19

Is there an easy way to programmatically create a 2d array in javascript?

What I don't want:

var array2D = [ 
  [0,0,0],
  [0,0,0],
  [0,0,0]
]
13

Well, you could write a helper function:

function zeros(dimensions) {
    var array = [];

    for (var i = 0; i < dimensions[0]; ++i) {
        array.push(dimensions.length == 1 ? 0 : zeros(dimensions.slice(1)));
    }

    return array;
}

> zeros([5, 3]);
  [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]

Bonus: handles any number of dimensions.

2
  • Change item to a lambda that is a factory for items. – Ates Goral Sep 11 '10 at 5:48
  • 2
    This could be written much more clearly. Typically when you're writing a recursive function, you should make sure that the base case and inductive case are easily identified. In the code above, both are on the same line -- very confusing. Instead, I would recommend that you check the dimensions.length === 1 conditional at the top of the function and that you create two for loops -- one that creates an array of 0s (the base case) and one that creates an array with zeros function calls (the inductive case). Though the resulting code will be more verbose, it's much less confusing. – Xavi Sep 11 '10 at 6:19
50

Solution 2017:

Late to the Party, but this Post is still high up in the Google search results.

To create an empty 2D-Array with given size (adaptable for more dimensions):

let array = Array(rows).fill().map(() => Array(columns));

Prefilled 2D-Array:

let array = Array(rows).fill().map(() => Array(columns).fill(0));

E.g.:

Array(2).fill().map(() => Array(3).fill(42));
// Result:
// [[42, 42, 42],
//  [42, 42, 42]]

Warning:

Array(rows).fill(Array(columns)) will result in all rows being the reference to the same array!!


Update 24th September 2018 (thanks to @Tyler):

Another possible approach is to use Array.fill() to apply the map function.

E.g.:

Array.from(Array(2), _ => Array(3).fill(43));
// Result:
// [[43, 43, 43],
//  [43, 43, 43]]

Benchmark:

https://jsperf.com/multi-dimensional-array-map-vs-fill/5

2
  • 1
    Nice answer. Using Array.from({ length: rows }, () => Array(columns).fill(value)); instead of Array.from(Array(rows), _ => Array(columns).fill(value)); would avoid creating the empty array. But I'm not sure which one is faster. – Robbendebiene Jun 23 '20 at 13:15
  • 1
    Richard Natal was nice enough to update the jsperf test for me, so I will just update the jsperf link. For me, the [...Array(1000)].map(e => Array(1000).fill(0)); approach is the fastest, closely followed by the for-loop variant. – FatalMerlin Jun 25 '20 at 18:44
8
function zero2D(rows, cols) {
  var array = [], row = [];
  while (cols--) row.push(0);
  while (rows--) array.push(row.slice());
  return array;
}
0
5

You can use the following function to create a 2D array of zeros:

const zeros = (m, n) => [...Array(m)].map(e => Array(n).fill(0));

console.log(zeros(3, 4));

// [ [ 0, 0, 0, 0 ],
//   [ 0, 0, 0, 0 ],
//   [ 0, 0, 0, 0 ] ]

0

A no-frills, easy-to-understand method for beginners:

function twoDarrMaker(row, col) {
  const twoDarr = [];

  for (let i = 0; i < row; i++) {
    let subarray = [];

    for (let j = 0; j < col; j++) {
      subarray.push(0);
    }

    twoDarr.push(subarray);
  }

  return twoDarr;
}

twoDarrMaker(3, 2);
// [
//   [ 0, 0 ],
//   [ 0, 0 ],
//   [ 0, 0 ]
// ]
1
  • Please, don't post code without an explanation as an answer. Try to explain what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are usually more helpful and of better quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes. – Zsolt Meszaros Jan 29 at 9:08

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