3

Code:

var x = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    setTimeout( function() {
        console.log( 'x done' );
        resolve()
    }, 1000 );
});


Promise.resolve().then(x).then((resolve, reject) => {
    console.log( 'all done' );
});

Output:

all done
x done

Expected output:

x done
all done

Why is the promise x not waiting to resolve before calling the next then callback?

JSFiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/puhbqtu0/1/

  • 2
    then expects a function as its argument, not a promise. – Bergi Apr 27 '16 at 12:23
  • 1
    because then() needs a function as argument, not a promise. So, the next then is executed after x is run, not resolved. – Deblaton Jean-Philippe Apr 27 '16 at 12:23
  • 1
    You should return x in then: then(() => x). – alexmac Apr 27 '16 at 12:23
  • Did you mean x.then(() => console.log('all done'));? – Bergi Apr 27 '16 at 12:23
  • @AlexanderMac - can you write that up as an answer. Will choose it. Thanks! – HyderA Apr 27 '16 at 12:25
6

So as you want to run promises in a series you should convert x to function and call it in then:

function x() {
  return new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      console.log('x done');
      resolve()
    }, 1000);
  });
});

Promise.resolve()
  .then(x)
  .then(() => console.log('all done'));

or simplest variant:

x().then(() => console.log('all done'));

jsfiddle demo

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That's likely to be an antipattern which might end up with unhandled rejections. You shouldn't inject promises into a chain like that. – Bergi Apr 27 '16 at 12:29
  • @Bergi - what do you suggest for running promises in a series? – HyderA Apr 27 '16 at 12:30
  • @Bergi please clarify why it's bad. – alexmac Apr 27 '16 at 12:33
  • To run them in series, you'd need to call the setTimeout from that then(() => …) callback, e.g. by wrapping x in a factory function. Currently Promise.resolve() and x are concurrent (and if you want that, you'd better use Promise.all). – Bergi Apr 27 '16 at 12:37
  • 1
    Or convert x to function and call it in then. – alexmac Apr 27 '16 at 12:40

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