67

This is my Async Validator it doesn't have a debounce time, how can I add it?

static emailExist(_signupService:SignupService) {
  return (control:Control) => {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      _signupService.checkEmail(control.value)
        .subscribe(
          data => {
            if (data.response.available == true) {
              resolve(null);
            } else {
              resolve({emailExist: true});
            }
          },
          err => {
            resolve({emailExist: true});
          })
      })
    }
}

12 Answers 12

31

It is actually pretty simple to achieve this (it is not for your case but it is general example)

private emailTimeout;

emailAvailability(control: Control) {
    clearTimeout(this.emailTimeout);
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        this.emailTimeout = setTimeout(() => {
            this._service.checkEmail({email: control.value})
                .subscribe(
                    response    => resolve(null),
                    error       => resolve({availability: true}));
        }, 600);
    });
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    I think this is the better solution. Because @Thierry Templier's solution wil delay all validation rules, not just the async one. – aegyed Oct 20 '16 at 9:48
  • 1
    @n00dl3's solution is more elegant and since rxjs is already available, why not use it to simplify matters more – Boban Stojanovski Apr 30 '18 at 22:27
  • @BobanStojanovski that question refers to angular 2. My solution works only with angular 4+. – n00dl3 Jun 26 '18 at 5:59
96

Angular 4+, Using Observable.timer(debounceTime) :

@izupet 's answer is right but it is worth noticing that it is even simpler when you use Observable:

emailAvailability(control: Control) {
    return Observable.timer(500).switchMap(()=>{
      return this._service.checkEmail({email: control.value})
        .mapTo(null)
        .catch(err=>Observable.of({availability: true}));
    });
}

Since angular 4 has been released, if a new value is sent for checking, Angular unsubscribes from Observable while it's still paused in the timer, so you don't actually need to manage the setTimeout/clearTimeout logic by yourself.

Using timer and Angular's async validator behavior we have recreated RxJS debounceTime.

| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    IMHO this is by far the most elegant solution for the "debounce" problem. Note: there is no subscribe() because when returning an Observable instead of a Promise the Observable must be cold. – Bernhard Fürst Aug 24 '17 at 14:19
  • 1
    problem solved, I was sending async validator alongside other validators. – Saman Mohamadi Dec 15 '17 at 10:29
  • 1
    @SamanMohamadi yeah was doing the same thing. To complete your comment, Angular has a third param that need to be passed for async validation: this.formBuilder.group({ fieldName: [initialValue, [SyncValidators], [AsyncValidators]] }); – guilima Apr 13 '18 at 12:25
  • 17
    @ChristianCederquist yes. also note that with Angular 6, Observable.timer have been changed for simply timer, and switchMap must be used with the pipe operator, so it give : timer(500).pipe(switchMap(()=>{})) – Félix Brunet Jun 27 '18 at 19:37
  • 1
    In face, the http request is canceled because the formControl unsubscribes from the observable. it is not because of switchMap. you could use mergeMap or ConcatMap with the same effect, because Timer emit only once. – Félix Brunet Jun 27 '18 at 19:53
32

Keep it simple: no timeout, no delay, no custom Observable

...
// assign async validator to a field
this.cardAccountNumber.setAsyncValidators(this.uniqueCardAccountValidatorFn());
...
// subscribe to control.valueChanges and define pipe
uniqueCardAccountValidatorFn(): AsyncValidatorFn {
  return control => control.valueChanges
    .pipe(
      debounceTime(400),
      distinctUntilChanged(),
      switchMap(value => this.customerService.isCardAccountUnique(value)),
      map((unique: boolean) => (unique ? null : {'cardAccountNumberUniquenessViolated': true})),
      first()); // important to make observable finite
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Possibly the best solution here – user3155561 Jul 16 '19 at 16:38
  • 3
    Using code similar to this but for me the debounce/distinctUntilChanged doesn't seem to do anything - validator fires immediately after each keypress. – Rick Strahl Nov 19 '19 at 20:58
  • 1
    Looks good but still doesn't seem to work for Angular Async validators – Laszlo Sarvold Jun 29 at 10:52
  • This will not work. The validator is waiting for a valueChanges event on the control that is running it's validator because a valueChanges event ran. The next change will unsubscribe the previous validator before running the next validation. This may appear to work but will fail on a slow enough process and always required another change to validate the last. – Jacob Roberts Sep 25 at 13:38
11

It's not possible out of the box since the validator is directly triggered when the input event is used to trigger updates. See this line in the source code:

If you want to leverage a debounce time at this level, you need to get an observable directly linked with the input event of the corresponding DOM element. This issue in Github could give you the context:

In your case, a workaround would be to implement a custom value accessor leveraging the fromEvent method of observable.

