I'm currently looking into doing more stuff with arrays, but I think the performance of those operations could be even better if we were allowed to somehow transmute into a Leaked<T> the array up front, only to un-leak it when the function ends. This would let us use leak amplification without a) introducing unsafety and b) setting up a catch_panic(_). Is this somehow possible in Rust?

For example, creating a generic array from an iterator (this obviously does not work):

#[inline]
fn map_inner<I, S, F, T, N>(list: I, f: F) -> GenericArray<T, N>
where I: IntoIterator<Item=S>, F: Fn(&S) -> T, N: ArrayLength<T> {
     unsafe {
        // pre-leak the whole array, it's uninitialized anyway
        let mut res : GenericArray<Leaked<T>, N> = std::mem::uninitialized();
        let i = list.into_iter();
        for r in res.iter_mut() {
            // this could panic anytime
            std::ptr::write(r, Leaked::new(f(i.next().unwrap())))
        }
        // transmuting un-leaks the array
        std::mem::transmute::<GenericArray<Leaked<T>, N>,
                              GenericArray<T, N>>(res)
    }
}

I should note that if we either had compile-time access to the size of T or a type that can hide its innards from borrowck (like Leaked<T> in the example), this is perfectly feasible.

  • What are the performance improving that you are expecting? Not incrementing len? – malbarbo Apr 28 '16 at 19:16
  • If I try to prevent leaking by catching panics (which only works on beta/nightly anyway for now), I get about 45% more throughput than collecting into a Vec. I presume I can get even better results by pre-leaking. – llogiq Apr 28 '16 at 19:51
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is possible using nodrop, but it could leak.

fn map_inner<I, S, F, T, N>(list: I, f: F) -> GenericArray<T, N>
where I: IntoIterator<Item=S>, F: Fn(&S) -> T, N: ArrayLength<T> {
     unsafe {
        // pre-leak the whole array, it's uninitialized anyway
        let mut res : NoDrop<GenericArray<T, N>> = NoDrop::new(std::mem::uninitialized());
        let i = list.into_iter();
        for r in res.iter_mut() {
            // this could panic anytime
            std::ptr::write(r, f(i.next().unwrap()))
        }
        res.into_inner()
    }
}

Let's suppose that after the first item (a) is consumed from i and written to r, a panic happens. The remaining items from i would be drop, but the item a would not. Although leaking memory is not considered unsafe, it is not desirable.

I think that the approach described in the question link is the way to go. It is similar to the Vec and ArrayVec implementations. I'm using a similar approach in array library that I'm writing.

  • Thank you! That is exactly what I was looking for. – llogiq Apr 28 '16 at 19:35
  • 1
    @llogiq If interest you, I wrote some code to answer other question that makes this kind of construct do not leak. See stackoverflow.com/questions/36925673/… – malbarbo Apr 29 '16 at 18:19
  • Thanks again – that's mostly equal to what I came up with. My benchmarks are very promising, too – very near to plain array construction. – llogiq Apr 29 '16 at 18:37

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.