17

I'm converting a web forms application to asp.net core mvc. In my web forms application sometimes after I set some response cookies other code needs to see if they were set, and if so, access the cookie's properties (i.e. value, Expires, Secure, http). In webforms and MVC 5 it's possible to iterate over the cookies and return any particular cookies like so (old school I know)

       for(int i = 0; i < cookies.Count; i++) {
            if(cookies[i].Name == cookieName) {
                return cookies[i];
            }
        }

But the interface for accessing response cookies in asp.net core mvc looks like this:

response cookies interface

Based on this interface I don't see a way to check to see if a response cookie exists and obtain it's properties. But there has gotta be some way to do it?

In an action method I tried setting two cookies on the response object and then immediately trying to access them. But intellisense doesn't show any methods, properties or indexers that would allow me to access them:

enter image description here

For a moment, I thought that perhaps I could use Response.Cookies.ToString(); and just parse the information to find my cookie info, but alas, the ToString() call returns "Microsoft.AspNet.Http.Internal.ResponseCookies" because the object doesn't override the default implementation.

Just for fun I also checked the current dev branch of GitHub to see if the interface has changed since RC1 but it has not. So given this interface, how do I check for the existence of a response cookie and get it's properties? I've thought about trying to hack in via the response headers collection but that seems pretty lame.

4
  • Have you tried Response.Cookies in your action method?
    – Will Ray
    Apr 28 '16 at 14:21
  • Will I have. I will update the question to indicate that.
    – RonC
    Apr 28 '16 at 14:51
  • 1
    Oh, sorry. I meant Request.Cookies, my mistake!
    – Will Ray
    Apr 28 '16 at 15:40
  • @Will No worries. Based on your suggestion I tried adding a cookie to the response cookies and then checked the request cookies to see if I could gain access to the cookie that way. While the request cookies object does provide a way to read it's cookies, it turns out that adding a cookie to the response cookies does not add the cookie to the request cookies under the hood as is done in asp.net 4.x. So that approach dose not work either.
    – RonC
    Apr 28 '16 at 18:11
12

Here's how I get the value of a cookie from a Response. Something like this could be used to get the whole cookie if required:

string GetCookieValueFromResponse(HttpResponse response, string cookieName)
{
  foreach (var headers in response.Headers.Values)
    foreach (var header in headers)
      if (header.StartsWith($"{cookieName}="))
      {
        var p1 = header.IndexOf('=');
        var p2 = header.IndexOf(';');
        return header.Substring(p1 + 1, p2 - p1 - 1);
      }
  return null;
}
12

There is an extension method available in Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http.Extensions called GetTypedHeaders(). This can be called on HttpContext.Response to read Set-Cookie headers. For example in middleware perhaps we want to intercept a Set-Cookie response header and replace it:

  public async Task Invoke(HttpContext httpContext)
        {
            httpContext.Response.OnStarting(state =>
            {
                var context = (HttpContext)state;

                var setCookieHeaders = context.Response.GetTypedHeaders().SetCookie;

                // We assume only one cookie is found. You could loop over multiple matches instead.
                // setCookieHeaders may be null if response doesn't contain set-cookie headers
                var cookie = setCookieHeaders?.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Name == "mycookiename");

                if (cookie == null)
                {
                    return Task.CompletedTask;
                }

                var opts = new CookieOptions
                {
                    HttpOnly = true,
                    Expires = DateTimeOffset.Now.AddHours(12),
                    SameSite = SameSiteMode.Lax,
                    Secure = true
                };

                context.Response.Cookies.Delete(cookie.Name.Value);
                context.Response.Cookies.Append(cookie.Name.Value, "mynewcookievalue", opts);
                
                return Task.CompletedTask;

            }, httpContext);

            await _next(httpContext);
        }
1
  • Nice. This does seem like the better modern way to get access to the response cookies.
    – RonC
    Feb 7 '20 at 21:07
7

There is an obvious problem with Shaun's answer: it will match any HTTP-header having matching value. The idea should be to match only cookies.

A minor change like this should do the trick:

string GetCookieValueFromResponse(HttpResponse response, string cookieName)
{
  foreach (var headers in response.Headers)
  {
    if (headers.Key != "Set-Cookie")
      continue;
    string header = headers.Value;
    if (header.StartsWith($"{cookieName}="))
    {
      var p1 = header.IndexOf('=');
      var p2 = header.IndexOf(';');
      return header.Substring(p1 + 1, p2 - p1 - 1);
    }
  }
  return null;
}

Now the checking for a cookie name will target only actual cookie-headers.