Here is a sample:

const DEBOUNCE_INPUT_VALUE_ACCESSOR = new Provider(
  NG_VALUE_ACCESSOR, {useExisting: forwardRef(() => DebounceInputControlValueAccessor), multi: true});

@Directive({
  selector: '[debounceTime]',
  //host: {'(change)': 'doOnChange($event.target)', '(blur)': 'onTouched()'},
  providers: [DEBOUNCE_INPUT_VALUE_ACCESSOR]
})
export class DebounceInputControlValueAccessor implements ControlValueAccessor {
  onChange = (_) => {};
  onTouched = () => {};
  @Input()
  debounceTime:number;

  constructor(private _elementRef: ElementRef, private _renderer:Renderer) {

  }

  ngAfterViewInit() {
    Observable.fromEvent(this._elementRef.nativeElement, 'keyup')
      .debounceTime(this.debounceTime)
      .subscribe((event) => {
        this.onChange(event.target.value);
      });
  }

  writeValue(value: any): void {
    var normalizedValue = isBlank(value) ? '' : value;
    this._renderer.setElementProperty(this._elementRef.nativeElement, 'value', normalizedValue);
  }

  registerOnChange(fn: () => any): void { this.onChange = fn; }
  registerOnTouched(fn: () => any): void { this.onTouched = fn; }
}

And use it this way:

function validator(ctrl) {
  console.log('validator called');
  console.log(ctrl);
}

@Component({
  selector: 'app'
  template: `
    <form>
      <div>
        <input [debounceTime]="2000" [ngFormControl]="ctrl"/>
      </div>
      value : {{ctrl.value}}
    </form>
  `,
  directives: [ DebounceInputControlValueAccessor ]
})
export class App {
  constructor(private fb:FormBuilder) {
    this.ctrl = new Control('', validator);
  }
}

See this plunkr: https://plnkr.co/edit/u23ZgaXjAvzFpeScZbpJ?p=preview.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    the async validator works great but my others validator doesn't seem to work though, e.g. *ngIf="(email.touched && email.errors) doesn't get triggered – Chanlito Apr 30 '16 at 12:31
5

an alternative solution with RxJs can be the following.

/**
 * From a given remove validation fn, it returns the AsyncValidatorFn
 * @param remoteValidation: The remote validation fn that returns an observable of <ValidationErrors | null>
 * @param debounceMs: The debounce time
 */
debouncedAsyncValidator<TValue>(
  remoteValidation: (v: TValue) => Observable<ValidationErrors | null>,
  remoteError: ValidationErrors = { remote: "Unhandled error occurred." },
  debounceMs = 300
): AsyncValidatorFn {
  const values = new BehaviorSubject<TValue>(null);
  const validity$ = values.pipe(
    debounceTime(debounceMs),
    switchMap(remoteValidation),
    catchError(() => of(remoteError)),
    take(1)
  );

  return (control: AbstractControl) => {
    if (!control.value) return of(null);
    values.next(control.value);
    return validity$;
  };
}

Usage:

const validator = debouncedAsyncValidator<string>(v => {
  return this.myService.validateMyString(v).pipe(
    map(r => {
      return r.isValid ? { foo: "String not valid" } : null;
    })
  );
});
const control = new FormControl('', null, validator);
| improve this answer | |
5

Angular 9+ asyncValidator w/ debounce

@n00dl3 has the correct answer. I love relying on the Angular code to unsubscribe and create a new async validator by throwing in a timed pause. Angular and RxJS APIs have evolved since that answer was written, so I'm posting some updated code.

