164

I have a simple component which calls a REST api every few seconds and receives back some JSON data. I can see from my log statements and the network traffic that the JSON data being returned is changing, and my model is being updated, however, the view isn't changing.

My component looks like:

import {Component, OnInit} from 'angular2/core';
import {RecentDetectionService} from '../services/recentdetection.service';
import {RecentDetection} from '../model/recentdetection';
import {Observable} from 'rxjs/Rx';

@Component({
    selector: 'recent-detections',
    templateUrl: '/app/components/recentdetection.template.html',
    providers: [RecentDetectionService]
})



export class RecentDetectionComponent implements OnInit {

    recentDetections: Array<RecentDetection>;

    constructor(private recentDetectionService: RecentDetectionService) {
        this.recentDetections = new Array<RecentDetection>();
    }

    getRecentDetections(): void {
        this.recentDetectionService.getJsonFromApi()
            .subscribe(recent => { this.recentDetections = recent;
             console.log(this.recentDetections[0].macAddress) });
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.getRecentDetections();
        let timer = Observable.timer(2000, 5000);
        timer.subscribe(() => this.getRecentDetections());
    }
}

And my view looks like:

<div class="panel panel-default">
    <!-- Default panel contents -->
    <div class="panel-heading"><h3>Recently detected</h3></div>
    <div class="panel-body">
        <p>Recently detected devices</p>
    </div>

    <!-- Table -->
    <table class="table" style="table-layout: fixed;  word-wrap: break-word;">
        <thead>
            <tr>
                <th>Id</th>
                <th>Vendor</th>
                <th>Time</th>
                <th>Mac</th>
            </tr>
        </thead>
        <tbody  >
            <tr *ngFor="#detected of recentDetections">
                <td>{{detected.broadcastId}}</td>
                <td>{{detected.vendor}}</td>
                <td>{{detected.timeStamp | date:'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss'}}</td>
                <td>{{detected.macAddress}}</td>
            </tr>
        </tbody>
    </table>
</div>

I can see from the results of console.log(this.recentDetections[0].macAddress) that the recentDetections object is being updated, but the table in the view never changes unless I reload the page.

I'm struggling to see what I'm doing wrong here. Can anyone help?

1

5 Answers 5

247

It might be that the code in your service somehow breaks out of Angular's zone. This breaks change detection. This should work:

import {Component, OnInit, NgZone} from 'angular2/core';

export class RecentDetectionComponent implements OnInit {

    recentDetections: Array<RecentDetection>;

    constructor(private zone:NgZone, // <== added
        private recentDetectionService: RecentDetectionService) {
        this.recentDetections = new Array<RecentDetection>();
    }

    getRecentDetections(): void {
        this.recentDetectionService.getJsonFromApi()
            .subscribe(recent => { 
                 this.zone.run(() => { // <== added
                     this.recentDetections = recent;
                     console.log(this.recentDetections[0].macAddress) 
                 });
        });
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.getRecentDetections();
        let timer = Observable.timer(2000, 5000);
        timer.subscribe(() => this.getRecentDetections());
    }
}

For other ways to invoke change detection see Triggering change detection manually in Angular

Alternative ways to invoke change detection are

ChangeDetectorRef.detectChanges()

to immediately run change detection for the current component and its children

ChangeDetectorRef.markForCheck()

to include the current component the next time Angular runs change detection

ApplicationRef.tick()

to run change detection for the whole application

21
  • 9
    Another alternative is to inject ChangeDetectorRef and call cdRef.detectChanges() instead of zone.run(). This could be more efficient, since it will not run change detection over the entire component tree like zone.run() does. Apr 28, 2016 at 15:47
  • 1
    Agree. Only use detectChanges() if any changes you make are local to the component and its descendants. My understanding is that detectChanges() will check the component and its descendants, but zone.run() and ApplicationRef.tick() will check the entire component tree. Apr 28, 2016 at 15:52
  • 2
    exactly what I was looking for.. using @Input() didn't make sense nor worked.
    – yorch
    Sep 15, 2016 at 1:50
  • 21
    I really don't understand why we need all this manual stuff or why angular2 gods left such necessary. Why doesn't @Input mean that component really really is dependent on whatever the parent component said that depended on in its changing data? It seems extremely inelegant that it doesn't just work. What am I missing?
    – user1969453
    Mar 31, 2017 at 21:17
  • 19
    Worked for me. But this is another example why I have the feeling angular framework developers are lost in the complexity of the angular framework. When using angular as an application developer you have to spent so much time to understand how angular does this or does that and how to workaround things like questioned above. Terrrible!!
    – Karl
    Jun 10, 2017 at 9:02
46

