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I want to use Typeconverter to convert list of string to create a dropdown in propertyGrid.

For example I have Class (MyClass) contain property MyName contain a list names, I want to use typeconverter with the List names property show as drop down list and not a collection in propertyGrid

Any idea, I'm new with TypeConverter

public class MyClass 
{
   List<string> myNames = {jack, pam , phil, suzan};
   public List<string> Names 
   {
       get {return myNames;}
   }
}

public class TestClass 
{
    MyClass myClass = new MyClass();

    propertygrid1.SelectedObject = myClass;
}

Thanks

  • 1
    I might be wrong, but. I think you have to have the enum predefined in you source, I don't think you can read in a set of strings and dynamically create an enum from them. // If it is predefined then you can just use Enum.TryParse. – KDecker Apr 28 '16 at 18:31
  • Why not just use enum.tryparse? Oh, you want to dynamically create the enum? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Jim W Apr 28 '16 at 18:32
  • You dont need to create an enum, override GetStandardValuesSupported, GetStandardValuesExclusive and GetStandardValues it will display the values in a dropdown. the enum makes this an XY question – Ňɏssa Pøngjǣrdenlarp Apr 28 '16 at 18:37
  • yes I want dynamically create the enum – J-P Apr 28 '16 at 18:38
  • 1
    If you have a property that contain the List names, it is a collection and there is no reason to show it any other way. If you really want some property to be only from that list, use the StandardValues approach. – Ňɏssa Pøngjǣrdenlarp Apr 28 '16 at 18:46
1

If I understand well, you want to use a list of string dynamically created to define the value of a string.

Here is the class I use:

public class MyClass
{
    private List<string> myNames;

    public MyClass()
    {
        myNames = new List<string> { "jack", "pam", "phil", "suzan" };
    }

    [Browsable(false)]
    public List<string> Names
    {
        get { return myNames; }
    }

    [TypeConverter(typeof(MyConverter))]
    public string SelectedName { get; set; }
}

And here is the type converter:

public class MyConverter : TypeConverter
{
    public override bool GetStandardValuesSupported(ITypeDescriptorContext context)
    {
        return true;
    }

    public override StandardValuesCollection GetStandardValues(ITypeDescriptorContext context)
    {
        // you need to get the list of values from somewhere
        // in this sample, I get it from the MyClass itself
        var myClass = context.Instance as MyClass;
        if (myClass != null)
            return new StandardValuesCollection(myClass.Names);

        return base.GetStandardValues(context);
    }
}

As you see, a converter has access to the property grid context to get the values from somewhere. This is what's displayed in this case:

enter image description here

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