8

I am trying to count "characters" in go. That is, if a string contains one printable "glyph", or "composed character" (or what someone would ordinarily think of as a character), I want it to count 1. For example, the string "Hello, 世🖖🏿🖖界", should count 11, since there are 11 characters, and a human would look at this and say there are 11 glyphs.

utf8.RuneCountInString() works well in most cases, including ascii, accents, asian characters and even emojis. However, as I understand it runes correspond to code points, not characters. When I try to use basic emojis it works, but when I use emojis that have different skin tones, I get the wrong count: https://play.golang.org/p/aFIGsB6MsO

From what I read here and here the following should work, but I still don't seem to be getting the right results (it over-counts):

func CountCharactersInString(str string) int {
    var ia norm.Iter
    ia.InitString(norm.NFC, str)
    nc := 0
    for !ia.Done() {
        nc = nc + 1
        ia.Next()
    }
    return nc
}

This doesn't work either:

func GraphemeCountInString(str string) int {
    re := regexp.MustCompile("\\PM\\pM*|.")
    return len(re.FindAllString(str, -1))
}

I am looking for something similar to this in Objective C:

+ (NSInteger)countCharactersInString:(NSString *) string {
    // --- Calculate the number of characters enterd by user and update character count label
    NSInteger count = 0;
    NSUInteger index = 0;
    while (index < string.length) {
        NSRange range = [string rangeOfComposedCharacterSequenceAtIndex:index];
        count++;
        index += range.length;
    }
    return count;
 }
  • You're looking for an implementation of the "Grapheme Cluster Boundary" algorithm from UAX #29. – 一二三 Apr 30 '16 at 0:37
  • I believe that's right. I tried both implementations for grapheme counting from this answer stackoverflow.com/a/26728555/547291, but I run into the same trouble, but perhaps grapheme cluster boundary counting is more what I want? – Bjorn Roche May 2 '16 at 16:22
  • The answers to that question confuse "grapheme clusters" with "character normalisation" (all have serious errors in them). – 一二三 May 3 '16 at 0:47
  • Were you able to find a solution to this? The problem is the skin-tone modifier is being counted as a separate character and norm does not "count" it as 1 character with the hand. – F21 Jan 25 '18 at 4:16
  • Never found a correct solution, so I had to loosen my requirements. – Bjorn Roche Jan 25 '18 at 15:01
4

I wrote a package that allows you to do this: https://github.com/rivo/uniseg. It breaks strings according to the rules specified in Unicode Standard Annex #29 which is what you are looking for. Here is how you would use it in your case:

package main

import (
    "fmt"

    "github.com/rivo/uniseg"
)

func main() {
    fmt.Println(uniseg.GraphemeClusterCount("Hello, 世🖖🏿🖖界"))
}

This will print 11 as you expect.

4

Have you tried strings.Count?

package main

import (
     "fmt"
     "strings"
 )

 func main() {
     fmt.Println(strings.Count("Hello, 世🖖🖖界", "🖖")) // Returns 2
 }
  • In the example "Hello, 世🖖🖖界", I would want it to count 11, since there are 11 characters, not 2. I will edit my question to clarify. – Bjorn Roche Apr 29 '16 at 14:03
3

Reference to the example of API document. https://golang.org/pkg/unicode/utf8/#example_DecodeLastRuneInString

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "unicode/utf8"
)

func main() {
    str := "Hello, 世🖖界"
    count := 0
    for len(str) > 0 {
        r, size := utf8.DecodeLastRuneInString(str)
        count++
        fmt.Printf("%c %v\n", r, size)

        str = str[:len(str)-size]
    }
    fmt.Println("count:",count)
}
  • 1
    That counts runes, not graphemes: str := "🇦🇽" counts 2 instead of 1. – 一二三 Apr 29 '16 at 6:42
  • what "AX" is and why it should be 1? – Jiang YD Apr 29 '16 at 6:47
  • 1
    It's U+1F1E6 U+1F1FD, which should render as the flag of the Åland Islands. Any other regional indicator symbol will have the same result (perhaps 🇫🇷 renders better on your system?). – 一二三 Apr 29 '16 at 7:40
  • but U+1F1E6 and U+1F1FD can be two separate characters too, am I right? – Jiang YD Apr 29 '16 at 8:28
  • 1
    Yes, but in a regional indicator sequence they form one grapheme (or "one printable 'glyph'" as the original question put it). – 一二三 Apr 29 '16 at 8:42

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