It is originally an answer in the comments from @Mark Rajcok, But I want to place it here as a tested and worked as a solution using ChangeDetectorRef , I see a good point here:

Another alternative is to inject ChangeDetectorRef and call cdRef.detectChanges() instead of zone.run(). This could be more efficient, since it will not run change detection over the entire component tree like zone.run() does. – Mark Rajcok

So code must be like:

import {Component, OnInit, ChangeDetectorRef} from 'angular2/core';

export class RecentDetectionComponent implements OnInit {

    recentDetections: Array<RecentDetection>;

    constructor(private cdRef: ChangeDetectorRef, // <== added
                private recentDetectionService: RecentDetectionService) {
        this.recentDetections = new Array<RecentDetection>();
    }

    getRecentDetections(): void {
        this.recentDetectionService.getJsonFromApi()
            .subscribe(recent => {
                this.recentDetections = recent;
                console.log(this.recentDetections[0].macAddress);
                this.cdRef.detectChanges(); // <== added
            });
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.getRecentDetections();
        let timer = Observable.timer(2000, 5000);
        timer.subscribe(() => this.getRecentDetections());
    }
} 

Edit: Using .detectChanges() inside subscibe could lead to issue Attempt to use a destroyed view: detectChanges

To solve it you need to unsubscribe before you destroy the component, so the full code will be like:

import {Component, OnInit, ChangeDetectorRef, OnDestroy} from 'angular2/core';

export class RecentDetectionComponent implements OnInit, OnDestroy {

    recentDetections: Array<RecentDetection>;
    private timerObserver: Subscription;

    constructor(private cdRef: ChangeDetectorRef, // <== added
                private recentDetectionService: RecentDetectionService) {
        this.recentDetections = new Array<RecentDetection>();
    }

    getRecentDetections(): void {
        this.recentDetectionService.getJsonFromApi()
            .subscribe(recent => {
                this.recentDetections = recent;
                console.log(this.recentDetections[0].macAddress);
                this.cdRef.detectChanges(); // <== added
            });
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.getRecentDetections();
        let timer = Observable.timer(2000, 5000);
        this.timerObserver = timer.subscribe(() => this.getRecentDetections());
    }

    ngOnDestroy() {
        this.timerObserver.unsubscribe();
    }

}
2
  • this.cdRef.detectChanges(); fixed my problem. Thank You!
    – mangesh
    Mar 12, 2019 at 11:18
  • Thanks for your suggestion but after multiple attempts of call I get error: failure:Error: ViewDestroyedError: Attempt to use a destroyed view: detectChanges For me zone.run() helps me come out of this error. Feb 4, 2020 at 13:38
6

I know this is an old question but I wanted to share my situation. I work on a team and someone set the change detection strategy to be onPush basically disabling automatic change detection. Not sure if this helps anyway else but just in case

@Component({
  selector: 'app-header',
  templateUrl: './header.component.html',
  styleUrls: ['./header.component.scss'],
  changeDetection: ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush
})

https://angular.io/api/core/ChangeDetectionStrategy

2

In my case, I had a very similar problem. I was updating my view inside a function that was being called by a parent component, and in my parent component I forgot to use @ViewChild(NameOfMyChieldComponent). I lost at least 3 hours just for this stupid mistake. i.e: I didn't need to use any of those methods:

  • ChangeDetectorRef.detectChanges()
  • ChangeDetectorRef.markForCheck()
  • ApplicationRef.tick()
2
  • 2
    can you explain how you got your child component updated with @ViewChild? thanks Feb 10, 2018 at 10:01
  • I suspect, parent was calling a method of a child class that wasn't rendered, and existed only in memory
    – glukki
    Apr 5, 2018 at 12:36
1

Instead of dealing with zones and change detection — let AsyncPipe handle complexity. This will put observable subscription, unsubscription (to prevent memory leaks) and changes detection on Angular shoulders.

Change your class to make an observable, that will emit results of new requests:

export class RecentDetectionComponent implements OnInit {

    recentDetections$: Observable<Array<RecentDetection>>;

    constructor(private recentDetectionService: RecentDetectionService) {
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.recentDetections$ = Observable.interval(5000)
            .exhaustMap(() => this.recentDetectionService.getJsonFromApi())
            .do(recent => console.log(recent[0].macAddress));
    }
}

And update your view to use AsyncPipe:

<tr *ngFor="let detected of recentDetections$ | async">
    ...
</tr>

Want to add, that it's better to make a service with a method that will take interval argument, and:

  • create new requests (by using exhaustMap like in code above);
  • handle requests errors;
  • stop browser from making new requests while offline.
0

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