Also, I made some changes. (1) The code should report a caught error, not hide it under a match on the email address, otherwise we will confuse the user. If the network's down, why say the email matched?! UI presentation code will differentiate between email collision and network error. (2) The validator should capture the control's value prior to the time delay to prevent any possible race conditions. (3) Use delay instead of timer because the latter will fire every half second and if we have a slow network and email check takes a long time (one second), timer will keep refiring the switchMap and the call will never complete.

Angular 9+ compatible fragment:

emailAvailableValidator(control: AbstractControl) {
  return of(control.value).pipe(
    delay(500),
    switchMap((email) => this._service.checkEmail(email).pipe(
      map(isAvail => isAvail ? null : { unavailable: true }),
      catchError(err => { error: err }))));
}

PS: Anyone wanting to dig deeper into the Angular sources (I highly recommend it), you can find the Angular code that runs asynchronous validation here and the code that cancels subscriptions here which calls into this. All the same file and all under updateValueAndValidity.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I really like this answer. timer was working for me until it wasn't. It was successfully cancelling the api request when the next validation would fire but it should not of made an api request in the first place. This solution is working well so far. – Jacob Roberts Sep 25 at 13:41
2

Here is an example from my live Angular project using rxjs6

import { ClientApiService } from '../api/api.service';
import { AbstractControl } from '@angular/forms';
import { HttpParams } from '@angular/common/http';
import { map, switchMap } from 'rxjs/operators';
import { of, timer } from 'rxjs/index';

export class ValidateAPI {
  static createValidator(service: ClientApiService, endpoint: string, paramName) {
    return (control: AbstractControl) => {
      if (control.pristine) {
        return of(null);
      }
      const params = new HttpParams({fromString: `${paramName}=${control.value}`});
      return timer(1000).pipe(
        switchMap( () => service.get(endpoint, {params}).pipe(
            map(isExists => isExists ? {valueExists: true} : null)
          )
        )
      );
    };
  }
}

and here is how I use it in my reactive form

this.form = this.formBuilder.group({
page_url: this.formBuilder.control('', [Validators.required], [ValidateAPI.createValidator(this.apiService, 'meta/check/pageurl', 'pageurl')])
});
| improve this answer | |
2

Here a service that returns a validator function that uses debounceTime(...) and distinctUntilChanged():

@Injectable({
  providedIn: 'root'
})
export class EmailAddressAvailabilityValidatorService {

  constructor(private signupService: SignupService) {}

  debouncedSubject = new Subject<string>();
  validatorSubject = new Subject();

  createValidator() {

    this.debouncedSubject
      .pipe(debounceTime(500), distinctUntilChanged())
      .subscribe(model => {

        this.signupService.checkEmailAddress(model).then(res => {
          if (res.value) {
            this.validatorSubject.next(null)
          } else {
            this.validatorSubject.next({emailTaken: true})
          }
        });
      });

    return (control: AbstractControl) => {

      this.debouncedSubject.next(control.value);

      let prom = new Promise<any>((resolve, reject) => {
        this.validatorSubject.subscribe(
          (result) => resolve(result)
        );
      });

      return prom
    };
  }
}

Usage:

emailAddress = new FormControl('',
    [Validators.required, Validators.email],
    this.validator.createValidator() // async
  );

If you add the validators Validators.required and Validators.email the request will only be made if the input string is non-empty and a valid email address. This should be done to avoid unnecessary API calls.

| improve this answer | |
  • If distinctUntilChanged() fails, I think the signupService won't execute therefore nothing will emit to the validatorSubject, and the form will stuck in PENDING status. – funkid Jun 1 '19 at 7:22
1

RxJS 6 example:

import { of, timer } from 'rxjs';
import { catchError, mapTo, switchMap } from 'rxjs/operators';      

validateSomething(control: AbstractControl) {
    return timer(SOME_DEBOUNCE_TIME).pipe(
      switchMap(() => this.someService.check(control.value).pipe(
          // Successful response, set validator to null
          mapTo(null),
          // Set error object on error response
          catchError(() => of({ somethingWring: true }))
        )
      )
    );
  }
| improve this answer | |
1

