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My assignment is to search through the binary representation of a number and replace a matched pattern of another binary representation of a number. If I get a match, I convert the matching bits from the first integer into zeroes and move on. For example the number 469 would be 111010101 and I have to match it with 5 (101). Here's the program I've written so far. Doesn't work as expected.

using System;

namespace Conductors
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            //this is the number I'm searching for a match in
            int binaryTicket = 469;
            //This is the pattern I'm trying to match (101)
            int binaryPerforator = 5;

            string binaryTicket01 = Convert.ToString(binaryTicket, 2);

            bool match = true;
            //in a 32 bit integer, position 29 is the last one I would 
            //search in, since I'm searching for the next 3
            for (int pos = 0; pos < 29; pos++)
            {
                for (int j = 0; j <= 3; j++)
                {
                    var posInBinaryTicket = pos + j;
                    var posInPerforator = j;

                    int bitInBinaryTicket = (binaryTicket & (1 << posInBinaryTicket)) >> posInBinaryTicket;
                    int bitInPerforator = (binaryPerforator & (1 << posInPerforator)) >> posInPerforator;

                    if (bitInBinaryTicket != bitInPerforator)
                    {
                        match = false;
                        break;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        //what would be the proper bitwise operator here?
                        bitInBinaryTicket = 0;
                    }
                }

                Console.WriteLine(binaryTicket01);
            }
        }
    }
}
  • I would suggest this be posted @ codereview.stackexchange.com instead of SO. Complete code that doesn't work as you expect it is better reviewed there. – Mikanikal Apr 29 '16 at 4:27
  • @Mikanikal CodeReview is for complete code that does work, but needs feedback for better/cleaner solutions. It would be closed if OP posted it on codereview. SO is the correct site for this question. However, it's currently unclear as 'not working as expected' can mean a million different things. – Rob Apr 29 '16 at 4:28
  • @Rob That was my intention if it did not sound (read) as such. Code that is working, but not as expected, meaning that he needs a better solution. So with a more clear question from the OP, I guess I will retract my comment. – Mikanikal Apr 29 '16 at 4:35
  • @Rob The console outputs 29 times 111010101, even though this CW is outside of the loop. The bits aren't replaced either -111010*101* and 11*101*0101. The end result should be 110000000 – Svetan Dimoff Apr 29 '16 at 4:44
  • @TsvetanDimoff You never change binaryTicket01 – Rob Apr 29 '16 at 4:52
2

Few things:

  1. Use uint for this. Makes things a hell of a lot easier when dealing with binary numbers.
  2. You aren't really setting anything - you're simply storing information, which is why you're printing out the same number so often.
  3. You should loop the x times where x = length of the binary string (not just 29). There's no need for inner loops

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    //this is the number I'm searching for a match in
    uint binaryTicket = 469;
    //This is the pattern I'm trying to match (101)
    uint binaryPerforator = 5;

    var numBinaryDigits = Math.Ceiling(Math.Log(binaryTicket, 2));
    for (var i = 0; i < numBinaryDigits; i++)
    {
        var perforatorShifted = binaryPerforator << i;

        //We need to mask off the result (otherwise we fail for checking 101 -> 111)
        //The mask will put 1s in each place the perforator is checking.
        var perforDigits = (int)Math.Ceiling(Math.Log(perforatorShifted, 2));
        uint mask = (uint)Math.Pow(2, perforDigits) - 1;

        Console.WriteLine("Ticket:\t" + GetBinary(binaryTicket));
        Console.WriteLine("Perfor:\t" + GetBinary(perforatorShifted));
        Console.WriteLine("Mask :\t" + GetBinary(mask));

        if ((binaryTicket & mask) == perforatorShifted)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Match.");
            //Imagine we have the case:

            //Ticket:
            //111010101
            //Perforator:
            //000000101

            //Is a match. What binary operation can we do to 0-out the final 101?
            //We need to AND it with 
            //111111010

            //To get that value, we need to invert the perforatorShifted
            //000000101
            //XOR
            //111111111
            //EQUALS
            //111111010

            //Which would yield:
            //111010101
            //AND
            //111110000
            //Equals
            //111010000

            var flipped = perforatorShifted ^ ((uint)0xFFFFFFFF);
            binaryTicket = binaryTicket & flipped;
        }
    }

    string binaryTicket01 = Convert.ToString(binaryTicket, 2);
    Console.WriteLine(binaryTicket01);
}

static string GetBinary(uint v)
{
    return Convert.ToString(v, 2).PadLeft(32, '0');
}

Please read over the above code - if there's anything you don't understand, leave me a comment and I can run through it with you.

  • Solution works. Thank you so much! I still haven't wrapped my head around it. I might take advantage of your offer at some point. I really appreciate it. – Svetan Dimoff Apr 29 '16 at 5:23
  • @TsvetanDimoff No worries. I've updated it with a bit of debugging code, so hopefully you can see how the shifting works and the binary numbers we're working with – Rob Apr 29 '16 at 5:28
  • @Rob, I guess you meant uint instead of unit. I was wondering what you were talking about, LOL. – Andrew Apr 30 '16 at 1:40
  • @Andrew Yep :) Thanks - I've fixed it now – Rob Apr 30 '16 at 3:12

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