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I'm parsing some data which can have duplicates. To get rid of them, I use a small list with the last five non-duplicate items and check if the current item is not in the list. I have a solution that works, but there should be a better way. Any ideas?

My current code to achieve this:

activities = []
index = 0

# Open file
# Loop lines (each line is an activity)
# Parse line to activity object

if activity not in activities:
    # session is part of SQLAlchemy but this isn't that important
    self.session.add(activity)

# The part from here on is the one I want changed
if len(activities) == 5:
    activities.pop(index)

activities.insert(index, activity)

if index == 4:
    index = 0
else:
    index = index + 1

EDIT: The problem is not in removing the duplicates inside this list. This is just to check if the new activity is in one of the last added activities. I'm parsing A LOT of data and checking the new activity against all old ones would be a huge bottleneck. The data is sorted by date and can really have a duplicate just in the last few activities (so I'm checking the last 5). Getting the unique values is not the problem, I'm just asking for a solution that does the same thing as mine already does, but would be better.

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  • Are you keeping all the data, or are you only interested in the last five entries? I mean, are you reading in a static file, or consuming a stream in real time? That will change the solution. Also, your example doesn't show that you are checking for duplicates, simply implementing a 5 entry FIFO – kdopen Apr 30 '16 at 0:54
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    Isn't this code review? – jDo Apr 30 '16 at 1:11
  • @kdopen I've edited my question. A 5 entry FIFO sounds just like what I'm looking for. Thank you for the term, I'll look into it. – user1334653 Apr 30 '16 at 1:14
  • @jDo looks like it should be there. Sorry, I didn't know about that part of StackExchange. – user1334653 Apr 30 '16 at 1:15
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collections.deque with limited maxlen will be effective in the insert+delete operation,

from collections import deque

activities = deque(maxlen=5)
# if len(activities) == 5 then the leftmost item will be removed before the push
activities.push(activity)

but # some code in-between may require some changes as now data is shifted on each step, changing the indices.

Or

you may prefill activities with Nones and then simply do

activities = [None] * 5
index = 0

# some code in-between

activities[index] = activity

if index == 4:
    index = 0
else:
    index = index + 1

assuming you have no none-activities)

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  • I've tried the None approach already but it required additional if statements when comparing objects. But deque is nice, thanks! – user1334653 Apr 30 '16 at 12:24
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The answer is to use a different data structure - one which is tailor made for this purpose. Your approach fails if the new item is not a duplicate of one of the most recent five elements.

Instead use a set.

Parse each activity into an object of a class with a __hash__ method, then simply add each new activity into the set as you parse them. This will leave you with a collection containing only the unique objects from your input.

Once you have finished parsing the input, you can convert the set into a list.

s = set()
while more_data_to_parse():
    s.add(parse_next_object())
activities = list(s)

For example:

>>> s = set()
>>> for i in [1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 1, 6]:
...     s.add(i)
... 
>>> activities=list(s)
>>> activities
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
>>> 

The resulting list won't be in the same order as the original input, but that can be resolved by simply sorting it.

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  • Hello. I'm parsing A LOT of data and checking the new activity against all old ones would be a huge bottleneck. The data is sorted by date and can really have a duplicate just in the last few lines. Getting the unique values is not the problem, I'm just asking for a solution that does the same thing as mine already does, but would look better. – user1334653 Apr 30 '16 at 0:38
  • sets are effectively a key-only hash-table, with an average complexity of O(1) for insertion. Removing duplicates is basically free. You can also use the orderedset package from Pypi to avoid the sort afterwards. – kdopen Apr 30 '16 at 0:45
  • But there set may be limited by available memory and @kdopen's method may operate on stream – robyschek Apr 30 '16 at 0:52
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You could use OrderedDict to do the filtering. It would preserve the original order so that result would be in order of first occurrence:

from collections import OrderedDict

items = [3, 5, 6, 2, 5, 6, 1, 7, 8, 2, 3, 6]
items = OrderedDict((x, True) for x in items).keys() # [3, 5, 6, 2, 1, 7, 8]

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