2

I have parent class:

class Data
{
    public:
        Data ( void ) { }
        Virtual int Size ( void ) 
        {
            return 100;
        }
    protected:
        map<string, Data*> m;

};

Classes that inherit from class Data:

class Struct : public Data
{
    public: 
        Struct ( void ) { }
        Struct & Add ( const string & name, Data x )
        {
            Data * tmp = new Data ( x );
            m[name] = tmp;
            return *this;
        }
        void Print ( void ) 
        {
            for ( const auto & tmp : m )
                cout << tmp . first << "    " << tmp . second -> Size () << endl;
        }
};

class IntData : public Data
{
    public:
        IntData ( void ) { }
        int Size ( void )
        {
            return 4;
        }
};

class DoubleData : public Data
{
    public:
        DoubleData ( void ) { }
        int Size ( void )
        {
            return 8;
        }

};

main :

int main ( void )
{
    Struct  a;
    a . Add ( "Integer",IntData () );
    a . Print ();
    return 0;
}

Current output : Integer 100
Expected output : Integer 4

I want to create a map which would hold various types of objects that are derived from Data class. But when i want to call method Size from stored object in map ( in this case IntData ) which should return 4 It always returns value from parent class Data. How could i fix that please?

  • Your Data class needs a virtual destructor. But more than that, polymorphism only works when you have reference or pointer as a parameter. Your Add function is passing an object. Google "object slicing". Also, post the real code, as Virtual is not a keyword. – PaulMcKenzie Apr 30 '16 at 16:46
4

There's your problem:

        Data * tmp = new Data ( x );

The actual pointer you're putting into the map is an instance of the Data parent class. You're copy-constructing a new instance of the Data parent class from an argument that you're passing, by value, as a parameter.

You need to change this whole function to:

    Struct & Add ( const string & name, Data *x)
    {
        m[name] = x;
        return *this;
    }

And the caller is now responsible for constructing a new instance of any subclass:

    a . Add ( "Integer",new IntData);

Then, this will work as you intended.

Of course, this kind of an approach brings up various issues with memory leaks, etc..., so you're better off using std::shared_ptr. But that would be a different question...

  • Yes thanks for your answer it works fine now but is there a way how to do that without passing new IntData , just by passing IntData () like i had in my code? – kvway Apr 30 '16 at 16:57
  • @kvway Please read my comment above. The answer is "no" -- polymorphism works with references and pointers. Passing an object by value slices it. – PaulMcKenzie Apr 30 '16 at 17:03
  • @kvway If Data had a virtual clone function and Add accepted a Data by reference then it might be possible, yes. But then why do you want to? – Chris Drew Apr 30 '16 at 17:14
  • @kvway, use references rather than pointers. Struct &Struct::Add(std::string const &, Data const &). – bipll Apr 30 '16 at 17:25
  • @Chris Drew i just want to make it like that. Could you give me some hint or advices how to do it ? I tried something but was getting too many errors. – kvway Apr 30 '16 at 18:01
1

I've rewritten your code for you.

#include <unordered_map>
#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

class Data {
    public:
        virtual ~Data(){}
        virtual int Size() = 0;
};

class Struct : public Data {
            std::unordered_map<std::string, std::unique_ptr<Data>> m;
    public: 
        Struct& Add(const std::string& name, std::unique_ptr<Data> x) {
            m[name] = std::move(x);
            return *this;
        }
        void Print() {
            for(const auto& tmp : m )
                std::cout << tmp.first << "    " << tmp.second->Size() << "\n";
        }
        int Size() override {
            int sum = 0;
            for (const auto& tmp : m)
                sum += tmp.second->Size();
            return sum;
        }
};

class IntData : public Data {
    public:
        int Size( ) override { return 4; }
};

class DoubleData : public Data {
    public:
        DoubleData( ) { }
        int Size( ) override { return 8; }
};

int main() {
    Struct  a;
    a.Add("Integer", std::make_unique<IntData>() );
    a.Print();
}

Your welcome.

  • Please add some explanation, not just the code, to make this an answer with a high value – Aminah Nuraini Apr 30 '16 at 22:01

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