1

I have a conditional statement that evaluates an .Any() LINQ query against my DB.

It is throwing an error when casting/converting a string to long value.

(long.TryParse(m.Reference,out t)? t : long.MaxValue)

The error is something like:

LINQ to Entities does not recognize the method '....' method, and this method cannot be translated into a store expression

Am I doing something wrong here? How can I achieve this?

using (var ctx = new DatabaseEntities())
{
    long t;
    if(!ctx.CustomerInboxes.Any(m=>m.CustomerId == customerId
        && m.Reference == item.ShoppingCartWebId.ToString() 
        && m.SubjectId == HerdbookConstants.PendingCartMessage 
        && item.ShoppingCartWebId > (long.TryParse(m.Reference,out t)? t : long.MaxValue)))
    )){
        // do something special
    }
}
  • did you try adding one condition at a time to rule out it is not problem with any of those 4 conditions? – techspider Apr 28 '16 at 18:26
  • 1
    yes, all custom convertions can't be translated to SQL – techspider Apr 28 '16 at 18:27
  • @AdrianoRepetti I cant evaluate as > or < as strings. – Mark Apr 28 '16 at 18:30
  • @Igor but this is not what I am trying to achieve. I need to determine if the m.Reference is greater or less than the item.ShoppingCartWebId. The m.Reference is stored a string(out of my control), even though in this scenario it is always of type long. – Mark Apr 28 '16 at 18:34
  • 3
    Even if it worked, wondering how m.Reference == item.ShoppingCartWebId.ToString() and item.ShoppingCartWebId > (long.TryParse(m.Reference,out t)? t : long.MaxValue) be true at the same time. – Ivan Stoev Apr 28 '16 at 18:38
1

According to your code you when m.Reference is not a valid number the condition should fail, this can be done using SqlFunctions.IsNumeric().

To compare numbers you can use string.Compare and simulate numeric comparison padding left with 0s (it's possible with SqlFunctions.Replicate()).

It's not too pretty, but should works:

var itemId = item.ShoppingCartWebId.ToString();

ctx.CustomerInboxes.Any(m => ...
                          && SqlFunctions.IsNumeric(m.Reference) != 0 
                          && string.Compare(SqlFunctions.Replicate("0", m.Reference.Length > itemId.Length ? m.Reference.Length - itemId.Length : 0) + itemId, m.Reference) > 0);

However you always can switch to Linq to Objects to check this specific part:

ctx.CustomerInboxes.Where(m => m.CustomerId == customerId &&
                               m.Reference == item.ShoppingCartWebId.ToString()  &&
                               m.SubjectId == HerdbookConstants.PendingCartMessage)
                    .AsEnumerable()
                    .Any(c => item.ShoppingCartWebId > (long.TryParse(c.Reference, out t) ? t : long.MaxValue))
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you @Arturo, the first example seems to be working. – Mark Apr 29 '16 at 14:13
1
using (var ctx = new DatabaseEntities())
{
    long t;
    if(!ctx.CustomerInboxes.ToList().Any(m=>m.CustomerId == customerId
        && m.Reference == item.ShoppingCartWebId.ToString() 
        && m.SubjectId == HerdbookConstants.PendingCartMessage 
        && item.ShoppingCartWebId > (long.TryParse(m.Reference,out t)? t : long.MaxValue)))
    ))
    {
        // do something special
    }
}

Just add .ToList(). While this will bring back your entire list to the client it will allow you to do the custom operators you want to do.

Based on the comments here is another alternative of bringing back a subset from the db then doing the custom parsing operator.

long t;
var initialQuery = ctx.CustomerInboxes.Where(x => m.CustomerId == customerId
    && m.Reference == item.ShoppingCartWebId.ToString()
    && m.SubjectId == HerdbookConstants.PendingCartMessage).ToList();

if (!initialQuery.Any(m => item.ShoppingCartWebId > (long.TryParse(m.Reference, out t) ? t : long.MaxValue)))
{
    // do something special
}
| improve this answer | |
  • this will get all CustomerInboxes read from database into memory. Think about millions of records in the DB... – trailmax Apr 28 '16 at 18:51
  • 2
    How is this a good answer, you don't even explain what you did different. Arbitrarily calling ToList() will have alot of negative effect for massive tables – johnny 5 Apr 28 '16 at 18:52
  • @trailmax While it will bring back all the records there are no requirements on performance etc etc. In addition, there is no indication that there is millions of records. – IdahoSixString Apr 28 '16 at 18:55
  • @johnny5 You are absolutely correct. However, the question does not state any requirements about performance, or the size of these arbitrary tables. Calling .ToList() will allow the user to achieve their goal by switching from Linq to Entities to Linq to Objects – IdahoSixString Apr 28 '16 at 18:55
  • 1
    @IdahoSixString , there are currently ~1million records and will grow. – Mark Apr 28 '16 at 18:57
0

One possible solution is to add a computed column in CustomerInboxes source table (I assumed it is a table, but it can be a view or a stored procedure), so that you do not have to make the ugly comparison that cannot be translated by LINQ2SQL:

ReferenceAsLong AS ISNULL(TRY_CONVERT(BIGINT, Reference), CAST(9223372036854775807 AS BIGINT)) PERSISTED 

You troubling LINQ condition is simplified and should work correctly:

item.ShoppingCartWebId > ReferenceAsLong
| improve this answer | |
0

you can try using Convert.ToInt64 instead of long.TryParse.

| improve this answer | |
0

This Query will look horrible. Ideally you should be switching this in the DB to be an int field.

(as long as there is no prepended 0s)
You can modify the logic so that if the length of ShoppingCartWebId is longer than the condition is met, alternatively if the length are equal a string compare should work fine

using (var ctx = new DatabaseEntities())
{
   long t;
  if(!ctx.CustomerInboxes.Any(m=>m.CustomerId == customerId
   && m.Reference == item.ShoppingCartWebId.ToString() 
   && m.SubjectId == HerdbookConstants.PendingCartMessage 
   && (item.ShoppingCartWebId.length > SqlFunctions.StringConvert((long).Reference) 
   || (item.ShoppingCartWebId.length == SqlFunctions.StringConvert((long).Reference
       && item.ShoppingCartWebId > SqlFunctions.StringConvert((long)m.Reference)
 ))){
     //do something special
   }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

A combination of a length check with string.Compare should do the trick.

Logic

  • if item.Reference.Length is greater in length it is also a larger number.
  • If they are the same length then execute a string.Compare which evals from left to right which also works great for numbers.

string.Compare(string a, string b). This returns:

  • 1 if a is bigger than b
  • 0 if a equals b
  • -1 if b is bigger than a

Code:

using (var ctx = new DatabaseEntities())
{
    var webId = item.ShoppingCartWebId.ToString();
    var webIdLength = webId.Length;

    if (!ctx.CustomerInboxes.Any(m => m.CustomerId == customerId
        && m.Reference == item.ShoppingCartWebId.ToString()
        && m.SubjectId == HerdbookConstants.PendingCartMessage
        && (m.Reference.Length > webIdLength || (m.Reference.Length == webIdLength && string.Compare(m.Reference, webId) > 0))))) {
            //do something special
        }
}

Benefit

Indexes! Because there is no padding involved here the actual comparison check can still benefit from using any indexes on this column. If your data grows it should not impact performance too much. Unfortunately the length comparison will not utilize any indexes I believe but the comparison but this will probably have a smaller impact on performance than other parts of the query

Assumptions

  • There are no formatting characters like , or .
  • There are no instances where strings are padded with 0 or spaces
  • You are always comparing whole numbers (no fractions)
| improve this answer | |

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