9

Is there an easy way to programmatically create a 2d array in javascript?

What I don't want:

var array2D = [ 
  [0,0,0],
  [0,0,0],
  [0,0,0]
]
11

Well, you could write a helper function:

function zeros(dimensions) {
    var array = [];

    for (var i = 0; i < dimensions[0]; ++i) {
        array.push(dimensions.length == 1 ? 0 : zeros(dimensions.slice(1)));
    }

    return array;
}

> zeros([5, 3]);
  [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]

Bonus: handles any number of dimensions.

  • @Tom Aye, good call. Rewritten. – John Kugelman Sep 11 '10 at 5:47
  • Change item to a lambda that is a factory for items. – Ates Goral Sep 11 '10 at 5:48
  • 2
    This could be written much more clearly. Typically when you're writing a recursive function, you should make sure that the base case and inductive case are easily identified. In the code above, both are on the same line -- very confusing. Instead, I would recommend that you check the dimensions.length === 1 conditional at the top of the function and that you create two for loops -- one that creates an array of 0s (the base case) and one that creates an array with zeros function calls (the inductive case). Though the resulting code will be more verbose, it's much less confusing. – Xavi Sep 11 '10 at 6:19
22

Solution 2017:

Late to the Party, but this Post is still high up in the Google search results.

To create an empty 2D-Array with given size (adaptable for more dimensions):

let array = Array(rows).fill().map(() => Array(columns));

Prefilled 2D-Array:

let array = Array(rows).fill().map(() => Array(columns).fill(0));

E.g.:

Array(2).fill().map(() => Array(3).fill(42));
// Result:
// [[42, 42, 42],
//  [42, 42, 42]]

Warning:

Array(rows).fill(Array(columns)) will result in all rows being the reference to the same array!!


Update 24th September 2018 (thanks to @Tyler):

Another possible approach is to use Array.fill() to apply the map function.

E.g.:

Array.from(Array(2), _ => Array(3).fill(43));
// Result:
// [[43, 43, 43],
//  [43, 43, 43]]


Benchmark:

The map-approach seems to be about 70-80% faster. You can check here:

https://jsperf.com/multidimensional-array-map-vs-fill

  • 1
    That last warning was the most valuable part of your answer! I had been scratching my head on that one for a couple hours! – Michel Floyd Jul 22 '18 at 21:37
  • Glad it helped! Guess how I came around to add that to my answer... ;) – FatalMerlin Jul 23 '18 at 21:40
  • 1
    You wasted several hours in the debugger? ;) – Michel Floyd Jul 30 '18 at 12:37
  • 1
    Another alternative to consider: Array.from() can apply a map function on each element: Array.from(Array(rows), _ => Array(cols).fill(0)) – user5253639 Sep 23 '18 at 0:32
  • 1
    Thanks @Tyler, I've updated my answer. I've also benchmarked the two methods, see above for comparission. – FatalMerlin Sep 24 '18 at 10:25
8
function zero2D(rows, cols) {
  var array = [], row = [];
  while (cols--) row.push(0);
  while (rows--) array.push(row.slice());
  return array;
}
4

You can use the following function to create a 2D array of zeros:

const zeros = (m, n) => [...Array(m)].map(e => Array(n).fill(0));

console.log(zeros(3, 4));

// [ [ 0, 0, 0, 0 ],
//   [ 0, 0, 0, 0 ],
//   [ 0, 0, 0, 0 ] ]

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