1

Suppose we want to insert value smaller. It will go to Node (insert x left, k, right) I don't understand how we can have insert x left when function insert is declared as taking only one argument, the key. How can left also be passed to insert funtion?

type 'a bst_t =  
| Leaf
| Node of 'a bst_t * 'a * 'a bst_t

let rec insert x = function  
  | Leaf -> Node (Leaf, x, Leaf) 
  | Node (left, k, right) ->
    if x < k then Node (insert x left, k, right) 
    else Node (left, k, insert x right) 
1

Ocaml has a REPL, i.e. an interactive environment useful for experimenting and having a conversation with ocaml.

$ ocaml
        OCaml version 4.02.3

# type 'a bst_t =
| Leaf
| Node of 'a bst_t * 'a * 'a bst_t    ;;
type 'a bst_t = Leaf | Node of 'a bst_t * 'a * 'a bst_t
# let rec insert x = function
  | Leaf -> Node (Leaf, x, Leaf)
  | Node (left, k, right) ->
    if x < k then Node (insert x left, k, right)
    else Node (left, k, insert x right)         ;;
val insert : 'a -> 'a bst_t -> 'a bst_t = <fun>

The read-eval-print-loop shows not only the value of the evaluated expression but also its type. Here, you can see that the symbol insert is bound to a function which takes a value of "some type 'a" and returns another function that takes a value of "a binary tree of that type 'a" and returns a value of the same binary tree of 'a type.

I strongly recommend to use REPLs whenever you have them, as they tell you a lot about the system.

  • I'd recommend using utop as a REPL. It's easy to install with the help of OPAM: opam install utop. Or at least wrap ocaml into something like rlwrap or ledit (more details and tips can be found here). – Anton Trunov Apr 30 '16 at 15:40
0

Although it might seem so at first sight, function insert has not one but two arguments - one is the key to be inserted as you said, and the second one is the bst_t in which you want to insert the key.

In OCaml, the concept of Point-free programming is highly recommended when it's possible to apply it, and that's precisely what happens with your insert function. Your version of the function is just a short-hand notation for the following function (written in normal, verbose syntax):

let rec insert x bst = match bst with 
| Leaf -> Node (Leaf, x, Leaf) 
| Node (left, k, right) ->
  if x < k then Node (insert x left, k, right) 
  else Node (left, k, insert x right) 

where bst is the tree on which the insertion is performed, i.e. the tree that the function matches the Leaf | Node patterns against.

0

The function keyword defines a function as a series of patterns, and is almost always used without giving the parameter a name as such. So the insert function actually has two parameters.

This definition without function is equivalent:

let rec insert x node =
  match node with
  | Leaf -> Node (Leaf, x, Leaf) 
  | Node (left, k, right) ->
    if x < k then Node (insert x left, k, right) 
    else Node (left, k, insert x right) 
  • Does that mean i could actually pass it an arbitrary number of arguments? – power_output Apr 29 '16 at 22:07
  • 1
    No, the function takes two arguments exactly. (Look at the equivalent form, the arguments are explicit.) – Jeffrey Scofield Apr 29 '16 at 22:10
  • without naming the parameter - maybe you want to make it easier for a beginner, but this hurts. I would say "naming the single parameter or start pattern matching on it" if I do not want to talk about pattern matching left of the equal sign. – Str. May 1 '16 at 17:26
  • I see what you're saying. You can name the parameter with function, but it's not commonly useful to do this. Also, you don't have to name the parameter with fun, you can use a pattern. Something to explain to beginning programmers later on, I think. I can add the word "commonly" to the description. – Jeffrey Scofield May 1 '16 at 17:31

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