}, time);

The parameter of that function declares a second variable that shadows the one from the outer scope. As the callback function is not passed any arguments, its value is undefined - and that's what you are passing to next.

Just don't declare that parameter, and the outer rand will be available in the callback by closure.

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