1

I have a large Typescript project that gets Concatenated in to a single JS file for deployment. What is the correct way to ensure that the files are given in the correct order for concatenation? There are far too many files to try and maintain it by hand.

If a class in file A is dependent on a class in file B, then the ordering of the classes in the resultant concatenated file is important. If file B appears later than file A then at runtime the class cannot be resolved.

This must surely be a common problem and there should be a simple solution to it. One caveat is that I use namespaces and not modules. I'm not sure if using modules across the project would resolve this issue at all.

Here is a quick example TestClassA.ts

namespace Test {
    'use strict';

    import TestClassB = Test.TestClassB;

    export class TestClassA {
        private test: TestClassB;
        constructor() {
            this.test = new TestClassB();
        }
    }
}

TestClassB.ts

namespace Test {
    'use strict';

    export class TestClassB {

        private value: string;

        constructor() {
            this.value = 'test';
        }
    }
}

TestClass.spec.ts

'use strict';

describe('test', (): void => {
    it ('should create an object', (): void => {
        let a: Test.TestClassA = new Test.TestClassA();

        expect(a).toBeDefined();
    });
});

In the Karma.config file specify the files as

files: [
      'src/**/*.js',
      'test/**/*.spec.js'
    ],

the test will fail with the exception TestClassB is not a constructor.

If instead I specify the Karma.config files as files: ['src/TestClassB.ts','src/TestClassA.ts','test/**/*.spec.ts']

Then the test will pass.

But doing this for a project with hundreds of files becomes unmaintainable.

  • I have now found that if I fully quantify the name of TestClassB as Test.TestClassB when using it in TestClassA, then all is fine and it works. I would have thought that is what the aliasing with the import statement was doing. – LIZA Roberts Apr 28 '16 at 4:58
2

Use ES6 imports/exports with a bundler, for example with webpack.

Code

// File TestClassA.ts

import TestClassB from './TestClassB';

export default class TestClassA {
  private test: TestClassB;
  constructor() {
    this.test = new TestClassB();
  }
}

// File TestClassB.ts

export default class TestClassB {
  private value: string;
  constructor() {
    this.value = 'test';
  }
}

Configuration

// File tsconfig.json

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    // ...
    "module": "commonjs",
    "noEmit": true
  }
  // ...
}

// File webpack.config.js

var path = require("path");

module.exports = {
  entry: path.join(__dirname, "TestClassA.ts"),
  output: {
    path: __dirname,
    filename: "bundle.js"
  },
  resolve: {
    extensions: ["", ".webpack.js", ".web.js", ".ts", ".js"]
  },
  module: {
    loaders: [
      {
        test: /\.ts$/,
        loader: "ts",
        query: {
          "compilerOptions": {
            "noEmit": false
          }
        }
      }
    ]
  }
};

Notice: See the link upstairs to understand this configuration.

Commands

# Install (to run once)
npm install -g webpack typescript
npm install ts-loader typescript

# Make the bundle
webpack
  • If you look at the additional edits to the question, does your answer still apply? I don't think it does. – LIZA Roberts Apr 28 '16 at 4:59
  • @LIZARoberts I don't use Karma, I can't help you to configure it. But I added an example of using ES6 imports/exports instead of namespaces. – Paleo Apr 28 '16 at 9:02
0

As Paleo suggested, the preferred way of separating code into multiple files is by using modules instead of namespaces. I've been in your shoes, namespaces are indeed better suited for creating a compiled concatenated output, but it's simply ignored by both the developers and most of the community.

For non-trivial projects you are basically forced to use modules, for which the preferred syntax is the ES6 syntax:

import { ... } from "./path/to/module-file";

This will have to be handled by either an ES6 browser, a module loading system for <ES6 browsers (RequireJS), or the NodeJS built-in module loading system. Modules certainly have their advantages, but they are not an obvious replacement for namespaces.


However, there is one theoretical solution I know: if you have a designated root file, and your namespace structure reflects the directory layout (eg.: namespace Test.Helpers is in the folder test/helpers, see below linked question), it's easy to write a tool that recursively scans your files for import X = ... statements, and then creates a _references.ts file containing the ordered list of reference paths. Something similar should be done by the TypeScript compiler, but it is not.

When compiling in visual studio, this _references.ts file is automatically recognized and passed to the compiler, but AFAIK, you can manually pass that file to the compiler as well, simply by:

tsc _references.ts --out test.js

Which will then also compile the files referenced within.

I was using this approach myself with a custom-made ~200 line bundling program written in C# before switching to the ES6 module import syntax. There are a few caveats you have to watch out for:

  • import X = ... statements can use a relative path from any namespace when multiple namespaces are nested. You either need to force yourself to using absolute namespace names only, or handle all cases.
  • Circular dependencies must be checked for.
  • Possibly more that I didn't encounter...
  • I have ended up building a tool like this that searches through the code and creates an output file of the source files in an order that would remove the issue. Those files with the least dependencies are listed first etc. But, that then can be imported by Grunt for Concatenation but difficult to get working for Wallaby or Karma. I found a simple solution though to my issue though. Don't use import statements for Aliasing. It is the import statement that causes the problem. That creates a local type that is set to the Type that is being aliased. When in the wrong order this is undefined. – LIZA Roberts Apr 28 '16 at 10:34
  • @LIZARoberts But then you have to type the fully qualified name every time, right? IMO, extracting import aliasing can provide a decent solution, as long as their contents are standardized in a way. At least, it proved to be useful for me. – John Weisz Apr 28 '16 at 11:00

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