-2

I noticed the following notation for defining an extension method. This kind of syntax must be new since it is not recognized in Visual Studio 2013 but only in VS2015

public static IEnumerable<MemberInfo> GetMembersInAssembly(
        this Assembly asm, string memberName) =>
            from type in asm.GetTypes()
            from ms in type.GetMember(memberName, MemberTypes.All,
                BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic |
                BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Instance)
            select ms;

I believe that the equivalent class syntax would be

public static IEnumerable<MemberInfo> GetMembersInAssembly1(
 this Assembly asm, string memberName) {
 return from type in asm.GetTypes()
 from ms in type.GetMember(memberName, MemberTypes.All,
 BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic |
 BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Instance)
 select ms;
}

I would like to ask what are the semantics of this new syntax?

  • msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dn802602.aspx look for expression-bodied – Arturo Menchaca Apr 29 '16 at 16:10
  • why did someone vote to close this? they checked "off topic , not about programming ? " – Scott Selby Apr 29 '16 at 16:13
  • @ScottSelby: I voted to close as off-topic for asking for a tutorial or off-site resource. Arturo's comment pretty much validates my reason (an MSDN article exists). I understand it sort of teeters on being on-topic. – Cᴏʀʏ Apr 29 '16 at 16:16
  • 1
    @Ryios FYI, Code Review's purpose is not to provide resources, it is to review real, working code for improvements. – Phrancis Apr 29 '16 at 16:24
  • 2
    I'm voting to close this question, because there is no question. – Mathieu Guindon Apr 29 '16 at 16:27
2

I believe that the equivalent class syntax would be

Yes, it's the same, this is a new feature in C# 6.0 called Expression-Bodied, is a syntactic sugar that allows define methods and properties where the body is defined by the given expression.

For example:

public string Property 
{
    get 
    {
        return "some value";
    }
}

public void PrintLine(string line)
{
    Console.WriteLine(line);
}

Can be written like:

public string Property => "some value";

public void PrintLine(string line) => Console.WriteLine(line);
-2

I think your equivalent class isn't right. That kind of syntax is LINQ query. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb397676.aspx

  • 2
    no - OP obivously knows what LINQ is , and was asking for specifically extension methods with LINQ function in the definition – Scott Selby Apr 29 '16 at 16:20

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