3

Straight to the problem:

This code,

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    std::string string = "9 9";
    std::cout << string;
    return 0;
}

returns 9 9 as output.

Yet, when inputting 9 9 to this code,

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    std::string string;
    std::cin >> string;
    std::cout << string;
    return 0;
}

it outputs 9. Why does this happen?

I guess it has to do with the space, but is there any way to avoid this? I must say space is the only valid separation between numbers.

7

std::cin takes one word at a time. To take the whole line you would need to use getline() function.

Usage: std::getline (std::cin,name);

Your case: This should work when you include <string>:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main() {
    std::string MyString;
    std::getline (std::cin, MyString);
    std::cout << MyString;
    return 0;
}

Advice: Don't you ever use using namespace std; anymore. Also, use proper variable names.

  • 5
    operator>>(std::istream&, std::string&) reads one word at a time. What std::cin reads depends upon what function you pass it to. – Benjamin Lindley Apr 29 '16 at 1:11
  • 2
    @ben very useful comment – Khalil Khalaf Apr 29 '16 at 1:16
  • In simpler terms: std::cin does not read "one word at a time". It is just a stream object representing the standard input stream. You could very well read all characters available from std::cin, including spaces, until, e.g., an eof is detected. – Snps Apr 29 '16 at 1:52
  • @FirstStep why should you not use "using namespace std" if that is the only name space you are using, why is it bad? That's kinda a big claim for me, I could see that being an issue in a template since you don't know how it will be used. But in main that is a problem? – Caperneoignis Apr 30 '16 at 20:52
  • @cam it is completely fine to use here and/or for simple programs and many programmers are using it in big programs but it is just a good practice to know how, why and when to use it. here is a reference: stackoverflow.com/questions/1452721/… – Khalil Khalaf Apr 30 '16 at 23:26
3

The standard library overload of the input operator >> taking an std::istream and a std::string as parameters, is designed to read characters from the stream into the std::string object until a delimiter i found, and then return the altered stream (for further reads).

All whitespace characters are by default recognized as delimiters, e.g. in most implementations, , \t, and \n (the true meaning of whitespace is defined by the locale's ctype facet).

The purpose of this design is for the usage of the input operator as a tokenizer of input data, e.g.:

std::istringstream input_stream{"apple banana pear"};

std::string token;
while (input_stream >> token) {
    // Token per iteration is: "apple", "banana", and "pear".
}

Here input_stream >> token is equivalent to the call std::operator>>(input_stream, token) which will read characters up until a delimiter into token, and then return the stream object input_stream. The returned stream object is finally checked as a bool in the while clause, which basically returns !input_stream.fail() (see std::basic_ios::operator bool).

If what you need is to read characters until a linebreak or end-of-file is detected then use std::getline.

If you want to read N characters from the stream then use, e.g., std::basic_istream::read.


Reference:

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/operator_ltltgtgt

  • It reads until whitespace (ignoring EOF and width), where "whitespace" is defined by the locale's ctype facet. – T.C. Apr 29 '16 at 1:50
1

std::cin is an extraction stream object whose extraction behavior is dependent on the >> operator overload used. (Thanks Ben)

For C-style strings, std::string and its variants; it's operator overload only extracts one "word" (non-delimited sequence of characters) at a time.

To get an entire line of characters, you would use std::getline

Note: The default delimiters is dependent on your default locale, for en_us.utf8 it includes but not limited to, any whitespace(" "), tab("\t"), and newline("\n") encountered

  • 2
    Not sure what a "formatted extraction stream object" is, but the behavior is a characteristic of the operator function. It is not specific to the object. – Benjamin Lindley Apr 29 '16 at 1:20
  • @BenjaminLindley, True... modified, Thanks – WhiZTiM Apr 29 '16 at 1:25
0

Why does this happen? I guess it has to do with the space, but is there any way to avoid this? I must say space is the only valid separation between numbers.

The input operators ignore whitespace by default ( blank, tab, newline, formfeed and carriage return)!

You can use std::getline to read until newline (by default):

std::getline(std::cin, string);
0

after writing using name space std : don't use std::cin somrthing like this.

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