Things can be simplified a little bit

export class SomeAsyncValidator {
   static createValidator = (someService: SomeService) => (control: AbstractControl) =>
       timer(500)
           .pipe(
               map(() => control.value),
               switchMap((name) => someService.exists({ name })),
               map(() => ({ nameTaken: true })),
               catchError(() => of(null)));
}
| improve this answer | |
0

To anyone still interested in this subject, it's important to notice this in angular 6 document:

  1. They must return a Promise or an Observable,
  2. The observable returned must be finite, meaning it must complete at some point. To convert an infinite observable into a finite one, pipe the observable through a filtering operator such as first, last, take, or takeUntil.

Be careful with the 2nd requirement above.

Here's a AsyncValidatorFn implementation:

const passwordReapeatValidator: AsyncValidatorFn = (control: FormGroup) => {
  return of(1).pipe(
    delay(1000),
    map(() => {
      const password = control.get('password');
      const passwordRepeat = control.get('passwordRepeat');
      return password &&
        passwordRepeat &&
        password.value === passwordRepeat.value
        ? null
        : { passwordRepeat: true };
    })
  );
};
| improve this answer | |
-1

I had the same problem. I wanted a solution for debouncing the input and only request the backend when the input changed.

All workarounds with a timer in the validator have the problem, that they request the backend with every keystroke. They only debounce the validation response. That's not what's intended to do. You want the input to be debounced and distincted and only after that to request the backend.

My solution for that is the following (using reactive forms and material2):

The component

@Component({
    selector: 'prefix-username',
    templateUrl: './username.component.html',
    styleUrls: ['./username.component.css']
})
export class UsernameComponent implements OnInit, OnDestroy {

    usernameControl: FormControl;

    destroyed$ = new Subject<void>(); // observes if component is destroyed

    validated$: Subject<boolean>; // observes if validation responses
    changed$: Subject<string>; // observes changes on username

    constructor(
        private fb: FormBuilder,
        private service: UsernameService,
    ) {
        this.createForm();
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.changed$ = new Subject<string>();
        this.changed$

            // only take until component destroyed
            .takeUntil(this.destroyed$)

            // at this point the input gets debounced
            .debounceTime(300)

            // only request the backend if changed
            .distinctUntilChanged()

            .subscribe(username => {
                this.service.isUsernameReserved(username)
                    .subscribe(reserved => this.validated$.next(reserved));
            });

        this.validated$ = new Subject<boolean>();
        this.validated$.takeUntil(this.destroyed$); // only take until component not destroyed
    }

    ngOnDestroy(): void {
        this.destroyed$.next(); // complete all listening observers
    }

    createForm(): void {
        this.usernameControl = this.fb.control(
            '',
            [
                Validators.required,
            ],
            [
                this.usernameValodator()
            ]);
    }

    usernameValodator(): AsyncValidatorFn {
        return (c: AbstractControl) => {

            const obs = this.validated$
                // get a new observable
                .asObservable()
                // only take until component destroyed
                .takeUntil(this.destroyed$)
                // only take one item
                .take(1)
                // map the error
                .map(reserved => reserved ? {reserved: true} : null);

            // fire the changed value of control
            this.changed$.next(c.value);

            return obs;
        }
    }
}

The template

<mat-form-field>
    <input
        type="text"
        placeholder="Username"
        matInput
        formControlName="username"
        required/>
    <mat-hint align="end">Your username</mat-hint>
</mat-form-field>
<ng-template ngProjectAs="mat-error" bind-ngIf="usernameControl.invalid && (usernameControl.dirty || usernameControl.touched) && usernameControl.errors.reserved">
    <mat-error>Sorry, you can't use this username</mat-error>
</ng-template>
| improve this answer | |
  • this is exactly what im looking for, but where exactly do you do the http calls here? my main issue is every keypress is firing a backend-api call – MostafaItani Jun 12 '18 at 23:04
  • this.service.isUsernameReserved(username).subscribe(reserved => this.validated$.next(reserved)); the http call is within the service. – rkd Jun 24 '18 at 21:21

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