3

I'm attempting to create a multiscript tool, that will take an argument of a .sql file and execute it.

I've set up a simple test, just executing on one database, however the syntax is giving me issues every time.

DELIMITER $$
CREATE DEFINER=`a_user`@`%` PROCEDURE `a_procedure`(
    IN DirectEmployeeID TEXT,
    IN StartRange DATE,
    IN EndRange DATE
)
BEGIN
SELECT aColumn
WHERE thisThing = 1;
END$$
DELIMITER ;

To be clear, this script has been tested, and works when passed like :

mysql -uuser -p -hhost -Pport databaseName < file.sql

and also works through mysql workbench.

I saw this type of solution on another site:

with conn.cursor() as cursor:
    f = sys.argv[1]
    file = open(f, 'r')
    sql = " ".join(file.readlines())
    cursor.execute(sql)

which gives me a MySQL syntax error:

pymysql.err.ProgrammingError: (1064, u"You have an error in your SQL syntax; 
check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right 
syntax to use near 'DELIMITER $$\n CREATE DEFINER=`a_user`@`%` PROCEDURE 
`MyCommissionsDirect`(\n \tIN ' at line 1")

as you can see, there are newline characters within the script that mysql isn't liking.

I then tried this:

with conn.cursor() as cursor:
    f = sys.argv[1]
    file = open(f, 'r')
    sql = ''
    line = file.readline()
    while line:
        sql += ' ' + line.strip('\n').strip('\t')
        line = file.readline()
    print sql
    cursor.execute(sql)

and get another syntax issue, the print shows that this is all one line, which is not working in mysqlworkbench. doesn't even try to execute it, which is strange.

When I put the DELIMETER $$ on a separate line first, it executes in mysqlworkbench.

This is one of those situations where I feel like I may be making this more and more complicated. I'm very surprised pymysql doesn't have a way of simply executing a sql file directly. I'm weary of trying to do string manipulation and get this working for this particular file, because then the dream of making this tool ambiguous and reusable kind of goes out the door.

Am I going about this in the complete incorrect way?

Thanks!

2

Here is my solution for using an SQL file with PyMySQL. The files contain many requests ended by ; which is used to split requests in a list. So beware of the missing ; in the list.

I decided to add the missing ; not in the function to spar a for loop. Maybe there is a better way.

create-db-loff.sql :

DROP DATABASE IF EXISTS loff;
CREATE DATABASE loff CHARACTER SET 'utf8';
USE loff;

CREATE TABLE product(
    `id` INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    `code` BIGINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL UNIQUE,
    `name` VARCHAR(200),
    `nutrition_grades` VARCHAR(1)
);

CREATE TABLE category(
    `id`INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    `name` VARCHAR(200)
);

CREATE TABLE asso_prod_cat(
    `category_id` INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    `product_id` INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT `fk_asso_prod_cat_category`
        FOREIGN KEY(category_id)
        REFERENCES category(id)
        ON DELETE CASCADE,
    CONSTRAINT `fk_asso_prod_cat_product`
        FOREIGN KEY(product_id)
        REFERENCES product(id)
        ON DELETE CASCADE
);

db.py :

DB_CONFIG = {
    'host': 'localhost',
    'user': 'loff',
    'pass': 'loff',
    'db': 'loff',
    'char': 'utf8',
    'file': 'create-db-loff.sql'
}

def get_sql_from_file(filename=DB_CONFIG['file']):
    """
    Get the SQL instruction from a file

    :return: a list of each SQL query whithout the trailing ";"
    """
    from os import path

    # File did not exists
    if path.isfile(filename) is False:
        print("File load error : {}".format(filename))
        return False

    else:
        with open(filename, "r") as sql_file:
            # Split file in list
            ret = sql_file.read().split(';')
            # drop last empty entry
            ret.pop()
            return ret

request_list = self.get_sql_from_file()

if request_list is not False:

    for idx, sql_request in enumerate(request_list):
        self.message = self.MSG['request'].format(idx, sql_request)
        cursor.execute(sql_request + ';')
1

DELIMITER is command used by a MySQL interpreter, such as the command line or Workbench, and not an actual MySQL command.

I ended up working in some logic in my Python application to disable execution of MySQL queries when DELIMITER has been defined, then to execute when DELIMITER has been defined again:

import MySQLdb
import re

file = 'somesql.sql'
conn = MySQLdb.Connection(mysqlserver, mysqluser, mysqlpass, mysqldb)
curs = conn.cursor()
ignorestatement = False # by default each time we get a ';' that's our cue to execute.
statement = ""
for line in open(file):
    if line.startswith('DELIMITER'):
        if not ignorestatement:
            ignorestatement = True # disable executing when we get a ';'
            continue
        else:
            ignorestatement = False # re-enable execution of sql queries on ';'
            line = " ;" # Rewrite the DELIMITER command to allow the block of sql to execute
    if re.match(r'--', line):  # ignore sql comment lines
        continue
    if not re.search(r'[^-;]+;', line) or ignorestatement:  # keep appending lines that don't end in ';' or DELIMITER has been called
        statement = statement + line
    else:  # when you get a line ending in ';' then exec statement and reset for next statement providing the DELIMITER hasn't been set
        statement = statement + line
        # print "\n\n[DEBUG] Executing SQL statement:\n%s" % (statement)
        try:
            curs.execute(statement)
            conn.commit()
            statement = ""
        except curs.Error, e:
            print(file + " - Error applying (" + str(e) + ")\nTerminating.")
            sys.exit(1)

It's a bit hacky, but seems to work well enough.

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