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I am working on an algorithm. But I am not very clear on the haskell code provide by the author, so I need you guys' help. The codes can split into two parts, I think.

> type LFT = (Integer, Integer, Integer, Integer)
>
> extr :: LFT -> Integer -> Rational
> extr (q,r,s,t) x = ((fromInteger q) * x + (fromInteger r)) / ((fromInteger s) * x + (fromInteger t))
>
> unit :: LFT
> unit = (1,0,0,1)
>
> comp :: LFT -> LFT -> LFT
> comp (q,r,s,t) (u,v,w,x) = (q*u+r*w,q*v+r*x,s*u+t*w,s*v+t*x)

Here, very clearly, a type called LFT (may be a tuple in Python) and three function called extr unit comp be defined.However, the next part puzzled me a lot:

> pi = stream next safe prod cons init lfts where
>   init = unit
>   lfts = [(k, 4*k+2, 0, 2*k+1) | k<-[1..]]
>   next z = floor (extr z 3)
>   safe z n = (n == floor (extr z 4))
>   prod z n = comp (10, -10*n, 0, 1) z
>   cons z z’ = comp z z’

I believe lfts is a generator but I am failed to understand how the loop performed in this code and I do not know much about the Haskell. Can you help me convert this one to Python or a pseudocode?

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2 Answers 2

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First of all the lfts is an infinite list. You can write very similar code using itertools.count:

from itertools import count

# count(1) is "equivalent2 to [1..]
lfts = ((k, 4*k+2, 0, 2*k+1) for k in count(1))

Now the important thing of the code is the call to stream which is a function that "performs the loop". That function is defined in the article as:

> stream :: (b->c) -> (b->c->Bool) -> (b->c->b) -> (b->a->b) ->
>           b -> [a] -> [c]
> stream next safe prod cons z (x:xs)
>   = if   safe z y
>     then y : stream next safe prod cons (prod z y) (x:xs)
>     else stream next safe prod cons (cons z x) xs
>       where y = next z

The idea of stream is that:

  • The last argument (x:xs) is an (infinite) input list (of type [a])
  • The one-to-last argument (z) is some form of state (of type b)
  • The other four arguments are functions that manipulate inputs and state:

    • The next function takes a state and produces an output (y).
    • The safe function checks whether y should be added in the output or not
    • The prod function produces the new state
    • The cons function is called when the y value is not added to the output and is used to produce the new state from the input value x.

You can reproduce such a function as:

import itertools as it

def stream(nxt, safe, prod, cons, state, inputs):
    x = next(inputs)   # obtain x
    # xs = inputs
    y = nxt(state)
    if safe(state, y):
        yield y
        inputs = it.chain([x], inputs)   # put x back in the input
        yield from stream(nxt, safe, prod, cons, prod(state, y), inputs)
    else:
        yield from stream(nxt, safe, prod, cons, cons(state, x), inputs)

So basically what this does is that it yields some values starting from a certain state. When it reaches a certain condition it consume an input value to produce a new state and yield more values, when it stops again it will use an other input value to produce a new state again etc. Ad infinitum.

Note that the above implementation will have really bad performance. It's better to avoid recursion in python so I'd use:

def stream(nxt, safe, prod, cons, state, inputs):
    while True:
        x = next(inputs)   # obtain x
        # xs = inputs
        y = nxt(state)
        if safe(state, y):
            yield y
            inputs = it.chain([x], inputs)   # put x back in the input
            state = prod(state, y)
        else:
            state = cons(state, x)
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3

lfts is indeed a (lazy) generator which is more or less equivalent to:

def lfts () :
    k = 1
    while True :
        yield (k,4*k+2,0,2*k+1)
        k += 1

This is because [1..] is an infinite list of incrementing integers starting from 1. Now k <- [1..] means that k each time picks the next value in the list, and you yield the thing at the left of the list comprehension.

It is thus a generator that will generate an infinite list, therefore you cannot simply call list() or len() onto it.


You can also use count from itertools to produce a oneliner:

((k,4*k+2,0,2*k+1) for k in itertools.count(1))

You can then take for instance the first five elements using itertools.islice:

>>> list(itertools.islice(((k,4*k+2,0,2*k+1) for k in itertools.count(1)), 0, 5))
[(1, 6, 0, 3), (2, 10, 0, 5), (3, 14, 0, 7), (4, 18, 0, 9), (5, 22, 0, 11)]

Since the generator can generate elements until the end of times, you can easily take an arbitrary amount of elements (above five, but twenty is evidently an option as well).

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  • That is very clear, but I can not understand how the iteration performed in this code. Could you make an explain?
    – Page David
    Commented Apr 30, 2016 at 14:28
  • @DavidPage: In python you can use the yield keyword to describe a generator. Python sees this as a continuation: if you ask for the first element it will process until it hits the first yield statement, and then suspend execution of the method. If you later ask the next element, it will again process and suspend after it has yielded the second element, and so on. Commented Apr 30, 2016 at 14:30

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