5
  • 1
    Interesting catch. I also now see Shaun is using a loop in a loop which I also don't think is right. I guess I just took from his answer that the value needed to be looped through which I ultimately did. I checked my code and I check that header.Key == "Set-Cookie" which I think is probably right rather than Cookie
    – RonC
    Sep 19 '18 at 15:42
  • My bad, I looked closer at my code, the two loops are required.
    – RonC
    Sep 19 '18 at 15:44
  • Ron's comment is correct. It is Set-Cookie on response. Cookie on request. Sep 20 '18 at 5:44
  • 1
    This will get the first cookie assignment in the response. If the cookie is set twice, the 2nd time will overwrite the first, and the client will effectively have the 2nd value?
    – cat_in_hat
    Apr 24 '19 at 20:29
  • 1
    @cat_in_hat absolutely correct. My code will pick the first instance, any RFC-compliant client will pick the last value. Jun 3 '20 at 5:46
3

You can use this function to get full information about the cookie set value

private SetCookieHeaderValue GetCookieValueFromResponse(HttpResponse response, string cookieName)
{
        var cookieSetHeader = response.GetTypedHeaders().SetCookie;
        if (cookieSetHeader != null)
        {
            var setCookie = cookieSetHeader.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Name == cookieName);
            return setCookie;
        }
        return null;
}
1

In my case I had to get only value of auth= and don't care about other values, but you can easy rewrite code to get dict of cookie values.

I wrote this extension for HttpResponseMessage, in order to avoid work with index and substring, I separate string to array and then cast it to dictionary

    internal static string GetCookieValueFromResponse(this HttpResponseMessage httpResponse, string cookieName)
    {

        foreach (var cookieStr in httpResponse.Headers.GetValues("Set-Cookie"))
        {
            if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(cookieStr))
                continue;

            var array = cookieStr.Split(';')
                .Where(x => x.Contains('=')).Select(x => x.Trim());

            var dict = array.Select(item => item.Split(new[] {'='}, 2)).ToDictionary(s => s[0], s => s[1]);


            if (dict.ContainsKey(cookieName))
                return dict[cookieName];
        }

        return null;
    }
1

You can get the cookie string value from the response using this method. In this case, I'm using this logic in a CookieService, that is the reason you will see that I'm using the _contextAccessor. Notice that in this case, I'm returning null if the value of the cookie is empty. (This is optional)

    private string GetCookieFromResponse(string cookieName)
    {
        var cookieSetHeader = _contextAccessor.HttpContext.Response.GetTypedHeaders().SetCookie;
        var cookie = cookieSetHeader?.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Name == cookieName && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.Value.ToString()));
        var cookieValue = cookie?.Value.ToString();
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(cookieValue))
        {
            cookieValue = Uri.UnescapeDataString(cookieValue);
        }

        return cookieValue;
    }

If you are looking for a solution that gets the cookie from the response or the request in that order then you can use this.

    private string GetCookieString(string cookieName)
    {
        return GetCartCookieFromResponse(cookieName) ?? GetCartCookieFromRequest(cookieName) ?? "";
    }

    private string GetCookieFromRequest(string cookieName)
    {
        return _contextAccessor.HttpContext.Request.Cookies.ContainsKey(cookieName) ? _contextAccessor.HttpContext.Request.Cookies[cookieName] : null;
    }

    private string GetCookieFromResponse(string cookieName)
    {
        var cookieSetHeader = _contextAccessor.HttpContext.Response.GetTypedHeaders().SetCookie;
        var cookie = cookieSetHeader?.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Name == cookieName && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.Value.ToString()));
        var cookieValue = cookie?.Value.ToString();
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(cookieValue))
        {
            cookieValue = Uri.UnescapeDataString(cookieValue);
        }

        return cookieValue;
    }
2
  • This looks pretty nice except that if the cookie has a blank value it will return null rather than a blank string. This could be solved by removing the && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.Value.ToString()
    – RonC
    Oct 2 '20 at 19:12
  • 1
    Hi @RonC, you are right, I added that verification because I want to ensure the cookie has value. If not, I will look for the cookie in the request. the null return was intended in this case. I updated the answer including that logic. Thanks for the feedback.
    – AMore
    Oct 3 '20 at 5:50
0

The snippet seems to work for me. The result for me (derived from Shaun and Ron) looks like:

        public static string GetCookieValueFromResponse(HttpResponse response, string cookieName)
        {
            // inspect the cookies in HttpResponse.

            string match = $"{cookieName}=";
            var p1 = match.Length;

            foreach (var headers in response.Headers)
            {
                if (headers.Key != "Set-Cookie")
                    continue;
                foreach (string header in headers.Value)
                {
                    if (header.StartsWith(match) && header.Length > p1 && header[p1] != ';')
                    {
                        var p2 = header.IndexOf(';', p1);
                        return header.Substring(p1 + 1, p2 - p1 - 1);
                    }
                }
            }
            return null;
        }
0

In cases where multiple "Set-Cookie" headers exists the last one should be used:

    private string GetCookieValueFromResponse(Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http.HttpResponse response, string cookieName)
    {

        var value = string.Empty;

        foreach (var header in response.Headers["Set-Cookie"])
        {
            if (!header.Trim().StartsWith($"{cookieName}="))
                continue;

            var p1 = header.IndexOf('=');
            var p2 = header.IndexOf(';');

            value = header.Substring(p1 + 1, p2 - p1 - 1);

        }

        return value;
    }
1
  • You're absolutely right on that. However, there is a minor issue in your code. It isn't checking for the fact that a Set-Cookie header exists. Earlier attempts by Shaun and me accounted for that. Minor fix, and it's perfect! Apr 25 '19 at 7:00

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