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This question already has an answer here:

I read this in include/linux/sched.h:

#define __set_task_state(tsk, state_value)              \
    do { (tsk)->state = (state_value); } while (0)

I know that when it comes to multi-statement in a body, a do {...} while (0) should be used. But that is just one statement in the body, is it really necessary to use do {...} while (0)? How about just as follows:

#define __set_task_state(tsk, state_value)              \
    ((tsk)->state = (state_value))

marked as duplicate by edmz, Vasfed, Basile Starynkevitch c Apr 28 '16 at 15:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    @trojanfoe Would you please let me know the specific part or the answer concerning one-statement body? I looked at the answers again and still didn't get it. Thank you. – password636 Apr 28 '16 at 10:16
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    Ah I see what you mean; apologies. I think you'll probably find that do { ... } while(0) is being used in the linux headers regardless of the number of statements within the "loop". This makes it easy to change to two-or-more statements later. – trojanfoe Apr 28 '16 at 10:22
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    @trojanfoe Ok, I get it. Thank you for answering. Should my topic still be duplicate? Or change it to normal so that other people won't skip or miss something here. – password636 Apr 28 '16 at 10:27
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    It's should not be a duplicate, however you need to flag for moderator attention to make that happen, sorry. My comment is also incorrect as I've just checked the linux kernel coding conventions and do/while is only mentioned when multiple statements are used within a macro. – trojanfoe Apr 28 '16 at 10:29
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    Sheesh. Hey, black, Vasfed, and Basile Starynkevitch: He's already explained that it's not a duplicate. The linked questions don't answer the sub-question, "Why would you use this technique for the body of a single-statement macro?" AIUI, the question has already been closed, and reopened, once already, and now you guys closed it again. Double Jeopardy! – Steve Summit Apr 28 '16 at 16:14
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It's true that when the body of the macro is a single statement or expression (as here), the use of the do { ... } while(0) trick is less compelling. There's not nearly as much wrong with

#define __set_task_state(tsk, state_value)              \
    ((tsk)->state = (state_value))

But I suspect we could still come up with cases where this "simpler" definition might cause problems, such that the do/while trick would still be advantageous. For example, if you accidentally wrote

__set_task_state(a, b)
do_something_else;

the error message you'd get for the missing semicolon might be less confusing in the do/while case. (Or not.)

In general, of course, function-like macros are often problematic, and inline functions are recommended. I can't say why an inline function wasn't used here. (There are certainly plenty of them elsewhere in the Linux kernel sources.)

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