2

I have the following:

data_spec['data'] = "some.awesome.values"

data_path = ""
data_spec['data'].split('.').each do |level|
  data_path = "#{data_path}['#{level}']"
end

data = "site.data#{data_path}"

At this point, data equals a string: "site.data['some']['awesome']['values']"

What I need help with is using the string to get the value of: site.data['some']['awesome']['values']

site.data has the following value:

{  
    "some" => {  
        "awesome" => {  
            "values" => [  
                {  
                    "things" => "Stuff",
                    "stuff" => "Things",
                },
                {  
                    "more_things" => "More Stuff",
                    "more_stuff" => "More Things",
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

2
  • You could use an eval, but that's not really a good way to go about it. Is your actual problem to return value site.data['some']['awesome']['values'] given the input string "some.awesome.values" ? – Neil Slater Apr 29 '16 at 15:06
  • I'm not sure I fully understand, I'm very new to Ruby. The data_spec['data'] is being pulled from a YAML file. – Kyle Brumm Apr 29 '16 at 15:16
4

You could do as tadman suggested and use site.data.dig('some', 'awesome', values') if you are using ruby 2.3.0 (which is awesome and I didn't even know existed). This is probably your best choice. But if you really want to write the code yourself read below.

You were on the right track, the best way to do this is:

data_spec['data'] = "some.awesome.values"

data = nil
data_spec['data'].split('.').each do |level|
  if data.nil?
    data = site.data[level]
  else
    data = data[level]
  end
end

To understand why this works first you need to understand that site.data['some']['awesome']['values'] is the same as saying: first get some then inside that get awesome then inside that get values. So our first step is retrieving the some. Since we don't have that first level yet we get it from site.data and save it to a variable data. Once we have that we just get each level after that from data and save it to data, allowing us to get deeper and deeper into the hash.

So using your example data would initally look like this:

        {"awesome" => {  
            "values" => [  
                {  
                    "things" => "Stuff",
                    "stuff" => "Things",
                },
                {  
                    "more_things" => "More Stuff",
                    "more_stuff" => "More Things",
                }
            ]
        }
    }

Then this:

        {"values" => [  
            {  
                "things" => "Stuff",
                "stuff" => "Things",
            },
            {  
                "more_things" => "More Stuff",
                "more_stuff" => "More Things",
            }
        ]
    }

and finally output like this:

        [  
            {  
                "things" => "Stuff",
                "stuff" => "Things",
            },
            {  
                "more_things" => "More Stuff",
                "more_stuff" => "More Things",
            }
        ]
7
  • This is on the right track. If the original string format of x['y']['z'] needs to be handled, that will require a regular expression of some sort presumably. – tadman Apr 29 '16 at 15:33
  • I don't think one is needed as long as OP plans to use the format of 'foo.bar.foobar' and splits on . – Mo H. Apr 29 '16 at 15:34
  • This solution works for a single level "some". I am getting an error.Error: no implicit conversion of String into Integer when I try to use "some.awesome" – Kyle Brumm Apr 29 '16 at 15:36
  • 1
    @KyleBrumm It sounds like you're hitting an array. Is some an array or a hash? (does it have [] or {}) – Mo H. Apr 29 '16 at 15:43
  • I believe it is a hash. Sorry, I'm very new to Ruby. – Kyle Brumm Apr 29 '16 at 15:45
4

If you're receiving a string like 'x.y.z' and need to navigate a nested hash, Ruby 2.3.0 includes the dig method:

spec = "some.awesome.values"

data = {  
  "some" => {  
    "awesome" => {  
        "values" => [
          'a','b','c'
        ]
    }
  }
}

data.dig(*spec.split('.'))
# => ["a", "b", "c"]

If you don't have Ruby 2.3.0 and upgrading isn't an option you can just patch it in for now:

class Hash
  def dig(*path)
    path.inject(self) do |location, key|
      location.respond_to?(:keys) ? location[key] : nil
    end
  end
end
0

I wrote something that does exactly this. Feel free to take any information of value from it or steal it! :)

https://github.com/keithrbennett/trick_bag/blob/master/lib/trick_bag/collections/collection_access.rb

Check out the unit tests to see how to use it:

https://github.com/keithrbennett/trick_bag/blob/master/spec/trick_bag/collections/collection_access_spec.rb

There's an accessor method that returns a lambda. Since lambdas can be called using the [] operator (method, really), you can get such a lambda and access arbitrary numbers of levels:

accessor['hostname.ip_addresses.0']

or, in your case:

require 'trick_bag'
accessor = TrickBag::CollectionsAccess.accessor(site.data)
do_something_with(accessor['some.awesome.values'])
-2

What you are looking for is something generally looked down upon and for good reasons. But here you go - it's called eval:

binding.eval data
14
  • 2
    This is complete over-kill and is a broken solution you should be ashamed to suggest. There's a reason this is looked down on. – tadman Apr 29 '16 at 15:31
  • 1
    @tadman reading between the lines is not answering a different question just because you don't like the actual answer. – ndnenkov Apr 29 '16 at 15:39
  • 1
    @ndn, i think it is really very obvious and danger solution. You should not advice it – Ilya Apr 29 '16 at 15:42
  • 1
    @tadman seriously, read the title even. It asks for eval in the most straight forward easy possible. – ndnenkov Apr 29 '16 at 15:42
  • 4
    You're suggesting something that would be an automatic fail in any code review I'd ever do and I'm not alone here. This is a completely inappropriate use of eval. I don't know why you're fighting so hard here. Casual use of eval in situations like this is why CERT advisories are issued. Ruby had a few of these related to the YAML and XML parser modules which executed arbitrary code for reasons nobody could explain. Don't even go down this road to start with. – tadman Apr 29 '16 at 15:43

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